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ILLINOIS STATE UNIVERSITY 

Undergraduate Catalog 
2010-2012 

Effective May 10, 2010 



. : :' 



Board of Trustees 

The Board of Trustees is the governing board for Illinois State University. 
Members of the Board are: 

Jay Bergman, Joliet 

Anne Davis, Chicago 

Betty Kinser, Normal 

Joanne Maitland, Bloomington 

Michael McCuskey, Urbana 

Bob Dobski, Bloomington 

Geno Bagnuolo, Bolingbrook 



University Administrative Officers 

Clarence Alvin Bowman, President 

Sheri Noren Everts, Vice President and Provost 

Jan Murphy, Associate Provost 

Daniel T. Layzell, Vice President of Finance and Planning 

Dianne Ashby, Vice President, University Advancement, and Executive Director, 

Illinois State University Foundation 

Steve Adams, Vice President of Student Affairs 

Rodney Custer, Associate Vice President, Graduate Studies, Research, and International Education 

Mardell Wilson, Assistant Vice President for Academic Fiscal Management 

Jonathan Rosenthal, Assistant Vice President, Enrollment Management and Academic Services 

Jeffrey Wood, Dean, College of Applied Science and Technology 

James Payne, Dean, College of Arts and Sciences 

Scott Johnson, Dean, College of Business 

Deborah Curtis, Dean, College of Education 

James Major, Dean, College of Fine Arts 

Janet Krejci, Dean, Mennonite College of Nursing 

Sohair F. Wastaway, Dean of University Libraries 



Faculty Information 

Faculty whose names appear in the department faculty lists were teaching at the University during the previous fall 
semester. Because of sabbatical leaves, temporary assignments, research projects, and other reasons, not all of these facul- 
ty will be teaching in the period covered by this catalog. 



University Offices 



University Operator (309) 438-21 1 1 

Academic Advisement 438-7604; www.uCollege.ilstu.edu/advising 

Admissions 438-2181; IllinoisState.edu/admissions 

Disability Concerns 438-5853 

Office of Equal Opportunity, Ethics and Access 438-3383; www/EqualOpportunity.ilstu.edu 

Financial Aid 438-2231; IllinoisState.edu/financialaid 

Graduate School 438-2583; www.Grad.ilstu.edu 

Honors Program 438-2559; IllinoisState.edu/honors 

International Studies 438-5365 

Office of Parking and Transportation 438-8391; www.Parking.ilstu.edu 

Parent Services 438-3753; www.DeanofStudents.ilstu.edu 

Student Affairs 438-5451; www.StudentAffairs.ilstu.edu 

Student Service Referral Center 438-2188; www.registrar.ilstu.edu 

University College 438-3217; IllinoisState.edu/ucollege 

University Housing Services 438-861 1; www.Housing.ilstu.edu 

University Registrar 438-2188; www.registrar.ilstu.edu 

Veterans Services 438-2207; www.registrar.ilstu.edu 



Visit our Illinois State University Website at IllinoisState.edu 
For the catalog information on-line, visit our catalog Web site at IllinoisState.edu/catalog 



The statements in this catalog are for informational purposes only and should not be construed as the basis of 
a contract between a student and Illinois State University. The course offerings and requirements of the 
University are continually under review and revision. This catalog presents those in effect at the time of publica- 
tion. Courses listed in this publication are subject to revision without advance notice and are not necessarily offered 
each term or each year. 

Information regarding changes will be available in the Offices of the University Registrar, the Provost, the 
colleges, major departments, and schools. It is especially important that each student note that it is his or her 
responsibility to be aware of current graduation requirements for a particular degree program. 



NOTIFICATION OF RIGHTS UNDER 
FERPA AND PUBLIC NOTIFICATION OF 
DIRECTORY INFORMATION 

Notification of Rights Under FERPA for 
Postsecondary Institutions: 

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act 
(FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to 
their education records. These rights include: 

( 1 ) The right to inspect and review the student's education 
records within 45 days of the day the University receives a 
request for access. 

A student should submit to the University Registrar a 
written request that identifies the record(s) the student 
wishes to inspect. The University official will make 
arrangements for access and notify the student of the 
time and place where the records may be inspected. If 
the records are not maintained by the University official 
to whom the request was submitted, that official shall 
advise the student of the correct official to whom the 
request should be addressed. 

(2) The right to request the amendment of the student's 
education records that the student believes are inaccurate, 
misleading, or otherwise in violation of the student's priva- 
cy rights under FERPA. 

A student who wishes to ask the University to 
amend a record should write the University official 
responsible for the record, clearly identify the part 
of the record the student wants changed, and speci- 
fy why it should be changed. 

If the University decides not to amend the record as 
requested, the University will notify the student in 
writing of the decision and the student's right to a 
hearing regarding the request for amendment. 
Additional information regarding the hearing proce- 
dures will be provided to the student when notified 
of the right to a hearing. 

(3) The right to provide written consent before the 
University discloses personally identifiable information from 
the student's education records, except to the extent that 
FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. 

The University discloses education records without a 
student's prior written consent under the FERPA excep- 
tion for disclosure to school officials with legitimate 
educational interests. A school official is a person 
employed by the University in an administrative, super- 
visory, academic or research, or support staff position 
(including law enforcement unit personnel and health 
staff); a person or company with whom the University 
has contracted as its agent to provide a service instead of 
using University employees or officials (such as an 
attorney, auditor, or collection agent); a person serving 
on the Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an offi- 
cial committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance com- 



mittee, or assisting another school official in performing 
his or her tasks. 

A school official has a legitimate educational interest if 
the official needs to review an education record in 
order to fulfill his or her professional responsibilities 
for the University. 

Upon request, the University also discloses education 
records without consent to officials of another school 
in which a student seeks or intends to enroll. 

(4) The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of 
Education concerning alleged failures by the University to 
comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and 
address of the office that administers FERPA is: 

Family Policy Compliance Office 
U.S. Department of Education 
400 Maryland Avenue, SW 
Washington, DC 20202-5901 

Public Notification of Directory Information: 

At its discretion, Illinois State University may provide 
"directory information" in accordance with the provisions 
of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 
(FERPA). Directory information is defined as that informa- 
tion which would not generally be considered harmful or 
an invasion of privacy if disclosed. Designated directory 
information at Illinois State University includes the follow- 
ing: student's name, address (local and home), telephone 
listing (local and home), electronic email address, date and 
place of birth, major field of study, dates of attendance, 
grade level, enrollment status (e.g. undergraduate or gradu- 
ate, full-time or part-time), participation in officially recog- 
nized activities or sports, weight or height of members of 
athletic teams, degrees, honors and awards received, and 
the most recent educational agency or institution attended. 
Students may block the public disclosure of directory infor- 
mation by notifying the Office of the University Registrar 
in writing prior to the first day of classes. 

Please consider very carefully the consequences of a 
decision to withhold directory information. A non-disclo- 
sure block will call for Illinois State University not to 
release any of this "directory information;" thus, any 
future requests for such information from non-institution- 
al persons or organizations will be refused. 

Illinois State University will honor your request to 
withhold directory information but cannot assume 
responsibility to contact you for subsequent permission to 
release this information. Regardless of the effect upon 
you, Illinois State University assumes no liability as a 
result of honoring your instructions that such information 
be withheld. 

Although the initial request may be filed at any time, 
requests for non-disclosure will be honored by the 
University until removed, in writing, by the student. 



OFFICE OF EQUAL OPPORTUNITY, 
ETHICS AND ACCESS 

Illinois State University fosters a campus environ- 
ment that recognizes individual and cultural differences 
and is strongly committed to the ethical and legal prin- 
ciple that each faculty member of the University com- 
munity enjoys academic freedom and all members of 
the University have a constitutional right to free speech. 
The right of free expression and the open exchange of 
ideas and views are essential, especially in a learning 
environment. Illinois State University vigorously 
upholds these freedoms. However, the value of free 
expression may be undermined by certain acts of 
harassment or discrimination. Such harassment or dis- 
crimination may result in the loss of self-esteem for the 
victim and the deterioration of a quality classroom, 
social, or work environment. Therefore any act of 
harassment or discrimination will not be tolerated. 

Harassment or discrimination based upon race, ethnici- 
ty, national origin, color, religion, gender, gender identity 
and expression, age, disability, sexual orientation, or veter- 
an status is in violation of the law and this policy and will 
not be tolerated. 

Retaliation against any person alleging harassment, 
discrimination, or exercising their legal right to have their 
allegation investigated (either internally or externally) is 
prohibited both by law and this policy. 

As members of the Illinois State University communi- 
ty, students, faculty, administrators and staff have the 
responsibility to respect and not violate the rights of others 
and to show tolerance for opinions that differ from their 
own. However, nothing in this policy prohibits appropriate 
admonition, argument and correction by an instructor in the 
conduct of his/her professional responsibility in the interest 
of maintaining order, upholding standards, stimulating 
thought or promoting competence. Such action is, by defin- 
ition, not a violation of this policy. Likewise, nothing in 
this policy precludes management's inherent authority to 
plan, direct and evaluate the activities of other organiza- 
tional members in accordance with sound management 
principles and directives, including communicating, train- 
ing and disciplining employees. 

All students, faculty and staff are expected to adhere to 
this policy and will be held accountable for violating it. 
Illinois State University will respond promptly to all com- 
plaints of harassment, discrimination, and retaliation. 
Violation of this policy can result in serious disciplinary 
action up to and including expulsion for students or dis- 
charge for employees. 

Definitions: 



der identity and expression, age, disability, sexual orienta- 
tion, or veteran status. 

Harassment: an unwelcome conduct that is based 
upon race, ethnicity, national origin, color, religion, gen- 
der, gender identity and expression, age, disability, sexual 
orientation, or veteran status. 

Sexual Harassment: any unwelcome behavior of a sex- 
ual nature which may be physical, verbal, or non-verbal. 
Sexual harassment includes unwelcome sexual advances, 
requests for sexual favors, or other behavior of a sexual 
nature and becomes a violation of University policy when: 

• The offensive conduct explicitly or implicitly 
becomes a term or condition of employment or partici- 
pation in a university course, program or activity; or 

• The conduct is sufficiently severe, pervasive, or per- 
sistent as to interfere with an individual's work, acade- 
mic or program participation, or creates an 
environment that a reasonable person would consider 
intimidating, hostile or offensive. 

Retaliation: occurs when an adverse action is taken 
against an individual because s/he engaged in a protected 
activity such as filing a harassment/discrimination com- 
plaint or participating in an investigation of a 
harassment/discrimination investigation. 

Statute of Limitations: 

To be actionable, a complaint must be filed with the 
Office of Equal Opportunity, Ethics, and Access within 
1 80 days of the most recent incident of alleged harassment 
or discrimination. 

Confidentiality: 

While confidentiality cannot be guaranteed, persons 
involved in a discrimination, harassment, or sexual harass- 
ment complaint are expected to treat all information as 
confidential unless disclosure of the information is com- 
pelled by law. 

Contact Information: 

For more information regarding this policy or to file a 
formal complaint please contact: 

The Office of Equal Opportunity, Ethics, and Access 

Illinois State University 

208 Hovey Hall - Campus Box 1280 

Normal, IL 61790 

PH: (309) 438-3383 

Website: www.EqualOpportunity.ilstu.edu 



Discrimination: an action or behavior that results in 
negative or different treatment of an individual based upon 
race, ethnicity, national origin, color, religion, gender, gen- 



Table of Contents 

Board of Trustees 1 

University Administrative Officers 1 

University Offices 2 

Notification of Rights Under FERPA 3 

Public Notification of Directory Information 3 

Office of Equal Opportunity, Ethics and Access 4 

University Calendar 

2010-2011 7 

2011-2012 8 

Using the Catalog 9 

Undergraduate Catalog Requirements 9 

Considering ISU? 10 

Overview of Illinois State 10 

Illinois State University Mission Statement 10 

University Commitment to Diversity 10 

Accreditation 10 

Campus, Student, Faculty Profiles, 10 

Community Profile 11 

Governance 11 

Division of University Advancement 11 

Academic Program Information 12 

List of University- Wide Programs 12 

Departmental and School Programs Listed by College 12 

Admission Policies 14 

Admission Application and Projected Deadlines 14 

Contact Visit Information 14 

Student Classifications 14 

Freshmen Admission 14 

Transfer Admission 15 

Second Bachelor's Degree 16 

Former Students Seeking Admission 16 

Visiting Students/Unclassified Admission 17 

International Student Admission 17 

Special Admission Programs 18 

Immunization and Medical Requirements for 

Students 18 

Financial Aid 19 

Financial Aid Office 19 

Financial Aid Application Procedures 19 

Federal Grants and Benefits 20 

ISU Grants 20 

State Scholarships and Grants 21 

Private Scholarships 22 

ISU Merit-Based Scholarships 22 

Loan Programs 23 

Financial Aid Disbursement 24 

Satisfactory Academic Progress 24 

Enrollment Changes-Financial Aid Eligibility 25 

Confidentiality 25 

Student Employment 25 

Tuition and Fees 26 

Estimated Total Yearly Expenses 26 

Undergraduate Tuition and Fees/Rate Schedule 26 

Transcripts 27 

Materials Charges 27 

Making the Transition 28 

New Student Orientation 28 

University College 28 

University College Academic Advisement 28 

Orientation and Transition Services 28 

Preview-Summer 28 



5 

Transfer Days 28 

First Year Learning in the Communities 28 

Veterans Services 29 

Housing and Dining Options 29 

Campus Living 29 

University Housing Services 29 

Residence Halls 29 

Apartment Living 29 

Campus Dining Services/Dining on Campus 30 

Campus Services 30 

Child Care 30 

Parking & Transportation 30 

Disability Concerns 30 

Health Promotion and Wellness 31 

Student Health Program 31 

Student Counseling Services 32 

Speech and Hearing Clinic 32 

Student Involvement and Community 33 

Dean of Students 33 

Community Rights and Responsibilities 33 

Diversity Advocacy 33 

Parent Services 33 

Student Involvement Center 33 

Campus Community and Recreation 34 

Bone Student Center/Braden Auditorium 34 

Campus Recreation 34 

Intercollegiate Athletics and Golf Course 34 

Career Planning 35 

Career Center 35 

Academic Services and Opportunities 36 

Academic Support Programs 36 

Student Support Services 36 

Developmental Math 36 

Julia N. Visor Academic Center 36 

University College Testing Office 36 

Computer Information Services 36 

Mathematics Tutor Center 37 

University Registrar Service Center 37 

Honors Programs 38 

Admission to Honors 38 

Academic Scholarships 38 

Academic Programs in Honors 39 

Continuation Requirements 39 

Academic Honors 40 

Undergraduate Degrees with Honors 40 

Campus Honors Societies 41 

Honors Courses 41 

Additional Academic Opportunities 42 

Undergraduate Teaching Assistants 42 

Undergraduate Research 42 

International Studies and NSE 43 

International Studies and Programs 43 

National Student Exchange Programs 43 

Semester Study Abroad Programs 43 

English Language Institute (ELI) 45 

Preparation for Graduate and Professional School 45 

Preparation for Graduate Study 45 

Graduate School 45 

Preparation for Professional Study 46 

Engineering 46 

Law 46 

Health Professions 46 

Medicine 46 

Dentistry 47 

Veterinary Medicine 47 



6 Table of Contents 

Academic Policies and Practices 49 

Degree Requirements 49 

General Requirements for Graduation 49 

Baccalaureate Degree Programs 50 

Bachelor of Science Graduation Requirement 

in Science, Mathematics and Technology 51 

Global Studies Graduation Requirements 52 

Graduation Procedures 53 

General Academic Policies 54 

Course Registration and Withdrawal 54 

Final Examinations 55 

University Grading System 55 

Academic Progress Alert 56 

Additional Academic Requirements 57 

Administrative Withdrawal 59 

Academic Integrity 59 

Proficiency and Placement Examinations 60 

International Baccalaureate Diploma Programs 62 

University-Wide Programs 63 

General Education 63 

General Education Requirements/Options 63 

General Education Program-Illinois State 

University 64 

General Education Course Requirements 65 

Transferring General Education Courses - 

Illinois Articulation Initiative 67 

University- Wide Teacher Education Programs 69 

Approved Teacher Education Programs 72 

Certificates 73 

Fields of Study 74 

Clinical Experiences in Teacher Education 75 

Student Teaching Requirements 75 

University- Wide Curriculum 77 

University- Wide Majors 77 

Major in Interdisciplinary Studies 77 

Major in University Studies 79 

University- Wide Minors 79 

African- American Studies 79 

African Studies 79 

Children's Studies 80 

Civic Engagement and Responsibility 80 

Cognitive Science 81 

Ethnic Studies 81 

Interdisciplinary Studies 82 

International Studies 82 

Latin American, Caribbean, Latino/a Studies 83 

Middle Eastern & South Asian Studies 84 

Native American Studies 84 

Peace and Conflict Resolution Studies 85 

Urban Studies 85 

Women's and Gender Studies 85 

University-Wide Courses 86 

Honors Courses 87 

Interdisciplinary Studies Courses 88 

College of Applied Science and Technology 89 

Departments or Schools: 

Agriculture 89 

Criminal Justice Sciences 95 

Family and Consumer Sciences 98 

Health Sciences 104 

Information Technology 115 

Kinesiology and Recreation 123 

Military Science 134 

Technology 136 



College of Arts and Sciences 145 

Departments or Schools: 

Biological Sciences 146 

Chemistry 152 

Communication 156 

Communication Sciences and Disorders 163 

Economics 165 

English 169 

Geography/Geology 179 

History 184 

Languages, Literatures, and Cultures 191 

Mathematics 200 

Philosophy 209 

Physics 212 

Politics and Government 215 

Psychology 222 

Social Work 226 

Sociology-Anthropology 228 

College of Business 237 

Departments: 

Accounting 239 

Finance, Insurance and Law 244 

Management and Quantitative Methods 247 

International Business 251 

Marketing 252 

Business Teacher Education 255 

College of Education 259 

Departments: 

Curriculum and Instruction 259 

Educational Administration and Foundations 265 

Special Education 266 

College of Fine Arts 271 

Arts Technology Program 271 

Schools: 

Art 272 

Music 282 

Theatre 291 

Mennonite College of Nursing 299 

Department: 

Nursing 300 

Definitions/Glossary 305 

Program and Course Explanations 307 

Units of Instruction 307 

Course Offerings 307 

Course Information 308 

Course Numbering 308 

Course Descriptions 308 

Course Information and Abbreviations 308 

Departmental Abbreviations 309 

Faculty Information 311 

University Faculty and Administrative Staff 311 

Index 330 



2010 







~T 7 — "- — " — ~ 












May 






2010 Summer Session 




S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


May 10 


Opening of summer session. 




2 


3 


4 5 6 


7 


1 
X 


May 31 


Memorial Day holiday. 




9 


10 


11 12 13 


14 


15 


June 1 1 


Last day for undergraduate students to apply and pay fee for graduation in 


August. 


16 

23 


17 
24 


18 19 20 
25 26 27 


21 

2X 


22 
29 


July 5 


Independence Day holiday - no classes. 




30 


31 








August 6 


Summer session ends. 














August 10 


Grades due by 12:00 noon. 








June 












S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


2010 Fall Seme; ^ 








1 2 3 


4 


5 








6 


7 


8 9 10 


11 


12 


Aug. 16-22 


Registration and program change. Please see registration information 




13 

20 


14 
21 


15 16 17 
22 23 24 


18 

25 


19 

26 




at www.registrar.ilstu.edu. 




27 


28 


29 30 






Aug. 22 


Last day to withdraw from classes with a full refund of tuition and fees. 
Classes begin. 














Aug. 23 






July 






Aug. 27 


Last day for late registration. 












Sept. 3 


Last day for program change. 




S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


Sept. 6 


Labor Day holiday. 




4 


5 


1 

6 7 8 


2 
9 


3 
10 


Sept. 10 


Last day for undergraduate students to apply and pay fee for graduation in December. 


1 i 


12 


13 14 15 


16 


17 


Oct. 15 


Last day to withdraw or to remove credit/no-credit or audit option from a full 


IX 


19 


20 21 22 


23 


24 


Oct. 16 


semester class. 

First half of semester ends. 




25 


26 


27 28 29 


30 


31 














Oct. 18 


Second half of semester begins. 








August 






Nov. 12 


Last day to withdraw from the University for fall 2010. 




S 

1 


M 
2 


T W T 

3 4 5 


F 
g 


S 

7 


Nov. 20 


Thanksgiving vacation begins at 12:00 noon. 




8 


9 


10 11 12 


13 


14 


Nov. 29 


Classes resume. 




15 


16 


17 18 19 


20 


21 


Dec. 1 1 


Last day of classes. 




22 
24 


23 
30 


24 25 26 
31 


27 


28 


Dec. 13-17 


Evaluation and review period. 








Dec. 17 


Fall semester ends. 














Dec. 18 


Commencement. 








September 






Dec. 20 


Grades due by 12:00 noon. 




S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


2011 Spring Semester 




5 


6 


1 2 
7 8 9 


3 
10 


4 
11 








12 


13 


14 15 16 


17 


18 


Jan. 3-9 


Registration and program change. Please see registration information 




19 


20 


21 22 23 


24 


25 




at www.registrar.ilstu.edu. 




26 


27 


28 29 30 






Jan. 9 


Last day to withdraw from classes with a full refund of tuition and fees. 
Classes begin. 














Jan. 10 








October 






Jan. 14 


Last day for late registration. 




S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 
2 
9 


Jan. 17 


Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday. 




3 


4 


5 6 7 


8 


Jan. 24 


Last day for program change. 




10 


11 


12 13 14 


15 


16 


Feb. 11 


Last day for undergraduate students to apply and pay fee for graduation in 


May. 


17 


18 


19 20 21 


22 


23 


Mar. 4 


Last day to withdraw or drop the credit/no-credit or audit option from a full 


24 
31 


25 


26 27 28 


29 


30 




semester class. 

First half semester ends. Spring vacation begins at noon. 














Mar. 5 






November 






Mar. 14 


Classes resume. 




S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


April 8 


Last day to withdraw from the University for Spring 201 1. 






1 


2 3 4 


5 


6 


April 30 


Last day of classes. 




7 


8 


9 10 11 


12 


13 


May 2-6 


Evaluation and review period. 




14 

21 


15 

22 


16 17 18 
23 24 25 


19 
26 


20 

27 


May 6 


Spring semester ends. 




28 


29 


30 






May 6-7 


Commencement. 

Grades due by 12:00 noon. 














May 10 






December 






The University will accommodate, within reason, students whose religious obligation 


requires absence 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


from class. Students who are unable to attend class or take examinations for religious reasons should consult 


j 


g 


1 2 
7 8 9 


3 

10 
17 


4 


their instructors in advance about alternative arrangements. 




12 


13 


14 15 16 


IX 








19 


20 


21 22 23 


24 


25 








26 


27 


28 29 30 


31 




















January 


February 


March 




April 






May 






S M T W 


T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M 


T W T F S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 




1 


12 3 4 5 


12 3 4 5 




1 2 


1 


2 


3 4 5 


6 


7 


2 3 4 5 


6 7 8 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


3 4 


5 6 7 8 9 


8 


9 


10 11 12 


13 


14 


9 10 11 12 


13 14 15 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


10 11 


12 13 14 15 16 


15 


16 


17 18 19 


20 


21 


16 17 18 19 


20 21 22 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


17 18 


19 20 21 22 23 


22 


23 


24 25 26 


27 


28 


23 24 25 26 


27 28 29 


27 28 


27 28 29 30 31 


24 25 


26 27 28 29 30 


29 


30 


31 






30 31 























2011 



University Calendar, 2011-2012 










May 






2011 Summer Session 


S 
1 


M 

2 


T 
3 


W T 

4 5 


F 
6 


S 

7 






X 


9 


10 


11 12 


13 


14 


May 9 


Opening of summer session. 


15 


16 


17 


18 19 


20 


21 


May 30 


Memorial Day holiday. 


22 


23 


24 


25 26 


27 


28 


June 10 


Last day for undergraduate students to apply and pay fee for graduation in August. 


29 


30 


31 








July 4 


Independence Day holiday - no classes. 
Summer session ends. 














August 5 








June 






August 9 


Grades due by 12:00 noon. 


S 


M 


T 


W T 


F 


S 


2011 Fall Semester 


5 


6 


7 


1 2 
8 9 


3 
10 


4 
11 






12 


13 


14 


15 16 


17 


18 


Aug. 15-21 


Registration and program change. Please see registration information 


19 


20 


21 


22 23 


24 


25 




at www.registrar.ilstu.edu. 


26 


27 


28 


29 30 






Aug. 21 


Last day to withdraw from classes with a full refund of tuition and fees. 














Aug. 22 


Classes begin. 








July 






Aug. 26 


Last day for late registration. 


S 


M 


T 


W T 


F 


S 


Sept. 2 


Last day for program change. 










1 


2 


Sept. 5 


Labor Day holiday. 


3 

10 


4 
11 


5 
12 


6 7 
13 14 


8 

15 


9 

16 


Sept. 9 


Last day for undergraduate students to apply and pay fee for graduation in December. 


17 


18 


19 


20 21 


22 


23 


Oct. 14 


Last day to withdraw or to remove credit/no-credit or audit option from a full 

semester class. 

First half of semester ends. 


24 
31 


25 


26 


27 28 


29 


30 


Oct. 15 






L 








Oct. 17 


Second half of semester begins. 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


Nov. 1 1 


Last day to withdraw from the University for Fall 201 1 . 














Nov. 19 


Thanksgiving vacation begins at 12:00 noon. 




1 
8 
15 


2 
9 
16 


3 4 
10 11 
17 18 


5 

12 
19 


6 
13 

20 


Nov. 28 


Classes resume. 


14 


Dec. 10 


Last day of classes. 


21 


22 


23 


24 25 


26 


27 


Dec. 12-16 


Evaluation and review period. 


28 


29 


30 


31 






Dec. 16 


Fall semester ends. 














Dec. 17 


Commencement. 






September 






Dec. 20 


Grades due by 12:00 noon. 


S 


M 


T 


W T 


F 
2 
9 


S 
3 
10 


2012 Spring 


Semester 


4 


5 


6 


1 

7 8 






11 


12 


13 


14 15 


16 


17 


Jan. 9-16 


Registration and program change. Please see registration information 

at www.registrar.ilstu.edu. 

Last day to withdraw from classes with a full refund of tuition and fees. 


18 

25 


19 
26 


20 

27 


21 22 
28 29 


23 
30 


24 


Jan. 16 






M/»f/\kar 






Jan. 16 
Jan. 17 


Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday. 
Classes begin. 


S 


M 


T 


W T 


F 


S 
1 


Jan. 23 


Last day for late registration and course changes. 


2 


3 


4 


5 6 


7 


8 


Jan. 30 


Last day for program change. 


9 


10 


11 


12 13 


14 


15 


Feb. 10 


Last day for undergraduate students to apply and pay fee for graduation in May. 


16 

23 


17 
24 


18 

25 


19 20 
26 27 


21 
28 


22 
29 


Mar. 9 


Last day to withdraw or drop the credit/no-credit or audit option from a full 

semester class. 

First half semester ends. Spring vacation begins at noon. 


30 


31 










Mar. 10 






November 






Mar. 19 


Classes resume. 


S 


M 


T 


W T 


F 


S 


April 13 


Last day to withdraw from the University for Spring 2012. 






l 


2 3 


4 


5 


May 5 


Last day of classes. 


6 


7 


8 


9 10 


11 


12 


May 7-11 


Evaluation and review period. 


13 

20 


14 
21 


15 
22 


16 17 
23 24 


18 
25 


1^ 
26 


May 11 


Spring semester ends. 


27 


28 


29 


30 






May 11-12 


Commencement. 

Grades due by 12:00 noon. 














May 15 






December 










S 


M 


T 


W T 


F 


S 


The University will accommodate, within reason, students whose religious obligation requires absence from 








1 


2 


3 


class. Students who are unable to attend class or take examinations for religious reasons should consult their instruc- 


4 


5 


6 


7 8 


9 


10 


tors in advance about alternative arrangements. 


1 1 
18 


12 
19 


13 
20 


14 15 

21 22 


16 
23 


17 

24 






25 


26 


27 


28 29 


30 


31 


2012 
















January 


February 


March 


April 








May 






S M T W 


T F s 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S 


M 


T 


W T 


F 


S 


12 3 4 


5 6 7 


12 3 4 


1 2 3 


12 3 4 5 6 7 






1 


2 3 


4 


5 


8 9 10 11 


12 13 14 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


6 


7 


8 


9 10 


11 


12 


15 16 17 18 


19 20 21 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


13 


14 


15 


16 17 


18 


19 


22 23 24 25 


26 27 28 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


20 


21 


22 


23 24 


25 


26 


29 30 3 1 




26 27 28 29 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


29 30 


27 


28 


29 


30 31 







USING THE CATALOG 



The University provides this Undergraduate Catalog 
to answer some of your basic questions and guide you in 
the right direction when you need assistance. You are 
encouraged to review the entire Undergraduate Catalog 
carefully to gain an overview of the opportunities offered 
by the University, as well as the University's expectations 
of you. 

For specific information about particular concerns, con- 
sult the Table of Contents, Glossary, or Index in this catalog. 

In this catalog you will find descriptions of a wide 
variety of undergraduate programs (majors and minors) in 
more than 167 separate fields of study. Review the depart- 
ment and school sections for an understanding of the 
requirements for each of these specific programs. In addi- 
tion, the Academic Policies and Practices section details 
the general requirements necessary for completion of the 
undergraduate degree. 

In this catalog you will also find descriptions for the 
undergraduate courses offered by the 35 academic depart- 
ments and schools of the University. To learn what specific 
courses are offered in a given semester, consult your major 
department/school or the University Website at 
www.IllinoisState.edu. 

Undergraduate Catalog 
Requirements 

For a student who attends at least one term of each 
academic year, graduation requirements are specified in 
the Undergraduate Catalog for the year of entry to the 
University. If attendance is not continuous, a student must 
meet the requirements specified in the Undergraduate 



Catalog in effect when he or she reenters the University. 
If such a student continues in the curriculum chosen origi- 
nally, the hours earned in meeting the requirements of the 
original program may apply to the hour requirement of a 
revised program. 

In all instances, the University may adjust graduation 
requirements to ensure that each graduate of a teacher prepa- 
ration curriculum meets the course requirements for an 
Illinois Teaching Certificate. 

A student who transfers from an Illinois public com- 
munity college to this university may choose to meet gradua- 
tion requirements specified in the Illinois State University 
Undergraduate Catalog in effect at the time the student 
entered the community college if ( 1 ) attendance was not 
interrupted (not including summer terms), and (2) transfer to 
Illinois State occurred within nine months of attendance at 
the community college. 

Since University programs are constantly evaluated and 
improved, a student may graduate under new requirements 
published while he or she is in attendance at the 
University. A student who changes to new Undergraduate 
Catalog requirements, however, must meet all the 
requirements including General Education and gradua- 
tion requirements, in that catalog. 

COURSE PREREQUISITES 

Course prerequisites in effect at the time of publication 
are printed in this catalog. However, prerequisites may 
change over time and do not depend on catalog year. The 
registration system will enforce prerequisites in effect at 
time of registration. 



10 



CONSIDERING ISU? 



Overview of Illinois State 

ILLINOIS STATE UNIVERSITY MISSION 
STATEMENT 

We at Illinois State University work as a diverse com- 
munity of scholars with a commitment to fostering a small- 
college atmosphere with large-university opportunities. We 
promote the highest academic standards in our teaching, 
scholarship, public service and the connections we build 
among them. We devote all our resources and energies to 
creating the most supportive and productive community pos- 
sible to serve the citizens of Illinois and beyond. 

Adopted by Academic Senate, May 7, 2008. 

UNIVERSITY COMMITMENT TO DIVERSITY 

Illinois State University is committed to creating a rich 
and challenging learning environment for all members of 
our intellectual community, inside and outside of the class- 
room. Diversity is a critical component of that learning 
environment and the Illinois State University community 
embraces it enthusiastically. The Board of Trustees and the 
Office of the President have approved a University Plan for 
Diversity that establishes a series of goals and concrete 
actions designed to reinforce and expand the climate for 
diversity on campus. The goals from the Plan for Diversity 
are incorporated into the University's strategic plan, 
Educating Illinois. Diversity is thus an essential component 
of university planning at Illinois State. 

ACCREDITATION 

Illinois State University is accredited by the Higher 
Learning Commission of the North Central Association of 
Colleges and Schools. For further information regarding 
this accreditation contact North Central Association of 
Colleges and Schools, at 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 
2400, Chicago, Illinois 60602-2504, phone (800) 621- 
7440 or (312) 263-0456, or the commission's Website at 
www.ncacihe.org. In addition, various programs hold disci- 
pline-based accreditation. The list of agencies the 
University is associated with can be viewed on ISU 
Website: www.provost.ilstu.edu/resources/accreditation. 

CAMPUS PROFILE 

Illinois State's tree-shaded campus covers 490 acres and 
provides a study of varying architecture with 140 major 
buildings, most of which are less than 40 years old and 
accessible to individuals with disabilities. Buildings range 
from the castle-like appearance of Cook Hall to the mod- 
ernistic dominance of the 28-story Watterson Towers resi- 
dence hall, the high-tech Science Laboratory Building and 
the College of Business Building. 



Classrooms are centrally located, conveniently sur- 
rounded by Milner Library, residence halls, athletic arenas, 
and facilities set aside for recreational or social activities. 
For destinations that may be too far to walk, a bus service 
runs through campus at no cost to students with a valid 
Illinois State University I.D. It also accommodates students 
with disabilities unable to use the regular bus system and 
those students who live in areas not serviced by established 
city routes. 

Campus facilities include: 

• Milner Library, which has 1 .7 million catalogued books, 
2,855 current magazine and journal subscriptions, 
54,500 electronic journals, 400,000 printed government 
publications, 440,000 maps, and 32,000 multimedia 
items. Milner's Website (www.library.ilstu.edu) serves 
as an electronic gateway to library resources, ser- 
vices, facilities, and staff. In addition, Milner's "Ask 
a Librarian" service provides online access to live ref- 
erence through Instant Messaging, text, and email ref- 
erence assistance. 

• Bone Student Center, including 3,500-seat Braden 
Auditorium and the adjacent Bowling and Bill- 
iards Center. 

Ten residence halls. 

The College of Business Building, the newest addition 
to campus, is around 118,000 gross square feet of 
classrooms, conference rooms, and offices equipped 
with state-of-the-art technology. Other special features 
include an auditorium with seating for over 200, a five- 
story atrium, and a central courtyard. 

• The Science Laboratory Building, a state-of-the-art 
facility, that provides to students and faculty new 
opportunities for instruction and research. 

• Student Services Building, including a modern, accredit- 
ed, comprehensive health service. 

• The Center for Performing Arts, with a 450 seat 
proscenium theater and an 800-seat concert hall, pro- 
vides a high quality venue for performances. 

• 1 8-hole championship golf course, 1 1 tennis courts, 
and Campus Recreation that offers features of a full- 
service health club. 

Redbird Arena and Horton Field House, which seat 
10,005 and 8,000 respectively. 

• Numerous visitors' attractions that include a planetar- 
ium, one of the largest art galleries for rotating dis- 
plays in the state, ISU's fully operational 360 acre 
farm at Lexington, and the Jesse Fell Arboretum that 
includes more than 4,000 trees representing more 
than 100 species. 



Considering ISU? 11 



STUDENT PROFILE 

Students who choose Illinois State University come 
from across the state, the nation, and around the globe. 
The diversity that exists within the student body enriches 
all aspects of the collegiate experience and makes the liv- 
ing and learning environment especially dynamic. 

The academic success students achieve at Illinois State 
is apparent in the University's graduation, placement, and 
satisfaction rates. Nearly seventy percent of first-time 
freshmen graduate within six years. Responses to surveys 
of alumni reveal that 92 percent are employed and/or 
enrolled in further study, and 94 percent believe that 
Illinois State prepared them for their position. 

FACULTY PROFILE 

The vast majority of Illinois State's faculty members 
hold the highest degrees in their field. Numerous Illinois 
State faculty have been selected as Fulbright scholars, and 
many others hold leadership positions in professional 
organizations and societies. All are committed to excel- 
lence in teaching and service, as well as to producing 
high-quality research, publications, and creative art. 

Faculty share their expertise beyond the expected lec- 
tures and laboratory sessions, giving students the opportuni- 
ty to participate in scholarly research. Student research, 
completed in collaboration with distinguished professors 
and outstanding university researchers, is showcased each 
spring in the Undergraduate Research Symposium. 

COMMUNITY PROFILE 

Illinois State is located in the twin-city community of 
Bloomington-Normal, with a population of approximately 
150,000. Centrally located just 137 miles southwest of 
Chicago and 164 miles northeast of St. Louis, the communi- 
ty is situated at the crossroads of three major interstates as 
well as along the Chicago and St. Louis railroad corridor. 
One of the fastest growing areas in Illinois, Bloomington- 
Normal enjoys a strong economy that is built on a blend of 
insurance, education, agribusiness, and industry. 

GOVERNANCE 

The Academic Senate is the major internal governance 
body of the University. The Senate acts in legislative and 
advisory roles with regard to University policies involving 
faculty and students, academic programs and planning, and 
University concerns. Based upon the concept of shared gov- 
ernance, the 62-member Senate's representatives consist of 
31 faculty members, the composition of which is 29 
tenure/tenure track faculty members, one non-tenure-track 
faculty member and one Faculty Associate from the Lab 
Schools, 2 1 students, including the Student Body President, 
one representative from the Civil Service Council and one 
from the Administrative Professional Council. Additionally, 
the ex-officio representatives are the President of the 
University, three Vice Presidents, one Associate Vice 
President, a representative from the Deans Council, a repre- 
sentative from the Chairs Council, and the Student Trustee. 



Through the Academic Senate and its external committee 
system, students, faculty, staff and administrators share in the 
study and development of policy. Students are encouraged to 
participate in the Senate-appointed committees and councils 
such as Academic Planning Committee, Athletic Council, 
Council for Teacher Education, Honors Council, Council on 
General Education, Student Center Performing Arts and 
Advisory Boards, Library, Reinstatement Committees, 
Student Code Enforcement and Review Board (SCERB), and 
University Curriculum Committee. Students also participate 
as members of college and departmental councils and cur- 
riculum committees, and serve on search committees for the 
evaluation of administrative applicants and on ad hoc com- 
mittees. Application forms for committees for faculty are 
available from the Academic Senate Office, Campus Box 
1830, Hovey 408; (309) 438-8735; email address: 
acsenate@ilstu.edu. Applications for students are available at 
the Student Government Association Office, (309) 438-8971. 

DIVISION OF UNIVERSITY ADVANCEMENT 

Alumni Relations: Once a Redbird, always a Redbird! 
As far back as 1863, graduates of Illinois State have met to 
renew friendships, help one another find jobs, and return to 
campus for celebrations like Homecoming. Today, our 
more than 180,000 alumni carry on these traditions in addi- 
tion to networking online, donating monies for student 
scholarships, and supporting Redbird Athletics. 
Membership in the Alumni Association is free, but the ben- 
efits are priceless. 

Contact Alumni Relations to learn how you can connect 
with alumni for internships, mentoring, professional net- 
working, the Student Alumni Association and much more. 
Check out opportunities for involvement like the Student 
Alumni Council or the annual Homecoming celebration. 
Visit us on the Web, or in person at the Illinois State 
University Alumni Centers on campus (1101 N. Main) or in 
Chicago (150 S. Michigan Avenue). Spread the Red! 

Foundation: The Illinois State University Foundation is 
a not-for-profit corporation chartered by the State of Illinois 
for the sole purpose of soliciting, receiving, holding, invest- 
ing, and administering gifts, grants, real property, historical 
papers, collections, and other materials which support and 
enhance educational opportunities at Illinois State 
University. The Foundation supports Illinois State 
University via direct gifts and spending supported by 
growth in Foundation investments. The majority of 
Foundation spending supports scholarships for Illinois 
State University students. The Foundation owns the Illinois 
State University Alumni Center, where the Foundation, 
Alumni Relations, and other university functions are located. 
The Foundation also owns and operates Ewing Cultural 
Center, which comprises Ewing Manor, The Theatre at 
Ewing (home of the Illinois Shakespeare Festival), and the 
Genevieve Green Garden. It also maintains an office in 
Chicago which supports alumni and staff of Illinois State 
University and houses Chicago-based staff of Alumni 
Relations, Development, and the Office of Admissions. A 



12 



Considering ISU? 



Board of Directors comprised of alumni, friends of the 
University, and ex-officio campus representatives oversees 
the policies for the Illinois State University Foundation. 
Gifts made to the Illinois State University Foundation are tax 
deductible as provided by law. Further information about the 
Foundation may be obtained by contacting the Vice 
President for University Advancement, (309) 438-7681. 

Development Office: The Office of Development 
works with the Foundation to coordinate and encourage pri- 
vate giving from the broad range of the University's con- 
stituencies. The financial support generated through private 
giving provides resources for scholarships, faculty rewards, 
departmental programming, facilities and equipment and 
endowments. The Development Office is located in the 
Illinois State University Alumni Center, 1101 N. Main 
Street, Normal, Illinois. 

Donor and Information Services: Located in the 
Illinois State University Alumni Center (1101 N. Main, 
Normal), Donor and Information Services supports the 
University's fundraising and donor outreach efforts. The 
department maintains the University's alumni and develop- 
ment database and provides assistance to development staff 
and others on campus involved in alumni, fund-raising, and 
donor stewardship activities. 

University Marketing and Communications: 

University Marketing and Communications (UMC) concen- 
trates on sharing the Illinois State University story with 
internal and external audiences. UMC's services to the 
University community include: editorial (writing and copy 
editing), graphic design photography, video, printing, adver- 
tising, identity and logo services, electronic marketing and 
communications, and integrated marketing. Illinois State, the 
University's quarterly alumni magazine, is among the many 
publications UMC produces. UMC also manages licensing 
agreements and the trademark royalty program. UMC has 
offices in the Illinois State University Alumni Center and the 
Nelson Smith Building. 

Academic Program Information 

Illinois State University has one of the largest under- 
graduate programs in Illinois and a distinguished history as 
the first public institution of higher education in the state. 
With such a rich heritage, the University has established a 
long-standing tradition of excellence in undergraduate edu- 
cation. The attention to baccalaureate education is demon- 
strated repeatedly as the campus community works to 
implement innovative programs that specifically benefit the 
undergraduate student. 

As an undergraduate you soon will recognize the 
University is your partner in preparing for your success 
not only in the classroom but beyond and into the work- 
place. You will benefit from the invaluable time and 
expertise shared through individualized faculty attention, 
as more than 90 percent of undergraduate classes at 
Illinois State are taught by faculty members. 



Illinois State University offers a variety of academic 
majors and minors. Students select from diverse high- 
quality curricula that prepares them for living and work- 
ing in the 21st century. Academic degrees, listed by 
College, are outlined below. 

UNIVERSITY-WIDE PROGRAMS 

African- American Studies: (undergraduate minor) 

African Studies: (undergraduate minor) 

Children's Studies: (undergraduate minor) 

Civic Engagement and Responsibility (undergraduate 
minor) 

Cognitive Science: (undergraduate minor) 

Ethnic Studies: (undergraduate minor) 

Honors 

Interdisciplinary Studies: B.A., B.S. (also undergraduate 
minor) 

International Studies: (undergraduate minor) 

Latin American, Caribbean and Latino/a Studies: 
(undergraduate minor) 

Middle Eastern and South Asian Studies: (under- 
graduate minor) 

Native American Studies (undergraduate minor) 

Peace and Conflict Resolution Studies: (undergraduate minor) 

Teacher Education 

University Studies: B.A., B.S. 

Urban Studies: (undergraduate minor) 

Women's and Gender Studies: (undergraduate minor) 

DEPARTMENTAL AND SCHOOL 
PROGRAMS LISTED BY COLLEGE 

College of Applied Science and Technology 

Agriculture: B.S., M.S. 

Athletic Training: B.S., M.S. 

Community Health Education: (undergraduate minor) 

Computer Science: B.S. 

Construction Management: B.S. 

Criminal Justice Sciences: B.A., B.S., M.A., M.S. 

Environmental Health: B.S. 

Exercise Science: B.S. 

Family and Consumer Sciences: B.A., B.S., M. A., M.S. 

Graphic Communications: B.S. 

Health Education: B.S., B.S. in Ed. 

Health Information Management: B.S. 

Industrial Technology: B.S. 

Information Systems: B.S., M.S. 

Kinesiology and Recreation: M.S. 

Medical Laboratory Science: B.S. 

Military Science: (undergraduate minor) 

Physical Education: B.S., B.S. in Ed. 

Recreation and Park Administration: B.S. 

Renewable Energy, B.S. 

Safety: B.S. 

School Health Education (undergraduate minor) 

Technology: M.S. 

Technology Education: B.S. 

Telecommunications Management: B.S. 



Considering ISU? 



13 



College of Arts and Sciences 

African- American Studies: (undergraduate minor) 

African Studies: (undergraduate minor) 

Anthropology: B.A., B.S. 

Applied Economics: M.A., M.S. 

Archaeology: M.A., M.S. 

Audiology: Au.D. 

Biochemistry/Molecular Biology: B.S. 

Biological Sciences: B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 

Chemistry: B.S., M.S., M.C.E. 

Children's Studies: (undergraduate minor) 

Civic Engagement and Responsibility: (undergraduate 

minor) 
Clinical Counseling Psychology: M.A., M.S. 
Cognitive Science: (undergraduate minor) 
Communication: M.A., M.S. 
Communication Studies: B.A., B.S. 
East Asian Studies: (undergraduate minor) 
Economics: B.A., B.S. 
English: B.A., M.A., M.S. 
English Studies: Ph.D. 

Environmental Studies: (undergraduate minor) 
Foreign Languages in the Elementary School: 

(undergraduate minor) 
French: B.A. 
Geography: B.A., B.S. 
Geology: B.S. 
German: B.A. 

Gerontology: (undergraduate minor) 
History: B.A., B.S., M.A., M.S. 
Hydrogeology: M.S. 

Instructional Media: (undergraduate minor) 
Integrated B.A., M.A., Languages, Literature, and 

Cultures (French, Spanish, or German) 
Italian Studies (undergraduate minor) 
Journalism: B.A., B.S. 

Journalism Teacher Education: (undergraduate minor) 
Latin: (undergraduate minor) 
Latin American, Caribbean and Latino/a Studies: 

(undergraduate minor) 
Middle Eastern and South Asian Studies: (under 

graduate minor) 
Legal Studies: (undergraduate minor) 
Mass Media: B.A., B.S. 
Mathematics: B.A., B.S., M.S. 
Mathematics Education: Ph.D. 

Peace and Conflict Resolution Studies: (undergraduate minor) 
Philosophy: B.A. 
Physics: B.S. 

Political Science: B.A., B.S., M.A., M.S. 
Psychology: B.A., B.S., M.A., M.S. 
Public Relations: B.A., B.S. 
Religious Studies: (undergraduate minor) 
School Psychology: S.S.P., Ph.D. 
Social Work: B.S.W., M.S.W. 
Sociology: B.A., B.S., M.A., M.S. 



Spanish: B.A. 

Speech Pathology and Audiology: B.S. , MA, M.S. 

Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages: 

(undergraduate minor) 
Urban Studies: (undergraduate minor) 
Women's and Gender Studies: (undergraduate minor) 
Writing: M.A., M.S., and (undergraduate minor) 

College of Business 

Accountancy: B.S., M.S., Integrated B.S./M.P.A. 

Business Administration: B.S., M.B.A. 

Business Information Systems: B.S. 

Business Teacher Education: B.A., B.S., B.S. in Ed. 

Finance: B.S. 

Financial Planning: (undergraduate minor) 

Insurance: B.S. 

International Business: B.A., B.S. 

Management: B.S. 

Marketing: B.S. 

Organizational Leadership: (undergraduate minor) 

College of Education 

College Student Personnel Administration: M.S. 
Curriculum and Instruction: M.S., M.S.Ed., Ed.D 
Early Childhood Education: B.S., B.S. in Ed. 
Educational Administration: M.S., M.S. Ed, EdD., Ph.D. 
Elementary Education: B.S., B.S. in Ed. 
Instructional Technology and Design: M.S. 
Middle Level Teacher Education: B.S., B.S. in Ed. 
Reading: M.S.Ed. 
Special Education: B.S., B.S.Ed, M.S., M.S.Ed, EdD. 

College of Fine Arts 

Art: B.A., B.S., B.F.A, M.A., M.S., M.F.A. 
Arts Technology: B.A., B.S., M.S. 
Cinema Studies: (undergraduate minor) 
Dance: (undergraduate minor) 
Music: B.A., B.S., M.M., M.M.Ed. 
Music Education: B.M.E. 
Music Performance: B.M. 
Theatre: B.A., B.S., M.A., M.S., M.F.A. 

Mennonite College of Nursing 

Nursing: B.S.N., M.S.N., Ph.D. 



14 Considering ISU? 

Admission Policies 

ADMISSION APPLICATION AND 
PROJECTED DEADLINES 

Illinois State University maintains a small college 
environment within a large university. We value personal 
attention for each and every student, and our commitment 
to individuals ensures that every application will be 
reviewed carefully by admissions representatives. 

Illinois State seeks a highly-motivated, academically 
well-prepared, and diverse student body. Admission to the 
University is competitive. Applying early is encouraged as 
the University has the right to limit enrollment due to 
space availability in major programs and overall student 
capacity. Please refer to the Application for Admission or 
the Admissions Website for more information and detailed 
dates and deadlines. 

All prospective new students and students wanting to 
return to the University after time away should apply for 
admission to Illinois State University online at 
IllinoisState.edu/apply. 



VISIT AND CONTACT INFORMATION 

The Office of Admissions encourages students and 
families to visit campus. Campus Information Sessions, 
Open Houses and appointments with an Admission 
Counselor are available. For more information or to make a 
visit reservation, visit the Office of Admissions Website or 
contact the Admissions Office. 

Prospective students may contact the Office of 
Admissions through a variety of sources. 

Address: 

Illinois State University 

Office of Admissions, Hovey Hall 201 

Campus Box 2200 

Normal, IL 61790-2200 

Telephone: (309) 438-2181 
Toll free: (800) 366-2478 
TTY: (309) 438-2006 

Websites: IllinoisState.edu/admissions 

IllinoisState.edu/apply 

IllinoisState.edu/visit 
Email: admissions@IllinoisState.edu 

STUDENT CLASSIFICATIONS 

Beginning Freshman: The following will classify a stu- 
dent as a new beginning freshman. 

1. A person who has never attended any college or 
university since graduating from high school. Students 
earning college hours while in high school will be 
classified as a new beginning freshman. 



2. A person who enrolls at any college or university 
during the summer term between high school gradua- 
tion and the subsequent fall term at Illinois State 
University will be classified as a beginning freshman. 

3. A person who graduates early from high school and 
attends a college or university during the spring term 
and begins at Illinois State the following fall will be 
considered a beginning freshman if the high school 
transcript posts the graduation date as May or June. 

Transfer Student: The following will classify a student as a 
transfer student. 

1 . A person who has enrolled at any college or universi- 
ty, after graduating from high school, whether or not any 
work was completed. (Except for students who classify 
as Beginning Freshman under number 2 and 3 under the 
Beginning Freshman section.) 

2. A person who graduates early from high school and 
attends a college or university during the spring term 
and begins at Illinois State the following fall will be 
considered a transfer student if the high school tran- 
script posts the graduation date as January. 

Former Illinois State Student/Readmit: A person who 
wishes to return to Illinois State after one or more semes- 
ters away from campus. 

Visiting Student/Unclassified Undergraduate: A person 
who does not have a bachelor degree and desires to take 
classes at the University without working toward a degree. 

International Student: A person who is neither a United 
States citizen nor a United States permanent resident. 

Undocumented Student: A person who lives in the United 
States with no documentation stating U.S. citizenship or 
legal residency. 

The following sections outline the admissions guidelines 
for the admission categories previously listed. Please note 
that catalog year does not govern admission requirements to 
the University or to an individual's specific major. These 
requirements can change every year based upon the competi- 
tiveness of the applicant pool and the space availability at 
the University and in each major program. Only graduation 
requirements are governed by catalog year. 

FRESHMAN ADMISSION 

Illinois State considers the following when making an 
admission decision: 

Grade point average 
• ACT/SAT scores 

High school transcript (including grade trends and rigor 
of courses completed) 
Academic Personal Statement 
The academic personal statement should be approxi- 
mately 500 words and needs to address the following: 



Considering ISU? 



15 



a. State why you feel Illinois State University is a 
good fit for your educational goals. 

b. Identify and explain your academic strengths and 
weaknesses. 

c. Explain any circumstances which affected your high 
school academic performance, if applicable. 

Applicants must also show successful completion of the fol- 
lowing: 

English - 4 years 

Mathematics - 3 years (algebra, geometry, algebra II) 

Natural science - 2 years with laboratories 

Social science - 2 years 

*Foreign language/Fine arts - 2 years of one foreign 

language or 2 years of fine arts 

• Electives - 2 years 

Deficiencies are not allowed in any subject area 

♦NOTE: All graduates of the College of Arts and 
Sciences must satisfy a foreign language graduation 
requirement that may be met by: 3 years of one foreign 
language in high school or completion of the second 
semester or higher of college-level foreign language with 
a passing grade or equivalent proficiency as determined 
by examination. Students who have completed one 
semester of college foreign language credit may elect to 
satisfy this requirement by studying abroad in an 
approved program in a non-English speaking country. 
American Sign Language may be used to fulfill this 
requirement by transfer credit or by proficiency. 

General Equivalency Diploma in Lieu of High School 
Diploma 

Applicants who use general equivalency diploma 
(GED) test results in lieu of a high school diploma are 
required to submit GED test results reflecting the standard 
of 410 on each of the five tests and an average battery 
score of 450. Applicants must also submit ACT or SAT 
results as well as an academic personal statement. 

FINALIZING ADMISSION 

Admission decisions are conditional until high school 
graduation and academic preparation is verified on final 
transcripts. Admission may be revoked if satisfactory 
completion of minimum course specific requirements 
and graduation are not confirmed by the high school 
transcript. 

• Withholding information or giving false information to 
the University may make a student ineligible for 
admission to the University or subject to dismissal. 

TRANSFER ADMISSION 

Illinois State considers the following when making 
admission decisions: 

• Cumulative college grade point average and, for some 
academic programs, prerequisite college coursework 
(view the Transfer and Readmit Major Admission 



Guide at www.admissions.ilstu.edu/transfer/require- 
ments) for these requirements. 
Good academic standing from last school attended. 
If less than 24 college semester hours completed at the 
time of application, high school courses, high school 
grade point average, and ACT/SAT scores. 

• Proof of high school graduation or a passing score on 
GED exam, if requested. 

Optional: an academic personal statement explaining 
circumstances that affected collegiate academic perfor- 
mance. 

• Illinois State requires all students to have a declared 
major upon completion of 75 hours. Due to this policy, 
transfer students are encouraged to apply to a major pro- 
gram of study. Transfer students with a high amount of 
transfer credit will be carefully reviewed and evaluated 
on a case by case basis for admissibility to the 
University and to their intended major. 

Illinois State generally uses all grades shown on all 
college transcripts to determine an admission grade point 
average. However, for repeated courses, only the last 
repeated grade will be used in calculating the grade point 
average for admission. Remedial (non-credit) course 
work is not used in calculating the admission GPA. 

NOTE: An Associate in Arts or Associate in Science degree 
does not guarantee admission. 

FINALIZING ADMISSION 

Admission decisions are conditional until final tran- 
scripts are received and satisfactory completion of 
courses is confirmed Admission may be revoked if 
this information is not verified by the final official 
transcript(s). 

• Withholding information or giving false information to 
the University may make a student ineligible for 
admission to the University or subject to dismissal. 

Transferability of Course Credit 

• After official transcripts from all previously attended 
universities are received and soon after admission to 
Illinois State, the Office of the University Registrar will 
send you a Statement of Transfer Credit indicating how 
each course transfers and how it has been used to fulfill 
Illinois State's curricular requirements. Transfer credit 
from community colleges is limited to 66 semester 
hours, plus four credits of physical education courses; 
credit from four-year colleges and universities is limited 
to 90 semester hours. Additional credit for military ser- 
vice may be considered. 

Students who have completed an A.A. or A.S. from any 
regionally accredited post secondary institution or the 
Illinois Articulation Initiative General Education Core 
Curriculum (1AI GECC) at an accredited, participating 
Illinois college or university, will be considered to have 
met the Illinois State University General Education 



16 



Considering ISU? 



requirements. Students completing an A.A. or A.S. will 
also have junior class standing. Illinois State University 
accepts the AAT degree as a baccalaureate-oriented 
degree when the AAT degree includes the IAI transfer- 
able core. For more information regarding the IAI GECC 
visit www.iTransfer.org. 

• Transfer students who transfer credit from participat- 
ing Illinois colleges or universities that satisfies some 
but not all requirements of the IAI GECC may satisfy 
Illinois State General Education requirements by 
completing requirements for the IAI GECC at Illinois 
State or by completing the University's own General 
Education program. Other students must complete 
Illinois State's General Education program. 

Illinois State generally accepts transfer courses with 
earned grades of D. However, certain courses in some 
major programs may require a grade of C or better. 
When a student who pursues one of these majors trans- 
fers D grade course credit that is equated to an Illinois 
State course requiring a grade of C or better, the stu- 
dent will have to repeat the course to satisfy the major 
program requirements. 

SECOND BACHELOR'S DEGREE 

A student who has already received one bachelor's 
degree from Illinois State University, or from another 
regionally accredited college or university, may receive a 
second bachelor's degree at Illinois State University upon 
completion of degree requirements. Students must meet the 
admission requirements for the major selected and meet 
appropriate deadlines. 

For the degree, all specified graduation requirements at 
the time of admission to the program for the second degree 
must be met, and the program of studies completed for the 
second degree must include at least 32 semester hours of 
course work taken after the granting of the first degree, of 
which 30 hours must be taken in residence at Illinois State. 
At least 24 of the 32 hours offered toward the second 
degree must be senior college-level courses numbered 200 
and above. 

PROGRAM SPECIFIC 
ADMISSION CRITERIA 

Illinois State University regulates admission to desig- 
nated programs when the number of students seeking 
admission exceeds the available educational resources of 
the department or school. Supplementary selection crite- 
ria for admission may need to be met for specific majors. 
These criteria may be based on scholastic achievement, 
prerequisite course work, and/or may consist of auditions, 
portfolios, work experience, etc. Selection criteria can be 
obtained from www.FindYourMajor.ilstu.edu, the Office 
of Admissions (for new students), or the intended major 
department or school advisor. 



FORMER ILLINOIS STATE 
STUDENTS SEEKING READMISSION 

Students who have been absent from the University 
for one or more semesters must apply for readmission. 
Early application is encouraged as it may not be possible 
to offer readmission for the term requested due to space 
limitations. Readmitted students should consult the sec- 
tion on Undergraduate Catalog Requirements to deter- 
mine which catalog should be used to determine grad- 
uation requirements. 

Illinois State considers the following when making 
decisions on readmission: 

Students must have left Illinois State University in 
good academic standing. 

• If coursework is completed since leaving Illinois State, 
a minimum 2.00 GPA is required for all college 
coursework completed and good academic standing 
must be shown from the last institution attended. 
Please note that many majors require higher GPA stan- 
dards and prerequisite college coursework for admis- 
sion. Visit www.Admissions.ilstu.edu/returning/ to 
view the Transfer and Readmit Major Admission 
Guide for these requirements. 

If on probation or dismissed, students may be consid- 
ered for reinstatement or for the New Start readmission 
program. Supplemental information may be requested to 
determine eligibility. 

Visit www.admissions.ilstu.edu/returning/ to learn more 
about these readmission options. 

If dismissed for disciplinary reasons, students should 
contact the Community Rights and Responsibilities 
Office for disciplinary clearance. Readmission cannot 
be considered until clearance is given. 

New Start Policy: Students who leave Illinois State in 
a degree program with less than a 2.00 cumulative grade- 
point average (GPA) may be considered for readmission 
through the New Start Policy. Applicants admitted through 
this policy will begin with a new cumulative GPA calculat- 
ed from the point of their reentry. 

Students may be considered for readmission through 
the New Start Policy after being away from the 
University for one full year (Example: A student who last 
attended the University the Fall 2009 term cannot reenroll 
through the New Start Policy until the Spring 2011 term.) 
and only when the requirements of one of the following 
New Start categories are met: Nontraditional Student, 
Veteran, or Community College Transfer. These cate- 
gories are described in detail in the Academic Policies 
and Practices section under the heading "Additional 
Academic Requirements" in this catalog and on the 
Admissions Website. 

The application process includes the submission of the 
application for admission, official academic transcripts 
from all schools attended since leaving Illinois State, and a 
statement describing potential to do well academically as 
described in the application. In some cases, additional sup- 



porting documents may be requested. Students are strongly 
encouraged to file an application as soon as possible dur- 
ing the preferred filing period for the term for which they 
are applying. Application deadlines are posted on the 
Admissions Website at IllinoisState.edu/admissions. 

Students may exercise New Start only once. Such 
students will have "New Start" indicated on their tran- 
script. New Start will affect only the cumulative GPA. 
All grades earned at Illinois State, regardless of when 
earned, will be used in the calculation of the major GPA, 
the minor GPA, and graduation honors. Students who are 
admitted through the New Start Policy will be admitted 
on academic probation and be required to participate in 
Project Success. (See the Academic Policies and 
Practices section for further information). Students who 
reenter under the New Start Policy must follow the 
Undergraduate Catalog in effect at the time of reentry. 
To be eligible for graduation, a student must earn at least 
30 semester hours at Illinois State University after exer- 
cising New Start. 



VISITING STUDENT/UNCLASSIFIED 
ADMISSION 

Individuals desiring to take a class or classes at 
Illinois State as a visitor without working toward a specif- 
ic degree at Illinois State may be admitted as unclassified 
students. Applicants may be required to provide evidence 
showing prerequisite background for the course(s) 
desired. Unclassified students must maintain the same 
standard of performance as degree-seeking students. 
Unclassified students who wish to become candidates for 
a degree at some later time must apply for admission as a 
degree seeking students and must meet published require- 
ments for admission into the desired program. Students 
who hold a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accred- 
ited college or university are not eligible for the unclassified 
undergraduate status. They must apply as a graduate 
Student-at-Large. 

Adult Learner Program: All persons 25 years of age 
or older prior to the first day of class for any given semester 
may be considered for admission as an Adult Learner. 
Admission as an Adult Learner is an unclassified/non- 
degree seeking student status. Freshmen may be admitted 
without presenting ACT or SAT scores and without proof of 
high school diploma and/or GED. Transfer students may be 
admitted without submitting transcripts from schools previ- 
ously attended if they have not been in attendance at a col- 
lege or university two years prior to the semester for which 
they have applied. If attendance has been within two years, 
students must submit transcripts indicating a cumulative grade 
point average of 2.00 on a 4.00 scale and be in good standing 
at the last school attended. Adult Learners who, at some later 
time, wish to become candidates for a degree must complete a 
minimum of 12 semester hours at Illinois State, apply for 
admission as a degree seeking student, and meet university 
admission requirements for the desired program. 



Considering ISU? 17 

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ADMISSION 

Application Deadlines: Filing deadlines for interna- 
tional student applications are March 1 for the summer or fall 
semester, and September 1 for the spring semester. 

Materials and Procedures: In addition to the com- 
pleted application for admission, the following materials 
are required: 

1. Official academic records verified with seals and 
signatures sent directly from the school or examina- 
tions council. 

2. Official Test of English as a Foreign Language 
(TOEFL) score report sent directly from Educational 
Testing Service in Princeton, New Jersey or official test 
score of the International English Language Testing 
System (IELTS) sent directly from the testing center 
that administered the test. Applicants whose native lan- 
guage is English are exempted from the requirement. 

3. Declaration of finances showing source of support 
and official documentation of funds available for the 
first year's expenses is required for all students seek- 
ing F-l status. 

Upon receipt of all necessary materials, the Office of 
Admissions will review the application file for an admission 
decision. Students who are admitted will be sent a 
Certificate of Eligibility for Non-immigrant (F- 1 ) Student 
Status with the notification of acceptance. 

During orientation week, new international students' 
written communication skills will be evaluated. The 
University will administer a test for placement in English 
101, Composition as Critical Inquiry, a course required of 
all Illinois State students. Testing for other skills may be 
administered to determine placement in a sequence or 
course of the student's choice. 

Freshman Eligibility: International students who 
meet all of the following criteria are eligible to apply as an 
undergraduate freshman student: 

1. Earned the equivalent of a U.S. high school diploma 
from a recognized international institution of sec- 
ondary or high school level, or will do so within one 
academic year of application. 

2. Shown academic achievement equal to a U.S. grade 
point average of C or better (2.00 on a 4.00 scale) in 
courses that reflect proficiencies in basic skill areas. 

3. Earned a total score of 79 on the internet based test 
(iBT), 550 on the pencil/paper test or 213 on the com- 
puter based Test of English as a Foreign Language 
(TOEFL), or earned a total score of 6.5 on the 
International English Language Testing (IELTS) assess- 
ment. International students may substitute ACT or 
SAT scores as described for United States applicants. 

4. International applicants who meet all other academic 
criteria for admission but whose scores do not meet 



18 



Considering ISU? 



the minimum standards in item 3 above may be admit- 
ted to a degree program. In such cases, students will be 
required to attend courses at the English Language 
Institute (ELI) at their own expense and remain in the 
program until their English proficiency improves to the 
level required for University enrollment. 

Transfer Eligibility: International students who meet all 
of the following criteria are eligible to apply as undergraduate 
transfer students: 

1. Earned credit at an accredited international or U.S. 
institution of higher education or will do so within one 
year of application. 

2. Shown academic achievement equal to U.S. grade 
point average of C or better (2.00 on a 4.00 scale). 
NOTE: Some departments have higher than the mini- 
mum standard for transfer admission. Refer to 
www.admissions.ilstu.edu/transfer/requirements for a 
link to the Transfer Admission Guide. 

3. Earned a total score of 79 on the internet based test 
(iBT), 550 on the pencil/paper test or 213 on the com- 
puter based Test Of English as a Foreign Language 
(TOEFL), or earned a total score of 6.5 on the 
International English Language Testing (IELTS) 
assessment. This requirement is waived for students 
who acquire 60 semester hours while attending a col- 
lege or university located in the U.S. if the student has 
resided in the U.S. for at least one year at the time of 
admission. 

4. International applicants who meet all other academic 
criteria for admission but whose scores do not meet the 
minimum standards in item 3 above may be admitted 
to a degree program. In such cases, students will be 
required to attend courses at the English Language 
Institute (ELI) at their own expense and remain in the 
program until their English proficiency improves to the 
level required for University enrollment. 

SPECIAL ADMISSION PROGRAMS 

The University may admit a limited number of appli- 
cants with special characteristics and abilities who show the 
potential for success in collegiate work but who do not meet 
all the regular admission standards. The special admissions 
programs are as follows: 

Adult Learner Program: All persons 25 years of 
age or older prior to the first day of class for any given 
semester may be considered for admission as an Adult 
Learner. See the Unclassified area of the Admission 
Policies section. 

Dual Enrollment Program: Offers qualified high 
school students an opportunity to take college-level class- 
es. Dual Enrollment students are evaluated on a case-by- 
case basis. If admitted, they are given unclassified student 
status. They cannot be full-time students while still in 
high school and must take classes offered on campus. 



Talent Program: Applicants who demonstrate an out- 
standing talent in art, music, theatre, or athletics. 

Veterans' Program: Applicants who were Illinois resi- 
dents at the time of entrance into the Armed Forces, who 
present a discharge for other than dishonorable reasons 
showing completion of at least a one-year active tour of duty 
in the Armed Forces, and whose first attendance at a college 
or university after discharge is at Illinois State can be con- 
sidered for admission through this program. 

Inquiries regarding these programs should be direct- 
ed to the Office of Admissions, 201 Hovey Hall, Illinois 
State University, Campus Box 2200, Normal, IL 61790- 
2200, (800) 366-2478 or admissions@ilstu.edu and 
should specify the particular program of interest. 

IMMUNIZATION AND MEDICAL 
REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL STUDENTS 

All students admitted to Illinois State University are 
required, by Public Act 85-1315 to provide proof of 
immunity for tetanus, diphtheria, measles, mumps, and 
rubella. Documentation of immunity must be complete 
and on file in the Student Health Services by the 15 th cal- 
endar day of the entering semester (8 th day summer). 
Proof of immunity must include a tetanus/diphtheria 
booster within 10 years of attendance at Illinois State; 
two measles immunizations, both after one year of age 
and after December 31, 1968; one mumps immunization 
after one year of age and after December 31, 1967; one 
rubella immunization after one year of age and after 
December 31, 1968. All immunization dates must be 
signed/certified by a physician or public health official. 

Please note that a physical examination is not 
required. International students are required by 
University regulations to have TB screening within 10 
days of their arrival on campus. The Student Health 
Service strongly recommends that all students have 
immunization against Hepatitis B (a series of three injec- 
tions), immunization against bacterial meningitis, and a 
second immunization against mumps. 

Information and further instructions for meeting the 
stated requirements will be provided via future commu- 
nication from Student Health Services for all incoming 
students. Student Health Services recommends comple- 
tion of the immunization information as soon as possible. 
Students not in compliance with the immunization 
requirements by the deadline will have subsequent 
semester registrations blocked and be assessed an admin- 
istrative non-compliance fee. 

Further information can be obtained by calling the 
Student Health Services Health Information Management 
department at (309) 438-7559 or by visiting the Website 
at www.shs.ilstu.edu. 



Considering ISU? 



19 



Financial Aid 

Between 70 and 75 percent of all students who attend 
the University receive some sort of financial aid in the form 
of loans, scholarships, tuition waivers, grants and employ- 
ment. In addition to funds received through gift aid and 
loans, many Illinois State students seek employment to help 
cover expenses. 

Students interested in applying for financial assistance 
may contact the Financial Aid Office, which annually 
administers and coordinates more than 135 million dollars 
provided to students. 

FINANCIAL AID OFFICE 

231 Fell Hall, (309) 438-2231 
IllinoisState.edu/financialaid 

All students are encouraged to apply for financial aid 
by completing the Free Application for Federal Student 
Aid (FAFSA). This application determines eligibility for 
state, federal and institutional financial aid, including 
student loans. 

General Information 

Financial aid counselors are available Monday through 
Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. for telephone and walk-in 
service when the University is open. In addition, you may 
access information on the Financial Aid Office Website at 
www.IllinoisState.edu/financialaid. Information on the 
Website includes: 

— Office hours, phone number and location; information 
concerning the application process, cost of attendance 
and aid programs available to students; 

— FAFSA on the Web, which allows you to file the Free 
Application for Federal Student Aid electronically; 

— Financial Aid forms and worksheets available to 
download; 

— Scholarship searches; 

— Important dates for your calendar; 

— A link to Illinois State's iCampus portal so that you can 
check the status and progress of your aid application. 
iCampus also allows you to register for classes, confirm 
attendance, view grades, schedule, textbooks, email, 
Redbird card balance and more through a Web browser 
from anywhere in the world. In addition, you can verify 
and/or update your address information on file with the 
Office of the University Registrar; 

— Entrance and Exit Loan Counseling; 

— The Student Guide - financial aid information from the 
U. S. Department of Education; 

— Commonly asked questions and answers. 

Using email at FinancialAid@IllinoisState.edu is 
another way to contact the Financial Aid office. You will 
receive a response within two business days. 



Institutional and Financial Assistance Information for 
Students 

The law (the Higher Education Act of 1965, as 
amended, and regulation 34 CFR 668) requires Illinois 
State University to notify enrolled students and the par- 
ents of dependent enrolled students annually of the avail- 
ability of the following information: 

— your rights under the Family Education Rights and 
Privacy Act; 

- your right to a deferment of repayment of your Federal 
Direct Loan for Peace Corps or volunteer service; 

- financial aid available at Illinois State University; 

— information about Illinois State University; 

- the graduation rate of degree-seeking, full-time under- 
graduate students at Illinois State University; 

— an annual campus security report; and, 

— a report on athletic program participation and financial 
support data. 

General Eligibility Criteria 

To qualify for federal or state financial aid programs, 
you must: 

1 . be a United States citizen or have resident alien status; 

2. complete and submit the Free Application for Federal 
Student Aid (FAFSA) to the federal processor either 
on paper or on line; 

3. be enrolled for a minimum of 6 hours (half-time status) 
per semester (Students not pursuing a degree or unclas- 
sified students are not eligible for financial aid, includ- 
ing loans.); not be in default on a Perkins Loan or any 
federally guaranteed loan; 

4. not owe a repayment to a federal grant program; 

5. make satisfactory progress toward a degree as defined 
by Illinois State University (See Satisfactory Academic 
Progress); and 

6. be registered with Selective Service, if you are a male 
at least 18 years of age, born after 1959, and not cur- 
rently an active member of the U.S. Armed Forces. 

NOTE: A student may not receive federal or state 
financial aid from more than one institution at the 
same time. 

APPLICATION PROCEDURES 

To be considered for financial aid at Illinois State 
University, you must complete and submit the Free 
Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), or the 
Renewal FAFSA, based on the following time table: 

In November - Renewal aid applicants will be sent 
an email notification for FAFSA on the Web if they pro- 
vided a valid email address on the current year's 
FAFSA. 

In January or February - Complete the FAFSA on the 
Web at www.fafsa.ed.gov using your PIN. If you do not 
already have a PIN, you can apply for one by going to the 
Website www.pin.ed.gov. 



20 



Considering ISU? 



The priority FAFSA filing date for Illinois State 
University is March 1, each year. The federal processor 
must receive your application by this date to insure your 
application receives full consideration for all financial aid 
programs. If your FAFSA is received after March 1, you 
will be considered for financial aid programs for which 
you are eligible and that have remaining funds. 

If you or your parents (if you are a dependent student) 
have not completed your federal tax return by March 1 , you 
can still apply on time by indicating on the FAFSA that you 
will file but have not yet completed your tax return. 

In March or April - After you receive your Student 
Aid Report, you must review it for accuracy. You can then 
make any necessary corrections based on your and/or your 
parents' tax return information. 

The income and asset information provided on the 
FAFSA determines your financial aid eligibility. Be sure to 
use Illinois State's Title IV school code: 001692. There is no 
separate institutional application for financial aid at Illinois 
State. You will need to submit an additional application for 
summer aid (see Financial Aid for Summer Session). 

Financial Aid for the Summer Session: If you are 

enrolled for at least six hours of coursework, you may apply 
for financial aid. The application form for the Summer 
Session will be available at the Financial Aid Office, 231 
Fell Hall, and in the Forms and Publications section of the 
IllinoisState.edu/financialaid Website in early March. 

Data from your FAFSA will be used to determine your 
eligibility for aid for the summer session. Aid funds for the 
summer session are very limited. Direct Loan funds are 
available only if you have remaining loan eligibility for your 
class level. 

Institutional Quality Assurance Program (IQAP): 

Illinois State University is a participant in the U.S. 
Department of Education's Institutional Quality Assurance 
Program. It is important that you keep copies of federal tax 
returns and W2s, including those of your parents if you 
apply as a dependent student, because Department of 
Education regulations require the Financial Aid Office to 
verify the accuracy of financial data for selected aid appli- 
cants. If your application is selected for review under this 
program, you will be notified in writing and asked to pro- 
vide the above documents. It is important that you respond 
within the specified time frame. Otherwise, processing of 
your financial aid, including loans, may be delayed. 

FEDERAL GRANTS AND BENEFITS 

Federal grants and benefits are considered "gift aid," and 
do not need to be repaid. Grants commonly received by 
Illinois State students are: 

Federal Pell Grant: Eligibility is determined by the 
information provided on your FAFSA and is based on the 
calculated Expected Family Contribution (EFC) on your 
Student Aid Report. 



Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity 
Grant (FSEOG): This grant is awarded to students with 
exceptional financial need. At Illinois State, the award is 
$ 1 ,000 per academic year. You must be enrolled for a mini- 
mum of six hours per semester to receive this grant. 

Survivors' and Dependents' Educational Assistance 
Program: Survivors (spouse and/or children) of veterans, 
whose deaths or permanent, total disabilities occurred during 
service, may be eligible for benefits if the veteran served since 
the Spanish- American War. Children of veterans missing-in- 
action or prisoners of war for more than 90 days are also eligi- 
ble for this benefit. For details, contact the Illinois State 
University Office of Veterans Services, 1 12 Moulton Hall. 

Veterans' G.I. Bill: Students who have served in the 
U.S. Armed Forces should contact the Illinois State 
University Office of Veterans Services, 112 Moulton Hall, 
for additional details. 

The Academic Competitiveness Grant: The Academic 
Competitiveness Grant is for freshmen and sophomore stu- 
dents. This grant is in addition to the Pell Grant award, and 
provides up to $750 for the first year of undergraduate study 
and up to $1,300 for the second year of undergraduate study. 
Recipients must be full-time students, U.S citizens, eligible 
for a Federal Pell Grant, and have successfully completed a 
rigorous high school program (as determined by the state or 
local education agency and recognized by the Secretary of 
Education). Second year students must also have a cumula- 
tive grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.00. 

The National Science and Mathematics Access to 
Retain Talent Grant (National SMART Grant): 

The National Science and Mathematics Access to Retain 
Talent Grant, also known as the National SMART Grant, 
is available during the junior and senior years of under- 
graduate study. This grant is in addition to the student's 
Pell Grant award, and will provide up to $4,000 per year, 
for a maximum of two years. Recipients must be full-time 
students, U.S. citizens, eligible for the Federal Pell Grant, 
and maintaining at least a 3.00 GPA in one of the following 
majors at Illinois State University: Biochemistry- 
Molecular Biology, Biological Sciences, Chemistry, 
Computer Science, Geology, Industrial Technology, 
Information Systems, Mathematics, Physics, 
Telecommunications. Students must also have maintained 
a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.00 
in coursework required for the major. 

ILLINOIS STATE UNIVERSITY GRANTS 

Student-to-Student Grant: All Illinois residents who 
meet the March 1 preferential filing date for the FAFSA 
and who are ISAC MAP Grant eligible (see the following 
section) are automatically considered for this program as 
part of the application process. The maximum STS grant 
is $500 and the combination of STS and the Federal 
Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant cannot 
exceed $1,000. 



Considering ISU? 



21 



MAP Supplemental Grant: All Illinois residents who 
are ISAC MAP Grant eligible (see the following section) are 
automatically considered for this program as part of the 
application process. The maximum supplemental grant is the 
difference between the maximum MAP grant and tuition and 
fees for 15 credit hours. 

STATE SCHOLARSHIPS AND GRANTS 

Department of Rehabilitation Services: Public Law 
113 mandates federal and state governments to provide 
rehabilitation services to anyone with a disability the 
opportunity to pursue post-secondary education. This grant 
is applied to tuition, fees, and/or maintenance costs. For 
more information or assistance in the application process, 
Illinois State students with a disability should contact the 
Department of Rehabilitation Services; 207 S. Prospect 
Road, Bloomington, IL, (309) 662-1347. 

You and/or your parents must meet residency require- 
ments based on regulations from the Illinois Student 
Assistance Commission (ISAC) to be eligible for the fol- 
lowing programs. 

Monetary Award Program (ISAC MAP Grant): If 

you are enrolled for at least six hours of coursework, meet 
residency requirements, and have eligibility for this award 
based on your Expected Family Contribution, this grant 
will be applied directly to your tuition and fees charges. 

Illinois Incentive for Access (HA) Grant: You are 

eligible for this $500 grant if you are classified as a fresh- 
man, a resident of Illinois, and your Expected Family 
Contribution (EPC) based on FAFSA data is zero (0). 
This grant is for one academic year and can be used for 
any educational expense. 

State of Illinois ROTC Scholarship: You may apply 
for this scholarship through the Military Science 
Department if you are a full-time student enrolled in a 
Military Science course. This competitive award will 
credit all tuition charges as well as the general activity 
fee. You would be responsible for the remainder of your 
fee charges. You would be able to retain this scholarship 
for up to eight semesters as long as criteria are met. 
Freshmen and sophomores may use this scholarship with- 
out incurring a military service obligation. 

General Assembly Scholarships: You should contact 
your State Senator or State Representative to be considered 
for this scholarship. Your tuition and general activity fees 
are credited by this scholarship. Typically, this scholarship is 
for one academic year. 

University Employee Dependent Partial Tuition 
Waiver: If you are under the age of 25 and your parent is 
employed at Illinois State, Northern Illinois, Chicago 
State, Eastern Illinois, Governors State, Western Illinois, 
or Northeastern Illinois University, or campuses of the 
University of Illinois, or Southern Illinois University, you 
may be eligible for this tuition waiver. Your parent 



should contact the Human Resources Office at the univer- 
sity where he or she is employed for the application and 
specific employment requirements. 

Consult the Illinois Student Assistance Commission 

Website, www.collegezone.com, or call 1-800-899-ISAC to 
obtain additional information about the following scholar- 
ships, including how to apply and application deadlines. 

Illinois National Guard Grant: If you are an active 
member of the Illinois National Guard (Army or Air) you 
may have eligibility for this grant. In order to receive this 
grant, you must be enrolled at an ISAC-approved Illinois 
public community college or a four-year college or uni- 
versity; be registered for Selective Service (if you are 
male); not be in default of any student loan nor owe 
a repayment of any state or federal grant; and maintain 
an acceptable grade point average (GPA) determined by 
the institution. 

You must be enrolled for at least one hour of course- 
work and apply annually to the Illinois Student 
Assistance Commission, meeting the stated application 
deadline. If you are eligible, this grant will be applied to 
your tuition and partial fee charges. Applications may be 
obtained from the Illinois Student Assistance 
Commission Website at www.collegezone.com or by 
calling 1-800-899-ISAC. 

Illinois Veteran Grant (IVG): If you served in the 
Armed Forces for at least one year and received an honor- 
able discharge, you may qualify for the Illinois Veteran 
Grant. In addition to residing in Illinois for at least six 
months before entering the service, you must return to 
Illinois within six months after your discharge. 

You may obtain your one-time application from the 
Illinois Student Assistance Commission (ISAC) Website, 
www.collegezone.com or by calling 1-800-899-ISAC. 
You must meet the application deadline and provide a 
copy of your DD 214 with your application to ISAC. In 
addition, you must submit a copy of your DD 214 to both 
the Financial Aid Office and the Office of Veterans 
Services at Illinois State. 

When your application is approved by ISAC, you will 
be sent a Notice of Eligibility letter. The original letter must 
be submitted to the Scholarship Resource Office. Your IVG 
will credit your tuition charges as well as partial fee charges. 

Merit Recognition Scholarship (MRS): If you are in 

the top 2.5% of your Illinois high school senior class, a 
U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen and a resident of 
Illinois, you will be nominated by your high school to 
ISAC, which will send you an application. Be sure you fol- 
low the directions and meet the application deadline. In 
order to receive this scholarship, you must attend an ISAC- 
approved post-secondary institution in Illinois or one of the 
U. S. Military Academies. This scholarship is subject to 
funding by the Illinois General Assembly and has not been 
funded since the 2004-2005 academic year. 



22 



Considering ISU: 



Illinois Special Education Teacher Tuition Waiver 

(SETTW): To be eligible for the SETTW, you must be a 
U.S. citizen or an eligible non-citizen residing in Illinois who 
is ranked in the upper half of your Illinois high school gradu- 
ating class, and meet the application deadline. In addition, 
you must be enrolled in a special education program at one 
of the twelve public four-year post-secondary institutions in 
Illinois after taking the ACT or SAT college admissions 
exam. Recipients must begin teaching, on a full-time basis in 
the field of Special Education, within one year following 
graduation from or termination of enrollment in a teacher 
education program, at an Illinois non-profit public, private, 
or parochial preschool, elementary or secondary school and 
continue teaching for at least two of the five years immedi- 
ately following. 

Illinois Future Teacher Corps (IFTC) Program: To 

be eligible you must be a U.S. citizen or an eligible non-citi- 
zen, a resident of Illinois, a high school graduate or hold a 
GED, and you cannot be in default on any student loan or 
owe a refund on any state or federal grant. In addition, you 
must be enrolled at least half-time at the junior level or 
above and be pursuing a postsecondary course of study lead- 
ing to initial certification in a teaching discipline or a teacher 
shortage discipline or pursuing additional course work need- 
ed to gain Illinois State Board of Education approval to teach 
in an approved specialized area in which a teacher shortage 
exists. The shortage areas are determined each year by 
the state and are subject to change each year. You must 
also file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid to be 
considered for this scholarship. Recipients must teach, on a 
full-time basis, for five years according to the 
commitment/agreement that was signed prior to receiving 
the program benefits, e.g., if the recipient made a commit- 
ment to teach in a teacher shortage discipline and/or at a hard 
to staff school, the five years of teaching must be fulfilled 
accordingly. The teaching must be fulfilled at an Illinois 
public, private or parochial preschool or an Illinois public 
elementary or secondary school. This is a five year commit- 
ment no matter the amount of the scholarship received. 

Minority Teachers of Illinois Scholarship: To be eli- 
gible you must be a minority student, a U.S. citizen or per- 
manent resident of the United States, a resident of Illinois, a 
high school graduate or hold a GED, and you cannot be in 
default on any student loan nor owe a refund on any state or 
federal grant. In addition, you must be enrolled or accepted 
for enrollment on at least a half-time basis as an undergradu- 
ate or graduate student and be enrolled or accepted for 
enrollment in a course of study which, upon completion, 
qualifies the student to be certified as a preschool, elemen- 
tary or secondary school teacher by the Illinois State Board 
of Education. The student must maintain a cumulative grade 
point average of no less than 2.50 on a 4.00 scale, and main- 
tain satisfactory progress as determined by the institution. 
Recipients must teach, on a full-time basis, for one year at a 
nonprofit Illinois preschool, elementary, or secondary school 
for each year of assistance received. 



PRIVATE SCHOLARSHIPS 

Many students utilize private scholarships to supple- 
ment their financial aid award package. You may also con- 
tact clubs, foundations, organizations, corporations and 
churches from your hometown for scholarships. The schol- 
arship donor determines the eligibility criteria. You are 
encouraged to use the Illinois State University Scholarship 
page on the Financial Aid Office home page at 
IllinoisState.edu/financialaid or the Illinois Student 
Assistance Commission's CollegeZone.com. Avoid search 
services or "consultants" who charge a significant fee 
and/or promise positive results. 

ILLINOIS STATE UNIVERSITY MERIT- 
BASED SCHOLARSHIPS 

Varieties of merit-based scholarships are awarded to 
new beginning freshmen and transfer students. In order to 
be considered for a merit-based scholarship as a new stu- 
dent, applicants must be admitted to the University and 
submit the appropriate scholarship documentation by the 
scholarship deadline. 

For more information about merit-based scholarships 
for new students and for a scholarship application, please 
contact the Office of Admissions by telephone at (800) 
366-2478 or visit the Office of Admissions Website at 
IllinoisState.edu/admissions. In addition, the Scholarship 
Resource Office, housed within the Financial Aid Office, 
will assist students in their search for private or institutional 
scholarship dollars. Contact the Scholarship Resource Office 
by telephone at (309) 438-2740. 

Presidential Scholarships: Presidential Scholarships are 
our most prestigious scholarships for incoming freshmen. 
Recipients of these scholarships are chosen on the basis of 
academic accomplishments, scores on college admissions tests 
(ACT/SAT), demonstrated leadership qualities, evidence of 
commitment to service, as well as an on-campus interview. 
Presidential Scholars receive an annual $8,000 award, renew- 
able for up to eight semesters, contingent on the student's con- 
tinued attainment of a 3.30 cumulative grade point average 
(GPA) and satisfactory progress in the Presidential Scholars 
Program. Finalists in National Merit and National 
Achievement Program competitions who enroll as Presidential 
Scholars and who list Illinois State as their first-choice school 
receive an additional $2,000 for the freshman year. The appli- 
cation for admission to the University, submitted during the 
preferred filing period, will determine eligibility to apply for 
the Presidential Scholarship. Qualified applicants will be sent 
an invitation to apply for the scholarship on a rolling basis 
beginning mid October. Recent Presidential Scholars have an 
average grade point average of 4.30 on a 4.00 scale, have 
ACT composite scores in the lower 30s and higher, and 
demonstrate other meritorious traits as evidenced by their 
overall high school records. For more information, contact the 
Office of Admissions at (800) 366-2478 or visit the Office of 
Admissions Website at IllinoisState.edu/admissions. 



Considering ISU? 



23 



Deans' Scholarships: The Deans' Scholarship is a 
one-year monetary award of $1,000 for new beginning 
freshmen. The scholarship is based on academic accom- 
plishments and potential for outstanding achievement at the 
University. Candidates for Deans' Scholarships are identi- 
fied from the Presidential Scholarship applicant pool and 
are selected by the Dean of the College from which the 
scholarship is offered. 

University Scholarship: University Scholarships are 
awarded to academically talented new beginning fresh- 
men from traditionally underrepresented groups or first- 
generation college students facing the tough challenges of 
acquiring a college education. Recipients of these schol- 
arships are chosen on the basis of academic accomplish- 
ments, scores on college admissions tests (ACT/SAT), 
demonstrated leadership qualities, evidence of commit- 
ment to service, as well as an on-campus interview. The 
application for admission, submitted during the preferred 
filing period, will determine eligibility to apply for the 
University Scholarships. Qualified students will be sent 
an invitation to apply for the scholarship on a rolling 
basis beginning mid October. Recent University Scholars 
have earned a grade point average of 3.75 on a 4.00 scale 
and have ACT scores of 25 and higher. Award winners 
receive a $5,000 annual award, renewable for up to eight 
semesters, contingent upon the student's satisfactory 
progress in the University Scholars program. For more 
information, contact the Office of Admissions at (800) 
366-2478 or visit the Office of Admissions Website at 
IllinoisState.edu/admissions. 

Trustees' Tuition Waivers: Undergraduate tuition 
waivers are used to recruit talented students to the 
University in these specific areas: the Honors Program, 
Art, Communication/Forensics, Intercollegiate Athletics, 
International Studies, Music, and Theatre. Additional infor- 
mation regarding these waivers are available through the 
department from which the waivers are offered. 

Academic Scholarship Programs: Some academic 
departments offer scholarships to continuing students based 
on academic accomplishments. Your major or minor is 
used for eligibility. You can explore the availability of 
these scholarships by visiting the Financial Aid Office 
Website at www.financialaid.ilstu.edu/scholarships/. 

Community College Transfer Scholarships: 

Scholarships are available for academically talented, first- 
time community college transfer students at Illinois State. In 
order to be considered for the scholarship, students must 
have earned a minimum 3.50 cumulative grade point average 
at the time of application. In addition, students must com- 
plete an Associate in Arts or Associate in Science degree 
prior to enrolling at the University. The awards are valued at 
$750 per semester for two academic years. One award is 
designated for a member of Phi Theta Kappa, the academic 
honor society of community colleges. Applications are 
mailed in March to qualified admitted students enrolling for 



summer or fall terms and those attending the spring term. 
Recent award winners have an average community college 
grade point average of a 4.00 on a 4.00 scale. For more 
information, contact the Office of Admissions at (800) 366- 
2478 or visit the Office of Admissions Website at 
IllinoisState.edu/admissions. 

LOANS 

Federal Direct Student Loan Program: You must 
complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid 
(FAFSA) to receive a loan. The Financial Aid Office will 
determine your eligibility for all other aid programs prior to 
processing your loan. Because Illinois State is a participant 
in the Federal Direct Loan program, a loan application from 
a bank or other lender is not required. 

There are two kinds of direct loans: subsidized and 
unsubsidized. If you are eligible for the subsidized loan based 
on financial need, the interest on the loan is paid for you as 
long as you are enrolled half-time (a minimum of 6 hours per 
semester). The unsubsidized loan is not based on financial 
need and requires that you make quarterly interest payments 
on the loan while you are enrolled. If you choose to defer 
payments while you are in school, the interest will be added 
to the principal of your loan (capitalized). 

After your loan is processed, you will receive an award 
letter and information on completing an electronic Master 
Promissory Note (EMPN), if you have not already done so. 
Read the information carefully. Before loan proceeds will be 
credited to your account, the EMPN and loan counseling 
(see below) must be completed. 

Because of its participation in the Direct Loan program, 
Illinois State receives loan proceeds directly from the U.S. 
Department of Education. Your loan proceeds will be 
applied to your university charges. 

Loan Counseling: Students who are first-time Direct 
Loan borrowers are required to attend Federal Direct Loan 
entrance loan counseling before loan proceeds are credited 
to the student's account. You may meet this requirement by 
completing loan entrance counseling on the Web at 
IllinoisState.edu/financialaid. 

If you attended entrance counseling at another school, 
you must sign a statement verifying that you previously met 
the requirement. The purpose of entrance counseling is to 
inform you of your responsibilities and rights as a borrower. 

Exit Information: Before you graduate, or if your 
enrollment status drops below 6 hours per semester, you 
will be sent information concerning Direct Loan exit coun- 
seling, which outlines loan repayment, consolidation, and 
deferment options. You may also get this information from 
the Exit Counseling link from the Financial Aid Office 
Website, IllinoisState.edu/financialaid. Repayment of your 
Direct Loan begins six months after you leave the 
University or drop below half-time status. 



24 



Considering ISU? 



Federal Perkins Loan: The Federal Perkins Loan pro- 
gram is for students enrolled at least half-time in a degree 
program and gives priority to those students with exceptional 
financial need. For new borrowers after July 1, 1987, repay- 
ment and interest begins nine months after the student gradu- 
ates, leaves school, or drops below half-time. The 
cumulative loan limit is $20,000 for undergraduates and 
$30,000 for graduate students. The interest rate is five per- 
cent. These funds are awarded on a first-come basis to quali- 
fied applicants. 

Nursing Student Loan: Students enrolled at least half- 
time in the Nursing Program and who demonstrate need by 
filling the FAFSA are eligible for a Nursing Student Loan. 
The cumulative loan limit is $13,000 and repayment begins 
9 months after the student ceases to be enrolled at least half- 
time. Interest during repayment includes 5 percent interest 
and the maximum repayment period is 10 years. 

Federal Direct PLUS Loan: Parents of dependent stu- 
dents may apply for the Parent Loan for Undergraduate 
Students (PLUS); application forms are available upon 
request from the Financial Aid Office. You may also print an 
application from IllinoisState.edu/financialaid. A parent may 
borrow up to the cost of attendance less any other financial 
aid the student is receiving. In order to determine eligibility, 
parents must file the Free Application for Federal Student 
Aid (FAFSA). 

Before PLUS loan proceeds will be credited to the stu- 
dent's account, the parent completing the PLUS application 
must also complete a Master Promissory Note and undergo a 
successful credit check by the Department of Education. An 
electronic version of the promissory note is available at 
IllinoisState.edu/financialaid. 

"Alternative" Loans: Alternative or private loans are 
for students and parents who are not eligible for the federal 
programs of financial aid, or who need additional funds to 
meet educational expenses. In order to determine eligibility, 
students/parents must file the Free Application for Federal 
Student Aid (FAFSA). If you have any questions about your 
eligibility for financial aid to attend Illinois State, contact 
your financial aid counselor. 

FINANCIAL AID DISBURSEMENT 

If the amount of financial aid exceeds charges, you 
will receive a refund of the balance. Refund checks are 
mailed from the Student Accounts Office throughout the 
academic year for aid in excess of amounts owed the 
University. You should be prepared to buy books and have 
"start up" funds for the beginning of the semester. 

It is important to keep your local and permanent address 
information current with the Office of the University 
Registrar. University offices use this information to contact 
you (i.e., the Student Accounts Office will use your local 
address to send a refund check to you). If there is no local 
address on file with the Registrar, correspondence will be 
sent to your permanent home address. 



You may update your address in person at the Office of 
the University Registrar Service Center, Office of the 
University Registrar, 107 Moulton Hall, or by accessing the 
iCampus Portal at IllinoisState.edu/icampus. 

SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS 

All students who receive federal and state financial 
aid must meet federal and institutional standards for acad- 
emic progress in order to establish and retain aid eligibili- 
ty. Students receiving athletic or other university 
administered awards must also meet the satisfactory acad- 
emic progress standards that have been established by the 
awarding entity. 

Satisfactory academic progress for federal and state 
financial aid programs is based on three measures: cumula- 
tive grade-point average, completion rate based on credit 
hours completed compared to credit hours attempted, and a 
maximum time frame for degree completion. The follow- 
ing describes the university's standards for each of these 
three measures, and when they are reviewed: 

Cumulative Grade Point Average: Undergraduate 
students must maintain a minimum cumulative grade 
point average (GPA) of 2.00 based on credits earned at 
Illinois State University. The first time a student's GPA is 
below 2.00, the student is placed on Academic Probation 
and continues to be eligible to receive financial aid. If the 
student does not raise the GPA to 2.00 in the following 
semester of attendance, or the GPA falls below 2.00 in a 
subsequent semester, the student is Academically 
Dismissed and loses financial aid eligibility (see 
Academic Policies and Practices). 

Completion Rate: All students are required to complete 
a minimum of 67 percent of the credit hours attempted at 
Illinois State University. Courses with a grade of D or high- 
er, as well as "CR" or "CT", count as completed. Credit 
hours attempted includes audits, incompletes, withdrawals, 
and repeated or failed classes. A student who does not com- 
plete a minimum of 67 percent of credit hours attempted will 
be suspended from financial aid eligibility until his or her 
completion rate improves to at least 67 percent. 

Maximum Time Frame: The maximum time frame 
for the completion of a degree is limited by federal regula- 
tions to 150 percent of the published length of the degree 
program. This is equivalent to a maximum number of credit 
hours that includes transfer credits and all attempted credits 
at Illinois State University. Credit hours attempted include 
audits, incompletes, withdrawals, and repeated or failed 
classes. The maximum number of credit hours for which a 
student is eligible to receive financial aid is 180. The 
University also requires that all students have a declared 
major upon completion of 75 hours of coursework, includ- 
ing transfer credits. At 75 hours earned, students without a 
declared major are not automatically eligible to continue 
their enrollment or receive financial aid. 



Review of Progress Standards: Cumulative GPA is 
reviewed at the end of each semester — fall semester and 
spring semester — for both financial aid eligibility and for 
continued enrollment at Illinois State University. 

Completion rate is reviewed upon submission of a 
financial aid application (the FAFSA), and at the end of 
each period of enrollment, including the summer session. 
The Financial Aid Office sends a "warning letter" to any 
aid recipient who has not completed 67 percent of hours 
attempted at the end of the summer session or fall semes- 
ter. Aid eligibility is suspended at the end of the spring 
semester for any aid recipient who does not meet the 67 
percent completion standard. 

Maximum timeframe is reviewed upon submission of 
a financial aid application (the FAFSA), and at the end of 
each period of enrollment, including the summer session. 
The Financial Aid Office sends a "warning letter" to any aid 
recipient who is within 1 5 hours of reaching the maximum 
attempted hours for his or her degree program. 

Notification/Appeals: If financial aid eligibility is 
suspended as a result of failure to meet the completion 
rate or maximum timeframe standard, the Financial Aid 
Office sends a letter to the student including a 
Satisfactory Academic Progress Appeal Form. The 
Satisfactory Academic Progress Appeal Form must 
include reasons for failure to achieve good academic 
standing and any applicable documentation. Appeal 
Forms must be submitted to the Financial Aid Office 
within 30 days of the date of the letter and are reviewed 
by The Satisfactory Academic Progress Committee. For 
the Completion Rate standard, students can also restore 
aid eligibility by earning enough additional hours to meet 
the 67 percent requirement. 

If the student is not meeting the Cumulative Grade 
Point Average standard necessary for Financial Aid 
Satisfactory Academic Progress, the Office of Enrollment 
Management and Academic Services will communicate 
this information as part of a student's official notification of 
academic probation, dismissal or reinstatement. For more 
information about Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic 
Progress contact the Financial Aid Office. 

ENROLLMENT CHANGES AND FINANCIAL 
AID ELIGIBILITY 

Reduction in Hours: Reducing your credit hours has 
implications for both your aid eligibility for the current 
semester and future terms. Your aid eligibility is based on 
the number of credit hours for which you are enrolled on 
census day, usually the Friday of the second week of class- 
es. If your aid was distributed based on full-time enroll- 
ment (12 credits undergraduate; 9 credits graduate) and you 
drop to part-time on or before census day, your aid may be 
reduced. If you drop after the day withdrawal grades are 
assigned, the withdrawal grades will reduce your percent- 
age completion rate, which is part of the standards of 
Satisfactory Academic Progress for the receipt of financial 



Considering ISU? 

aid. These standards are posted on the financii 
Website: www.IllinoisState.edu/financialaid. 



25 
.iid 



Withdrawal: Federal regulations state that financial 
aid is earned by attending class. You have not earned 100% 
of your financial aid until you have attended 60 percent of 
the term. If you withdraw before this date, a portion of 
your financial aid has not been earned. The unearned por- 
tion is equal to the percentage of the term remaining on the 
date of withdrawal. Your financial aid eligibility will be 
recalculated based on your actual period of attendance - 
you may be asked to repay a portion of the aid that had 
been distributed to you. 

Failure to Earn Credit: If you fail to earn credit for 
any of your classes (receive grades of F, W, I and/or NC), 
federal regulations require the Financial Aid Office to 
assume you stopped attending your classes. In order to 
retain any of your financial aid, you must provide proof 
that you attended classes. If you did stop attending class, 
you are treated as an unofficial withdrawal. This means 
that the midpoint of the term is used as your last date of 
attendance and your aid eligibility is reduced by up to 50%. 
This will result in you owing funds back to the universi- 
ty unless you can provide documentation of attendance 
past the 60% point of the term. 

CONFIDENTIALITY AND THE RELEASE 
OF INFORMATION 

The Financial Aid Office will release information from 
your financial aid application file to parties within the 
University if their inquiry is related to your attendance at 
Illinois State. Inquiries from off-campus agencies and/or 
landlords will be answered by Financial Aid Office staff 
only if you have completed and signed a "Consent to 
Release Information" form from the Financial Aid Office. 
To protect the confidentiality of your records, the Financial 
Aid Office will require proper identification from the 
requesting party before releasing any of your information. 
Appropriate documentation of any release of information 
will be placed in your financial aid file. 

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT 

Students enrolled for six or more semester hours may 
work part-time at Illinois State University. Eligible student 
employees usually work 10 to 15 hours per week while 
classes are in session. Students working at Illinois State 
University earn a minimum of $7.50 per hour. This pay 
range is subject to change by action of the federal govern- 
ment, the state, or the institution. 

Federal Work-Study Program: This federally spon- 
sored program enables students with demonstrated financial 
need to earn a portion of their expenses while they are 
enrolled at Illinois State. To be initially awarded Federal 
Work-Study the applicant must indicate an interest in 
"work-study"on the FAFSA and demonstrate need. The 
federal government pays 70 percent of a Work-Study stu- 
dent's earnings, while the employer pays the balance. A stu- 



26 



Considering ISU? 



dent employed 10-15 hours per week can expect to earn 
between $1,500 and $2,000 a year. Work-Study students 
find work on-campus (food service, library, Bone Student 
Center, departmental offices) or in nonprofit, off-campus 
agencies (hospitals, youth centers, charitable agencies and 
libraries). Another Federal Work-Study program is the 
"America Reads" initiative in which students are employed 
as reading tutors in local elementary schools. 

Students go directly to the employer for an interview 
and, if hired, must complete state and federal withholding 
tax forms in the Payroll Office, 101 Hovey Hall. The student 
is not permitted to earn more than the Work- Study eligibility 
determined by federal regulations. 

Regular Student Employment: Those students who 
desire to work on or off campus may seek part-time employ- 
ment with the University or off campus. These jobs general- 
ly pay the minimum wage. Hours vary, and may be less 
flexible than Federal Work-Study positions. 

Finding a Job: Both Federal Work Study and regular 
student employment part-time job openings are accessible 
through student employment at IllinoisState.edu/jobs. 
The Financial Aid Office, located in Fell 238, can offer 
assistance with off-campus part-time job searches. Call 
(309) 438-2236 for an appointment with the coordinator of 
part-time employment. 



Tuition and Fees 

ESTIMATED TOTAL YEARLY EXPENSES 

Tuition, fees, and on-campus housing charges are sub- 
ject to change by action of the Board of Trustees. For the 
most up to date rates and information, please refer to our 
Website at: www.comptroller.ilstu.edu/studentaccounts. 

UNDERGRADUATE TUITION AND FEES 
FOR NEW STUDENTS 

Tuition and fees other than health insurance are 
assessed at per semester hour rates. Health insurance is 
assessed to all students enrolled in nine or more semester 
hours. Upon being first enrolled in a degree program at 
Illinois State University, tuition and general fee rates for 
undergraduate students will be locked for a four-year peri- 
od. Certain degree programs qualify for the locked rate to 
be extended beyond the four-year period. For additional 
information, refer to the Student Accounts Web page at 
IllinoisState.edu/srudentaccounts. 

Audit Costs: Students taking only audit courses (cours- 
es without credit) are charged tuition rates the same as any 
other course. 

Residents and Non-Residents: An applicant or 
enrolled student is classified either as a resident of Illinois, a 
non-resident, or a foreign student. Residency for tuition pur- 



poses is different from residency for voting, taxing purposes, 
or residency requirements of on-campus doctoral programs. 

A student must be a U.S. citizen or have been approved 
for U.S. Permanent Resident status in order to be considered 
as an Illinois resident. An individual's residency status is 
based on information from the admission application. A stu- 
dent who is not a resident of Illinois pays the non-resident 
tuition fee. All other fees are the same for non-residents. A 
student under 1 8 years of age is considered a non-resident if 
the student's parents are not legal residents of Illinois. A stu- 
dent over 1 8 years of age is considered a non-resident if the 
student is not a legal resident of Illinois. Personnel within the 
Office of the University Registrar are responsible for deter- 
mining residency. 

An individual will be considered an Illinois resident 
if all of the following conditions are met: 

1. The individual resided with his or her parent or 
guardian while attending public or private high school 
in this State. 

2. The individual graduated from a public or private high 
school or received the equivalent of a high school 
diploma in this State. 

3. The individual attended school in this State for at least 3 
years as of the date the individual graduated from high 
school or received the equivalent of a high school diploma. 

4. The individual registers as an entering student in the 
University not earlier than the 2004 fall semester. 

5. In the case of an individual who is not a citizen or a 
permanent resident of the United States, the individual 
provides the University with an affidavit stating that 
the individual will file an application to become a per- 
manent resident of the United States at the earliest 
opportunity the individual is eligible to do so. 

Tuition and fees are subject to change by action of 
the Board of Trustees and the General Assembly. 

Reduction of Tuition and Fees Policy: A registered 
student who officially withdraws from the University may 
receive a reduction of tuition and fees, including any 
advance deposit according to the following schedule: 

1 . If withdrawal is prior to the first regularly scheduled 
class day, all tuition and fees are deleted. 

2. If withdrawal is within the first 15 calendar days after 
the first regularly scheduled class day, all tuition and 
fees minus a service charge of $30 are refunded. 

3. If withdrawal is after the 15th calendar day but within 
the sixty percent point in time of the period of enroll- 
ment — a refund equal to the portion of the period of 
enrollment remaining, rounded downward to the nearest 
ten percent, less an administrative fee not to exceed the 
lesser of five percent of the initial tuition, fees, and other 
charges assessed the student or $100. 



Considering ISU' 



27 



4. If withdrawal is after the sixty percent point in time of 
the period of enrollment — no refund shall be made. 
The University may designate shorter refund periods 
for summer session, special courses, and short courses. 

All notifications of withdrawal or cancellation and 
requests for refunds must be in writing and addressed to 
Office of the University Registrar, Illinois State 
University, Campus Box 2202, Normal, IL 61790-2202, 
or faxed to: (309) 438-3193. 

A student who changes from full- to part-time status or 
a part-time student who reduces the number of credit hours 
carried may receive a reduction of tuition and fees accord- 
ing to the following schedule: 

1. If the reduction is on or before the 15th calendar day 
after the first regularly scheduled class day, all tuition 
and fees not applicable to the new part-time status are 
reduced. A service charge is not applicable to a student 
who changes from full-time to part-time status. 

2. If the reduction is after the 15th but no later than the 
30th calendar day after the first regularly scheduled 
class day, 25 percent of the difference in tuition charge 
only is reduced. 

A student may receive a refund of insurance fees if the 
student demonstrates equal or better insurance coverage 
and completes the written application on or before the 15th 
calendar day after the first regularly scheduled class day. 

A student whose course of study requires absence from 
campus for the entire term shall, upon proper application, 
receive refunds of Activity, Health Service, and Athletic 
fees. The application for the refund must be made to the 
Office of University Registrar on or before the 15th calendar 
day after the first regularly scheduled class day. 

Part or all of a student's tuition and fees may be 
refunded because of the student's death or disability, 
extreme hardship, or institutional error. 



A student may receive a refund of tuition and fees if a 
scholarship is awarded that covers those fees. The applica- 
tion for refund must be made no later than 60 days after the 
close of the session. 

A student may receive a refund of tuition and fees if the 
University declares him or her ineligible for enrolled status 
prior to the first day of regularly scheduled class. 

The statement of the refund policy for University 
housing is a part of the housing contract. Information on 
the refund policy may be obtained from the Student 
Accounts Office. 

Students or parents who believe that individual circum- 
stances warrant exceptions from published policy may 
appeal to the Associate Vice President for Student Affairs by 
calling (309) 438-5451. 

Housing Costs: For information, contact University 
Housing Services or visit www.housing.ilstu.edu 

TRANSCRIPTS 

Transcripts are issued only after all student financial 
obligations have been met. Students should make a written, 
signed request to Office of the University Registrar, Campus 
Box 2202, Normal, IL 61790-2202. A $6.00 charge (fee sub- 
ject to change) is made for each official transcript. Requests 
should include identification number, birthdate, and com- 
plete address, including zip code, to which the transcript is to 
be sent. When possible, transcript requests are processed 
within five working days. 

MATERIALS CHARGES 

A materials charge is an optional fee charged to a stu- 
dent for consumable materials used in a course. A student 
may supply his or her own material and submit a written 
request to the instructor to waive the charge. Courses with 
material charges are listed in the Undergraduate Catalog 
and Graduate Catalog. 



28 



MAKING THE TRANSITION 



New Student Orientation 

Passages — Fall Orientation: Passages is a university- 
wide orientation program offered to all students new to 
Illinois State University. The program introduces students to 
campus technology, Milner Library and other campus 
resources. It also provides many opportunities for education- 
al, informational and social interaction in order to help new 
students in their transition to Illinois State. During the pro- 
gram, the students are introduced to the academic standards 
and expectations of excellence at Illinois State University. 
Students receive program information during the summer. 
Further information is available from the Dean of Students 
Office- Programming, Bone Student Center first floor, (309) 
438-2836, and www.Passages.ilsru.edu. 

Special arrangements: Arrangements can be made to 
assist participation in these programs by students with dis- 
abilities through Disability Concerns, 350 Fell Hall. Contact 
them by voice at (309) 438-5853 or TTY (309) 438-8620 
regarding any special needs at least one week prior to arriv- 
ing on campus for these program events. 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 

324 Fell Hall, Campus Box 4060 
(309) 438-3217 
IllinoisState.edu/ucollege 

The mission of University College is to provide effec- 
tive programs and services that assist students in making 
successful transitions into Illinois State University, achieving 
their educational goals, and realizing their academic poten- 
tial in the first year and beyond. Programs and services 
offered or coordinated through University College include 
University College Academic Advisement, Developmental 
Mathematics, First Year Learning in Communities, Preview, 
Student Support Services/TRiO, Transfer Days, the Julia N. 
Visor Academic Center, University Studies Major, and 
University College Testing Services. 



ments, assistance for declaring or changing a major, and 
help finding the resources they need to overcome academic 
difficulties. Students with 24 or fewer semester hours, and 
all Undeclared and Unclassified students, are served by 
University College Academic Advisement. 

ORIENTATION AND TRANSITION SERVICES 

Preview — Summer Orientation: During the two-day 
Preview program in the summer, new freshmen receive aca- 
demic orientation, meet with academic advisors, and register 
for fall semester classes. There also are opportunities for 
new freshmen and their family members to discuss issues of 
campus life with faculty, staff, and current students. 
Freshmen admitted for fall semester receive registration 
materials for Preview in late spring. Further information is 
available in University College at Orientation and Transition 
Services, 329 Fell Hall, Campus Box 4060, (309) 438-8486 
and IllinoisState.edu/preview. 

Transfer Day Program: Newly admitted transfer students 
participate in a one-day Transfer Day Program to receive 
academic advisement, register for classes, and learn more 
about the University. Multiple Transfer Days are held each 
term — generally three days are scheduled in the fall for 
those admitted for the spring term and five days are sched- 
uled in the spring for those admitted for the summer and/or 
fall terms. Students receive information about participating 
in the Transfer Day Program after they have been admitted. 
Students admitted after the Transfer Day Program are sent 
information regarding additional advisement and registra- 
tion opportunities. Further information is available in 
University College Orientation and Transition Services, 
331 Fell Hall, Campus Box 4060, (309) 438-3859 and 
www.ucollege.ilsru.edu/transfer_days. 

For information on course transfer options, see the 
University-Wide Programs section of this catalog titled, 
"Transferring General Education Courses - Illinois 
Articulation Initiative." Information on transferability of 
courses can also be found at www.iTransfer.org. 



UNIVERSITY COLLEGE ACADEMIC 
ADVISEMENT 

340 Fell Hall, Campus Box 4060 
(309) 438-7604 
www.ucollege.ilstu.edu/advising 

Caring professionals and trained academic peer advi- 
sors in University College Academic Advisement help 
incoming students with educational planning, course selec- 
tion and referral services. Professional and peer advisors 
help students explore academic majors and career options, 
and assist them in developing plans to meet their goals. 
Students can obtain information about academic require - 



FIRST YEAR LEARNING IN COMMUNITIES 
(LinC) 

324 Fell Hall, Campus Box 4060 
(309) 438-3217 
www.ucollege.ilstu.edu/teaching/linc 

LinC assists first year students in their initial transition 
to and retention within Illinois State University. This semi- 
nar, offered only during the first eight weeks of the fall 
semester, provides a small community structure that: pro- 
motes connections with peers, faculty, and staff; provides 
experiences to learn about resources of the University; and 
offers opportunities to become involved in university life. 



Making the Transition 



29 



VETERANS SERVICES 

112 Moulton Hall, (309) 438-2207 

Web address: www.registrar.ilstu.edu/veterans 

This office assists student-veterans and certain depen- 
dents on matters relating to Department of Veterans Affairs 
educational benefits and payments, which include 
Montgomery GI Bill, Post 9/11 GI Bill, and Survivors' and 
Dependents' Educational Assistance Program. For more 
information, the student should contact the Office of 
Veterans Services. Public service hours are from 9 a.m. to 12 
noon and from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. 

Housing and Dining Options 

CAMPUS LIVING 
University Housing Services 

Office of Residential Life Building 

www.Housing.ilstu.edu 

(309) 438-8611; TTY (309) 438-8177 

Students with disabilities are requested to contact the 
Director of Disability Concerns, 350 Fell Hall at (309) 438- 
5853— Voice, (309) 438-8620— TTY. 

RESIDENCE HALLS 

The University owns and operates 10 residence halls, pro- 
viding living accommodations for approximately 6,500 stu- 
dents. These facilities include spaces accessible to students 
with disabilities. The residence halls have been designed to 
provide not only basic living requirements, but also counsel- 
ing, advisement, educational, and cocurricular programs. The 
University regards residence hall living as an important part of 
university life and requires that certain students reside in the 
residence halls as a condition of enrollment. 

Professional staff, aided by undergraduate Resident 
Assistants, is responsible for educational programs, poli- 
cies, and facilities within the residence halls. 

In the spring, residence hall information about the 
contract application process and the room selection 
process will be mailed to the students who have been 
admitted to the University for the following academic 
year. If all regular residence hall rooms become filled, new 
applicants may be offered accommodations in supplemental 
housing. (Supplemental housing rooms are like regular rooms 
in their furnishings but are used as study lounges when not 
being used for supplemental housing and may house up to six 
students.) Room and meal plan rates for supplemental hous- 
ing are the same as for regular housing. Acceptance of a sup- 
plemental housing offer is optional, however all terms and 
conditions become enforceable upon receipt of the supple- 
mental housing contract addendum by the University. 

The room rate in the residence halls for the 2009-2010 
academic year ranged from $4,190 to $7,164 for multiple 



occupancy room. A limited number of single, super single, 
and suite rooms are available at an additional cost. 
Manchester Hall will remain open during all university 
breaks during the academic year. All students assigned to 
Manchester Hall are required to pay an additional mandato- 
ry, nonrefundable charge above and beyond the basic room 
rate. A deposit is required at the time a student completes 
his/her online application contract. The deposit covers a 
security deposit, which is retained until the final period of 
occupancy, a nonrefundable application fee, and a payment 
which is applied toward room charges. In 2009-2010, the 
deposit was $300. Students may elect to pay each semes- 
ter's room and meal plan charges in one lump sum or in 
installments. There is a $30 refund for paying in one lump 
sum. Students are expected to furnish linens, towels, blan- 
kets, pillows, bedspreads, and waste baskets. Rates for the 
2010-2011 and 2011-2012 academic years were not 
available at the time this catalog was printed. Visit 
www.Housing.ilstu.edu for additional information. 

University On-Campus Housing Policy: Entering fresh- 
men who have not previously attended this University must 
reside in university-operated residence halls for their first four 
semesters. Students transferring to this University as sopho- 
mores (as classified by the Office of Admissions) must reside 
in university-operated residence halls for their first two semes- 
ters. These policies are applicable to all students insofar as 
space is available in university residence halls. Residence hall 
living for two summer sessions is equivalent to one semester. 
Visit www.Housing.ilstu.edu for more complete information 
about the On-Campus Housing Policy. 

The University may make exceptions for certain cate- 
gories of students based upon guidelines related to marital 
status, proximity of home to campus, age, and other perti- 
nent factors. The deadline for requesting an exemption to 
the requirement is July 1 5 immediately prior to the academic 
year. Consideration also will be given to applications for 
exemption received prior to July 15 from sophomore stu- 
dents who are members of fraternities or sororities who 
will be residing in their organization's official house. 
Those fraternities and sororities must be members of 
Interfraternity Council Panhellenic Association and 
National Panhellenic Council, Inc. and approved by the 
Dean of Students Office. Students who wish to appeal a 
decision concerning their petition for an exemption to the 
University On-Campus Housing Agreement, they may 
obtain information on the appeals procedure from 
University Housing Services, (309) 438-8611 or at 
www.Housing.ilstu.edu. 

APARTMENT LIVING 

Two university-owned apartment complexes provide 
residents with an environment conducive to both personal 
and academic growth. Qualifying upper-class students, stu- 
dents who are married or in domestic partnerships, students 
with dependents, and graduate students are eligible to 
reside in these units. 



30 



Making the Transition 



There are 292 unfurnished apartments in the two com- 
plexes, Cardinal Court and 300 Shelbourne Drive, offering 
residents a quiet environment, community atmosphere, 
excellent maintenance service, and spacious grounds. Rental 
rates for 2009-2010 ranged from $400 to $547 per month, 
including water service. All other utilities are paid by the 
resident. A security deposit is required and is held until after 
occupancy is terminated. In 2009-2010 the security deposit 
was $250. For additional information and an application 
contact University Housing Services at (309) 438-8611 or 
visit www.Housing.ilsru.edu. 

Off-Campus Housing: The University does not par- 
ticipate in housing contracts issued to students renting 
space in private housing and does not participate in the 
inspection of any off-campus housing. However, Off- 
Campus Services, a unit of the Dean of Students Office, 
provides Illinois State students with support and services 
to help enhance their off-campus living experience. You 
can learn more at www.DeanofStudents.ilstu.edu or by 
calling (309) 438-5951 (voice) or (309) 438-2762 (TTY) 

CAMPUS DINING SERVICES 

John Green Building 
www.Dining.ilstu.edu 
(309) 438-8351 

Campus Dining Services is the exclusive food 
provider on campus. In addition to three residential dining 
centers, Campus Dining operates retail dining locations in 
Bone Student Center, cafes in the College of Business 
Building and Centennial, and a catering department. 

All students living in the residence halls are required 
to purchase a meal plan each semester. Every meal plan 
includes Flex Dollars intended for use in the three residen- 
tial dining centers; Watterson Commons adjacent to 
Watterson Towers, Marketplace at Linkins Center in Tri- 
Towers adjoining Haynie, Wilkins and Wright halls, and 
The Southside in Feeney adjoining Hamilton- Whitten and 
Atkin-Colby residence halls. Dining centers are open con- 
tinuously throughout the day to allow for convenience and 
flexibility. Students may use Flex Dollars to purchase food 
in the Subway shops located on campus, in any of the retail 
shops at Bone Student Center, cafes in academic buildings, 
or items from the residence hall vending machines. The 
university ID (Redbird Card) is used to access the meal 
plan. Visit www.Dining.ilstu.edu for detailed information 
on meal plans, hours, and menus. 

Students who have been admitted to the University 
will complete the online dining meal plan contract in the 
spring; meal plan information will be mailed early in the 
spring term, along with the housing packet. Meal plans for 
the 2009-2010 academic year ranged from $3,662 to 
$4,184. Students will pay their meal plan charges in the 
same way they selected to pay their housing charges (one 
lump sum or installments). Rates for the 2010-201 1 and the 
2011-2012 academic years were not available at the time 
this catalog was printed. 



Any student with a special dietary need, including a 
food allergy, is encouraged to contact Campus Dining 
Services' registered dietitian to make arrangements for 
this accommodation. Requests may be directed to 
CampusDining@IllinoisState.edu. 

Campus Services 

CHILD CARE 

124 Turner Hall, (309) 438-5026 

Open to Illinois State University students and 
faculty/staff when space allows, Illinois State Child Care 
Center offers high quality, affordable child care services to 
children 3-9 years of age. It is open during the fall, spring, 
and summer semesters. Hours are 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 
during the fall and spring; 7:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. during the 
summer. The center is licensed for 30 children at a time 
with care provided in 124 Turner Hall. Call (309) 438-5026 
or email kstephen@ilstu.edu for an application or visit the 
Child Care Website at ChildCareCenter.IllinoisState.edu. 

OFFICE OF PARKING AND TRANSPORTATION 

709 N. Main Street 
(309) 438-8391 or (309) 438-PARK 
Website: www.parking.ilstu.edu 
Email: parking@ilstu.edu 

During the posted hours, all vehicles occupying 
University parking facilities, other than metered spaces 
(enforced 24 hours a day, seven days a week), must display a 
valid and appropriate parking permit obtained from the 
Office of Parking and Transportation. Office hours are 7:30 
a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. A valid Illinois 
State University I.D. is required to purchase a permit. 

Additional information is available on the Parking and 
Transportation Website at: www.parking.ilstu.edu 

DISABILITY CONCERNS 

350 Fell Hall, (309) 438-5853— Voice 
(309) 438-8620— TTY 
www.DisabilityConcerns.ilstu.edu 

Disability Concerns, a unit of the Division of Student 
Affairs, is the office that is designated to provide reason- 
able accommodation services for students and visitors 
with disabilities. 

The mission of Disability Concerns is to ensure full 
and equal participation for persons with disabilities in the 
Illinois State University community through: 

empowering individuals, 
promoting equal access, 
encouraging self-advocacy, 
reducing attitudinal, physical and 
communications barriers, and 
providing appropriate accommodations. 



Disability Concerns provides accommodation services 
that support people with disabilities in: 

the realization of academic goals, 
• reaching professional goals, and 

becoming contributing members of society and 
lifelong learners. 

To receive services from Disability Concerns, appropri- 
ate medical/psychoeducational documentation must be pro- 
vided. Upon acceptance of the documentation by the 
Documentation Review Committee, the case coordinator 
works with the student on a case-by-case basis to determine 
the impact of the disability and the appropriate accommoda- 
tion^). Disability Concerns offers a variety of services to 
accommodate persons with disabilities. Accommodations 
provided may include, but are not limited to, exam accom- 
modations, sign language interpreters, notetakers, assistive 
technologies and materials in alternative formats. 

Disability Concerns provides many of its services 
through a volunteer model. This is promoted to diminish 
attitudinal barriers and to promote understanding and 
respect for persons with disabilities. All students, faculty, 
staff, and alumni of the University are encouraged to vol- 
unteer their time and talents. This volunteer program 
offers the opportunity to obtain volunteer hours, develop 
experience to enhance a resume, and perhaps most impor- 
tantly, develop skills that encourage and promote diversi- 
ty. Persons interested in providing volunteer assistance 
should inquire at Disability Concerns. 

HEALTH PROMOTION AND WELLNESS 

Phone: (309) 438-5948; TTY: (309) 438-2498 
Website: www.wellness.ilstu.edu 

Health Promotion and Wellness serves Illinois State 
University students, faculty, and staff and is located on the 
third floor of the Student Services Building. The depart- 
ment will move to the new Student Fitness Kinesiology 
Recreation Building upon opening in 201 1 . 

Health Promotion and Wellness uses a comprehensive 
approach to help you achieve a healthy balance and more 
enjoyment in all aspects of your life. Staff is available to 
assist you with a variety of wellness issues, including: 
physical fitness, diet/nutrition, quitting smoking, stress 
management, body image, spiritual health, emotional & 
social wellness, sexual health, and other issues affecting 
your well being. Health Promotion and Wellness offers a 
comprehensive wellness education and prevention area that 
offers written materials, fact sheets, brochures, texts, inter- 
active CD-ROMs, professional journals, and other media 
resources for students, faculty and staff, to use in class- 
room projects, research, or for personal health care. In 
addition, the Peer Education program trains student volun- 
teers to conduct interactive and educational workshops, 
assist with campus and community outreach projects, and 
help serve as an information and referral resource. 



Making the Transition 31 

STUDENT HEALTH PROGRAM 

Student Health Services: (309) 438-8655 
Website: www.shs.ilstu.edu 
Student Insurance: (309)438-2515 

The Student Health Services and Student Insurance 
Office are located on the second floor of the Student 
Services Building on the corner of College Avenue and 
University Street, just west of the Bone Student Center. 

The Student Health program consists of two compo- 
nents (1) the on-campus Student Health Service and (2) a 
comprehensive low-cost Student Health and Accident 
Insurance Plan that supplements services available through 
the Student Health Services. 

Eligibility and Fees: Regarding the Student Health 
Services, all students who register for one or more credit 
hours and are assessed general fees are entitled to use all the 
services at the on-campus clinic for the entire semester or ses- 
sion. There will be a $5 Front Door Fee assessed to the user's 
University account for each visit to the Student Health 
Services. Spring semester students, who do not plan to attend 
summer session classes, may obtain summer health care if 
they pay the appropriate health fee. Enrolled students may 
purchase Student Health Services access for spouses/domes- 
tic partners if they pay the fee. An eligible student who grad- 
uates may purchase one additional term prior to the 
expiration of the current term. All optional health fees are 
payable at the Student Health Services Business Office. 

Regarding Student Health Insurance, all students who 
register for nine or more credit hours during the fall and 
spring semesters by the fifteenth calendar day of classes (or 
for six or more hours by the eighth day of the first summer 
session) and are assessed general fees, are also assessed a 
health insurance premium. 

On-Campus Student Health Services: The clinic is fully 
accredited by the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory 
Health Care, Inc. Services at the clinic are comparable to 
those offered by most private community physicians. The 
clinic is staffed by licensed physicians, nurse practitioners, 
physician assistants and nurses. Services available include a 
medical clinic, women's health clinic, psychiatry, diagnostic 
laboratory, radiology, pharmacy, allergy injections, immu- 
nizations, etc. Students wanting to use the clinic may sched- 
ule an appointment via the Website at www.shs.ilstu.edu or 
call the appointment line at (309) 438-2778 to schedule an 
appointment. Students need to bring their Illinois State 
Student I.D. card at check-in. 

Complicated illnesses or injuries requiring surgery or 
long-term care usually will be referred to an outside special- 
ist. New students who have chronic medical conditions such 
as asthma, diabetes, or epilepsy, which require continuous 
monitoring and treatment, should retain the services of pri- 
vate physicians for the continuing supervision and manage- 
ment of their condition. The Student Health Services staff 
will furnish supportive care and assist the student's private 
physician in the student's care if the private physician fur- 



32 



Making the Transition 



nishes written instructions. There are medical specialists plus 
two hospitals in the Bloomington-Normal area that are 
equipped to handle medical problems should they arise. 
Information regarding medical services can be obtained by 
contacting the Student Health Services main reception area in 
the Student Services Building, or by calling (309) 438-8655. 

Student Health and Accident Insurance: The 

Student Health Insurance Fee provides a health and acci- 
dent insurance policy intended to meet the needs of stu- 
dents without other insurance or to provide 100 percent 
coverage for insured expenses by coordinating with a 
family policy. The policy includes world-wide coverage, 
with a $1,000,000 maximum, a $1,000 stop-loss provision 
designed to provide catastrophic coverage while limiting 
out-of-pocket expenses, and a $50 deductible. This 
deductible is waived if other insurance is also in force. 
The schedule of benefits includes services for hospital 
inpatient and outpatient use, including emergencies, sur- 
gical and anesthesia fees, physicians' charges, consulta- 
tion expenses, laboratory and radiology expenses, and 
ambulance services. A complete schedule of benefits may 
be obtained from the Office of Student Insurance, Room 
230, in the Student Services Building. 

Student insurance coverage (and eligibility to use 
clinic services) begins the Monday prior to the first day of 
regularly scheduled fall classes; the Thursday before 
spring classes; and on the first day of the first summer 
session classes. This coverage is terminated on the first 
day of classes of the next regularly scheduled term. 
Continuous year-round coverage is available if the stu- 
dent maintains university registration at nine or more 
hours during the fall and spring semesters and applies for 
summer coverage prior to the expiration of spring cover- 
age. A summer insurance fee is assessed automatically 
when registration of 6 or more credit hours is completed 
by the 8 th calendar day. An insured student who graduates 
may purchase one additional term at the group rate by the 
last day of the covered period. This policy contains no 
extension of benefits into a non-covered semester for any 
condition. Extension of coverage for existing conditions, 
such as maternity, is available through the continuation 
option, details of which can be obtained from the Student 
Insurance Office. Although dependent coverage is not 
included in the Student Plan, the Student Insurance Office 
can provide suggested alternatives for students needing 
dependent coverage. 

It is strongly recommended that students remain 
enrolled in this plan even if other health insurance is pre- 
sent. A request to cancel this insurance plan is permitted 
during the first 1 5 calendar days of each semester (eight 
days during the summer session) for those students who 
prove they have comparable insurance coverage (insurance 
ID card or copy of policy) and complete the required peti- 
tion in the Student Insurance Office. However, experience 
often has shown that the premium for the Illinois State 
University plan is less than out-of-pocket bills that many 
have to pay because of higher deductibles and coinsurance 



provisions in their own policy. Additionally, students 
sometimes lose coverage through their parents' plan 
because of age limitations, changes in dependent status, or 
changes in employment of parents. Thus, it can be more 
economical to remain enrolled in the Illinois State plan. 

The previous information is a summary of benefits 
and enrollment procedures. Persons desiring specific 
information about the Illinois State University Student 
Health Insurance Plan should contact the Student Health 
Insurance Office, Room 230, Student Services Building, 
or call (309) 438-2515. 

STUDENT COUNSELING SERVICES 

320 Student Services Building, voice: (309) 438-3655 

TTY: (309) 438-5489 

www.counseling.ilstu.edu 

Student Counseling Services (SCS) provides a full range 
of counseling services on a voluntary, strictly confidential 
basis. Group counseling is offered to promote self-discovery 
and to provide students with opportunities to change patterns 
of behavior in relationships. SCS also offers individual per- 
sonal and career counseling, crisis intervention, after hours on- 
call services for emergencies, and psychiatric consultation. 
Counseling services are offered free of charge to students. 

Students seek our services for many reasons. Our staff 
of licensed professionals can offer assistance with issues 
such as relationships, identity, unwanted habits, depression, 
stress management, anxiety, grief and loss issues, self- 
esteem, and decision-making, to name but a few common 
concerns students bring to the center. 

Students can call the office or walk-in to make an 
appointment. During the initial appointment a counselor 
will meet with the student to clarify their concerns and to 
determine a plan to address those concerns that may 
include on-going counseling, referral to one of our pro- 
grams, or another service in the community. 

Student Counseling Services also offers a wide range 
of workshops on mental health issues, a Career Choice 
class (IDS 106), and has an extensive self-help section 
with online self-assessments for depression, anxiety, eat- 
ing disorders, etc. on our webpage. All services are offered 
in a way that supports cultural and racial diversity and pro- 
motes respect for individual differences. 

SPEECH AND HEARING CLINIC 

211 Rachel Cooper/Fairchild Hall, (309) 438-8641 
Website: SpeechHearingClinic.lllinoisState.edu 

Students and faculty may obtain fee-based evaluation 
and therapy services for a wide range of speech, language, 
and hearing disorders. Hearing aids and assistive listening 
technologies are dispensed at competitive prices. Please con- 
tact the Speech and Hearing Clinic in the Department of 
Communication Sciences and Disorders for an appointment. 



33 



STUDENT INVOLVEMENT AND COMMUNITY 



Dean of Students 

Janet W. Paterson, Ph.D., Dean of Students 
Bone Student Center, Room 144 
Campus Box 2640; (309) 438-2008 
Email: DeanofStudents@IUinoisState.edu 
Website: www.DeanOfStudents.ilstu.edu 

The purpose of the Dean of Students Office at Illinois 
State University is to provide advocacy, problem resolution 
and crisis intervention as well as a variety of programs and 
services for students. 

The major function areas within the Dean of Students 
Office include the following areas: 

Campus Discipline 
Commencement Management 
Diversity Advocacy Programs 
Fall Orientation 
Greek Affairs 

Leadership Development Programs 
Legal Services 
Mediation Services 
Nontraditional Student Services 
Off-Campus Student Services 
Parent Services 

Recruitment and Retention Programs for Under- 
Represented Student Populations 
Student Government Advisement 
Student Involvement Opportunities/Registered Student 
Organizations 
Student Programming 
Volunteer Services 

COMMUNITY RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES 

Coordinator: Anne Newman 

Student Services Building, Room 120 

Campus Box 2440; (309) 438-8621 

Email: crr@ilstu.edu 

Website: www.DeanOfStudents.ilstu.edu 

Community Rights and Responsibilities, a unit of the 
Dean of Students Office, coordinates the University's stu- 
dent disciplinary, grievance, and conflict resolution process- 
es. Student disciplinary matters are reviewed both by 
administrative staff and by the University Hearing Panel, 
while student grievances against faculty and staff are 
reviewed by the Student Grievance Committee. Appeals of 
both processes are reviewed by the Student Code 
Enforcement and Review Board. 

For students engaged in conflicts with other members 
of the community, alternative dispute resolution services 
are also provided. Mediation is available in many cases 
where the parties agree to attempt to develop a solution to 



satisfy both/all parties. Both student and administrative 
forms of dispute resolution, such as facilitation and negoti- 
ation are available as deemed appropriate. 

DIVERSITY ADVOCACY 

Coordinator: Angela Davenport 
Student Services Building, Room 387 
Campus Box 5800; (309) 438-8968 
Website: www.DeanOtStudents.ilstu.edu 

Diversity Advocacy, a unit of the Dean of Students 
Office, plans programs to promote diversity and raise cultur- 
al awareness in students, faculty and staff and provides sup- 
port for underrepresented populations through advocacy, 
outreach and education. 

The unit coordinates a wide variety of educational 
experiences designed to celebrate and reflect the diversity 
that makes up the Illinois State community, including (but 
not limited to): African- Americans, Asian- Americans, Gay 
Lesbian Bisexual and Transgender persons, Latinos/Latinas, 
Native Americans, women and persons with disabilities, and 
Multi-Ethnic individuals. Through MECCPAC (Multi 
Ethnic Cultural and Co-Curricular Programming Advisory 
Committee), Diversity Advocacy provides funds to co-spon- 
sor diversity and cultural development by other departments 
and student organizations. The unit also plays a role in 
developing student recruitment and retention initiatives and 
collaborates with faculty and academic departments to 
enhance in-and-out-of-classroom experiences. 

PARENT SERVICES 

Coordinator: John Davenport 
Bone Student Center, Room 144 
Campus Box 3090, (309) 438-3753 
Website: www.DeanOfStudents.ilstu.edu 

Parent Services, a unit of the Dean of Students Office, 
provides support and assistance to parents and family mem- 
bers of Illinois State students. The unit provides information, 
resources and materials about the University, and also devel- 
ops programs that promote family involvement, such as 
Family Weekend. The unit also serves to convey the sugges- 
tions and concerns of parents to the University community. 

STUDENT INVOLVEMENT CENTER 

Coordinator: Steve Klay 
Bone Student Center, Prairie Room South 
Campus Box 2700; (309) 438-3212 
Email: studentorganizations@ilstu.edu 
Website: www.DeanOfStudents.ilstu.edu 

The Student Involvement Center, a unit of the Dean of 
Students Office, helps students who are looking to get 
involved on campus, and those who are currently involved 



34 



Student Involvement and Community 



with registered student organizations (RSOs). Illinois State has 
an organization or club for almost every interest. The center 
maintains a registry of over 300 student organizations on cam- 
pus, which are categorized by areas of interest. To view a cur- 
rent listing of all the organizations or for information about 
how to start a new organization, visit the Dean of Students 
Website or contact the Student Involvement Center. 



Campus Community and 
Recreation 

BONE STUDENT CENTER/ 
BRADEN AUDITORIUM 

100 N. University Street 
Campus Box 2640 
(309) 438-2222 
www.BoneStudentCenter.ilstu.edu 

The Bone Student Center (BSC) and Braden 
Auditorium, named for the institution's ninth and tenth pres- 
idents respectively, serves as a hub of student activities and 
services. Committed to serving the needs of the University 
community, the BSC includes a number of study and hang 
out spaces, along with eateries such as McAlister's Deli, 
Burger King, Pizza Hut Express, Freshens, and Einstein 
Bros® Bagels. The ISU Credit Union, TechZone, PIP 
Printing, the Lobby Shop convenience store, the InfoCenrre 
information desk and the Illinois State Bookstore in partner- 
ship with Barnes and Noble, are additional services available 
in the Center. The Bone Student Center also serves as home 
to Leadership and Service, the University Program Board, 
the Student Involvement Center, Dean of Students Office, 
and the Redbird Card Office. 

Braden Auditorium, an academic and public service 
facility, seats 3,457 and offers premier entertainment for 
the University and local community. The Braden Box 
Office, an official TicketMaster outlet located in the Bone 
Student Center, sells tickets to Braden performances, 
Peoria Charter and Burlington Trailways bus tickets, and 
provides personal check cashing. 

Adjacent to the BSC is the Bowling and Billiards Center 
(BBC). With 10 lanes of bowling and 20 billiards tables, the 
BBC plays host to the Illinois State Bowling Team. 

CAMPUS RECREATION 

Website: www.rec.ilstu.edu 

Student Recreation Building, 
Beech and Willow, (309) 438-PLAY 
Outdoor Adventure Rental Center, 220 N. Main, 
(309) 438-8419 

Campus Recreation encourages personal enrichment 
by providing a variety of leisure experiences and recreational 
opportunities. Consult the department's website at 



www.rec.ilstu.edu for a comprehensive guide to the many 
services, programs, facilities, and events provided by the 
department each semester. 

The department operates two facilities: The Student 
Recreation Building and the Outdoor Adventure Rental Center. 
The Student Recreation Building features open recreation 
areas for racquetball, walleyball, basketball, walking/jog- 
ging, and sand volleyball, all of which are open to Illinois 
State University students with a valid university ID. 
Purchase of a Weights Plus membership includes access 
to cardiovascular, circuit training, and free weight equip- 
ment. A Group Fitness membership includes unlimited 
access to many fitness and cycling classes. The best of 
both memberships can be enjoyed with the purchase of a 
combo pass. 

The Outdoor Adventure Rental Center offers a wide 
assortment of outdoor equipment available to rent with dis- 
counted rates to Illinois State University students. The 
Outdoor Adventure Library is also located in this facility 
with information to help plan any outdoor excursion. 

With an anticipated opening in Spring 2011, the new 
Student Fitness, Kinesiology and Recreation Building will 
help to generate numerous additional campus recreation 
opportunities for students. Located in the heart of campus on 
southwest corner of the Quad, this 1 70,000 square foot facil- 
ity will include basketball courts, an indoor track, increased 
aerobic and weight training space, a swimming pool, a 
climbing wall, and much more. In the new facility, students 
will no longer need to purchase a membership but will be 
able to access the building with their valid university ID. 

Don't miss all the other programming opportunities 
available through Campus Recreation, including a variety of 
intramural activities, outdoor trips, non-credit classes, spe- 
cial events and sport clubs. The department also offers stu- 
dent employment positions in a variety of programs. 

INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS AND 
WEIBRING GOLF CLUB AT ILLINOIS 
STATE UNIVERSITY 

213 Redbird Arena, (309) 438-3639 

Weibring Golf Club at Illinois State University, Gregory 

Street, (309) 438-8065 

The University competes in eight men's and eleven 
women's sports. Whether the action is scheduled for Horton 
Field House, Hancock Stadium, Redbird Arena, or any of the 
other outdoor facilities, students enjoy joining their peers in 
cheering the Redbirds on to victory. Coming out to a Redbird 
event is a great way to show school spirit and meet new 
friends. Students may purchase a Red Alert Pass for only $50 
and receive first priority for available student tickets and/or 
admission to regular season events.. Students purchasing the 
Red Alert Pass also receive benefits such as a FREE t-shirt, 
preferred seating and early admission to games. Purchasing 
a Red Alert Pass is as easy as adding it to your student 



Student Involvement and Community 



35 



account, and it allows you to experience the excitement of 
Redbird Athletics up close and personal. For additional 
information call (309) 438-3639, or visit the Website at 
www.GoRedbirds.com. 

The Weibring Golf Course at Illinois State 
University is a par 71, 18-hole course. The renovated 
golf course features a new irrigation system, rebuilt 
greens with bent grass fairways and 14 new forward and 
championship tees along with a fully stocked pro shop, 
snack bar, and cart and club rentals. Student daily, semes- 
ter, and season passes are available. 

Career Planning 

CAREER CENTER 

185 Student Services Building, (309) 438-2200 
www.CareerCenter.ilstu.edu and CareerCenter@ilstu.edu 

The Career Center is a valuable central resource for our 
students, alumni, faculty, and employers who are seeking 
qualified candidates. Students may receive guidance in many 
areas from deciding on a major to exploring career options 
that match their talents, interests, and career goals. The 
Career Center Staff also assists students in developing job 
search skills that will give them a competitive edge when 
applying for internships and full-time positions. 

Students may take advantage of individualized career 
planning assistance by making an appointment with their 
career advisor or by utilizing other career services such as 
the online job search tool (eRecruiting), an extensive 
Website containing quality job search information and mate- 
rials; on-campus interview opportunities with employers; 
and a variety of events offered throughout the academic year 
to facilitate students and alumni meeting with employers 
from business, industry, government, education and the not- 
for-profit sector. Staff is also available to assist students and 



alumni at any stage of the their career search process including 
assessment of interests and abilities; choosing a major; clarify- 
ing career goals; and providing information about the labor 
market, job outlook and salaries. 

A key component leading to a student's success when 
applying for the first career position after graduation is hav- 
ing participated in one or more internships while an under- 
graduate. Internships give students the advantage of having 
career-related experience immediately upon graduation from 
college. Internships are professionally monitored work or 
service experience for students that provide intentional 
learning goals and reflect actively on the learning experi- 
ence. They can be part- or full-time and paid or unpaid. 
Tuition and fees are assessed in the usual manner for all 
credit earned in internship experiences. Students are encour- 
aged to work with the Internship Coordinator in their college 
along with the Career Center's Assistant Director of 
Professional Practice or their career advisor to find intern- 
ships that will provide the professional experiences needed 
to be competitive in the job market. 

Illinois State University's nationally recognized 
Professional Practice Program offers academically qualified 
students an opportunity to integrate classroom study with 
one or more terms of paid or unpaid internship experience in 
a work environment related to the student's academic and 
career goals. Many organizations in the U.S. and abroad 
have served as learning sites. Students interested in enrolling 
in internships (typically 198, 298, 398 courses in the catalog) 
should contact the internship coordinator in their depart- 
ment/school or the Career Center early in their undergradu- 
ate program to ensure proper arrangement. 

For information, contact the Career Center by phone, 
Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at (309) 438-2200; 
via email at CareerCenter@ilstu.edu; or visit the Website at 
www.CareerCenter.ilstu.edu. 



36 



ACADEMIC SERVICES AND OPPORTUNITIES 



Academic Support Programs 

STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES/TRiO 

387 Fell Hall, Campus Box 4060 

(309) 438-2099 

email: studentsupportservices@ilstu.edu 

www.ucollege.ilstu.edu/mentoring/sss_trio 

Student Support Services (SSS) is a federal TRiO 
program designed to enhance the academic success, reten- 
tion, transfer, and graduation rates of eligible undergradu- 
ate students. Since 1980, the SSS program has provided 
opportunities for first-generation and/or low income 
Illinois State University students. From enrollment to 
graduation, SSS program personnel are dedicated to offer- 
ing individualized assistance and support services that 
will enhance the academic, personal and professional 
potential of students who participate in the program. 
Some of these services include academic, personal, finan- 
cial, career, and professional/graduate school advisement; 
needs assessments, academic monitoring, and appropriate 
on-campus resource referrals, and on- and off-campus 
programs and student leadership conferences. For further 
information, please view the Website or call the program 
office. SSS is funded by the U.S. Department of 
Education in cooperation with Illinois State University. 

DEVELOPMENTAL MATH 



retention. The center's Learning Services component func- 
tions to provide academic support through content tutoring, 
writing assistance, and study skills workshops. The cen- 
ter's Targeted Retention Services component functions pri- 
marily to enhance the academic success and retention of 
minority and disadvantaged undergraduates at Illinois State 
University. The center's Student Success programming 
works to provide academic support for specific student 
populations. 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE TESTING SERVICES 

346 Fell Hall, Campus Box 4060 
(309) 438-2100 
www.ucollege.ilstu.edu/testing 

University College Testing Services administers college- 
related tests to facilitate transitions to and within the 
University. Testing provides undergraduate and graduate 
entrance exams, university course placement exams, exams for 
course credit, exams to meet graduation requirements, as well 
as professional and correspondence exams for the community. 
Please visit our Website or call the office for more information. 

COMPUTER AND INFORMATION SERVICES 

Campus Technology Support Group 
University Computer Help Desk 
IllinoisState.edu/heIpdesk 
(309) 438-HELP 



118 Schroeder Hall, Campus Box 4060 
(309) 438-3360 
www.ucollege.ilstu.edu/teaching/dev_math 

The Developmental Math unit of University College 
offers MAT 102 (Basic Algebra), and MAT 104 
(Intermediate Algebra) taught by student-centered instruc- 
tors in a warm, friendly atmosphere that is conducive to 
learning. Developmental Math students are strongly 
encouraged to make use of tutorial assistance provided by 
instructors, graduate assistants, and undergraduate teaching 
assistants in the University College mathematics lab. 

JULIA N. VISOR ACADEMIC CENTER 

012 Vrooman Hall, Campus Box 4070 
(309) 438-7100 
www.ucollege.ilstu.edu/about/visor 

The Julia N. Visor Academic Center provides services 
and programs designed to assist students in their pursuit of 
academic excellence at Illinois State University. These ser- 
vices and programs have been developed to impact student 



Appropriate Use Policy: The University's Appropriate 
Use Policy establishes the appropriate use of computing and 
telecommunication networks, computing equipment, and 
technology resources. Users must agree to abide by this poli- 
cy prior to gaining access to Illinois State resources. The pol- 
icy includes provisions for the observance of all copyright 
laws. The full text of the appropriate use policy is available 
at the following Website: www.policy.ilstu.edu. 

Student Computer Ownership Initiative: All new 

students to the University are required to bring a personal 
computer that meets the University's published minimum 
hardware and software standards. For mobility and flexi- 
bility reasons, laptops are strongly recommended. No stu- 
dent will be prevented from attending classes based on an 
inability to purchase a computer. Different financial 
resources are available to students including adding the 
cost of a computer to a student's "total cost of atten- 
dance." The cost of attendance is one of the factors that 
determines the amount of financial aid offered. 
Assistance, help, specifications, and more information on 
the policy can be found at TechZone, Bone Student 
Center 2nd floor, or www.techzone.ilstu.org. 



Academic Services and Opportunities 



37 



iCampus Portal: The iCampus portal, at www.icam- 
pus.ilstu.edu, allows students to plan and register for classes, 
view the Course Registration Directory and Planner; and 
view their grades, schedule, textbooks, financial aid status, 
email, Redbird card balance, view student paycheck stubs, 
sign up for direct deposit and more through a Web browser 
from anywhere in the world. 

Email account and storage space: Each student is 
given an Illinois State University email account for use in 
contacting faculty and classmates, as well as keeping in 
touch with friends and family at home. Students are respon- 
sible for checking their Illinois State account regularly, as 
the University uses it for official correspondence. Email is 
accessible on the Web at either webmail.ilstu.edu or 
www.icampus.ilstu.edu. In addition, each Illinois State stu- 
dent is given personal web and file storage space on a secure 
University server (DatastoreOl), available from an Internet- 
connected computer anywhere in the world. More informa- 
tion about DatastoreOl and how to configure your computer 
to access it is available at IllinoisState.edu/helpdesk. 

Internet Access: There are many convenient methods 
for connecting to Illinois State University over the Internet. 
All residence halls provide high-speed Ethernet access. 
There are also public network jacks and wireless connec- 
tivity available in many locations on campus for mobile 
laptop users, including areas in Milner Library, the Bone 
Student Center, and all residence hall dining areas. The 
University Computer Help Desk maintains a download site, 
which provides Illinois State students with browsers, email 
clients, virus protection, spyware detection, mobile printing 
software, and other useful tools, all configured to reach 
Illinois State resources. These software tools are available 
free of charge with a University login (ULID) and pass- 
word at IllinoisState.edu/helpdesk. 

Computer Security: To protect your computer and the 
campus network from viruses, worms, trojans, and the like, 
you must install the free anti-virus software provided by the 
University and set it to automatically update the virus defini- 
tion files. You must insure that your computer presents no 
risk to the campus community by installing free critical 
updates to the operating system. Computers vulnerable to 



viruses and the like will be blocked from accessing the net- 
work. Further information on computer security require- 
ments is available at www.helpdesk.ilstu.edu/security. 

Computer Laboratories: Personal computers (PCs) 
for doing work outside of class are available to students in 
over 75 computer labs at various locations on campus. PC 
and Macintosh computers are available, along with printers 
and scanners in some locations. Software tools such as 
email, browsers, word processing, graphics, spreadsheets, 
and course-specific software are available in varying con- 
figurations at all computer lab locations. 

Five of the larger computer labs are called University 
Labs, or uLabs. Two of the uLabs, in Stevenson 250 and 
Milner Library, are general purpose labs available to all stu- 
dents with a valid Illinois State University ID. The other 
three uLabs are general purpose labs located in three differ- 
ent residence halls, and are available to all residence hall stu- 
dents. Specific information about the uLabs, including 
operating hours, software available, and directions, may be 
found at IllinoisState.edu/ulabs. 

MATHEMATICS TUTOR CENTER 

330 Stevenson, (309) 438-8781 

The Mathematics Tutor Center provides tutorial assis- 
tance to students enrolled in most 100-level courses in 
Mathematics. Intensive remedial assistance is not provided. 
Interested students and faculty should contact the 
Mathematics Department for additional information. 

OFFICE OF THE UNIVERSITY 
REGISTRAR SERVICE CENTER 

107 Moulton Hall, (309) 438-2188 

The Office of the Registrar Service Center is the pri- 
mary public service area of the Office of the University 
Registrar, providing assistance to students registering for 
courses, applying for graduation, requesting transcripts 
and other selected services. Referrals are made to other 
offices as appropriate. Client service hours and additional 
information may be found by visiting the Website at 
www.registrar.ilstu.edu. 



38 



Academic Services and Opportunities 



Honors Programs 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Honors Program, Corner of North and Fell Streets 
Campus Box 6100, Normal, IL 61790-6100 
(309) 438-2559 

Director: Dr. Kim Pereira 
Website: IllinoisState.edu/honors 

The nationally recognized Honors Program at Illinois 
State University provides enriching educational opportuni- 
ties for academically talented students. Excellent students 
committed to their own personal development and to 
rewarding professional careers find that their Illinois State 
Honors education prepares them well for professional 
schools, graduate schools, and for satisfying employment 
after they graduate. Honors students enjoy the benefits of a 
small college in the rich context of a large multipurpose uni- 
versity. The University offers Honors students early registra- 
tion; special courses, taught by distinguished teachers and 
scholars; close, caring personal advisement by Honors 
Program advisors; unique opportunities for undergraduate 
research with world-class faculty scholars; special living 
accommodations which bring them into close acquaintance 
with other Honors students in academic and social programs; 
special awards and recognition; and other benefits. 

Successful graduates of the Honors Program attend top 
law schools, medical schools, and graduate schools. They 
also obtain outstanding employment in a wide array of pro- 
fessions and careers. 

ADMISSION TO THE HONORS PROGRAM 

Admission to the Honors Program is based on a variety 
of parameters. In keeping with the Illinois State University 
mission which describes us as a "diverse community of 
scholars," we are looking for highly motivated students who 
are committed to their careers and their community; who 
have demonstrated success in and out of the classroom; who 
are determined to have a positive impact on the university 
during their tenure here and on their society after they gradu- 
ate; and who offer the University diversity of discipline, 
background, and thinking. Applications require a personal 
statement designed to give the Honors Admissions 
Committee a sense of how motivated an applicant is to pur- 
sue academic work and to participate in the cultural life of 
the University. Students already enrolled in the University 
and incoming transfer students interested in Honors experi- 
ence and participation may also apply for admission to the 
Program, and must also submit a personal statement. 
Acceptance into the program is based on the analysis of all 
information submitted in applications. 

ACADEMIC SCHOLARSHIPS FOR NEW 
STUDENTS 

Illinois State University offers scholarship programs to 
support academically talented new freshmen and transfer 



students. University-wide scholarship programs are listed 
below, but various departments, schools, and colleges offer 
their own academic scholarships, many of which are for 
new students. For further information, contact the Office of 
Admissions, the Honors Program, the Scholarship 
Resource Office within the Financial Aid Office, or the col- 
lege or department/school associated with the program of 
study in which the student is interested. See also the 
Financial Assistance section of this catalog, which details 
additional academic scholarship programs. 

Presidential Scholarships: Presidential Scholarships 
are awarded to outstanding students based on academic per- 
formance, without regard to financial need. Recipients of 
these scholarships are chosen on the basis of academic 
accomplishments, scores on college admissions tests 
(ACT/SAT), demonstrated leadership qualities, evidence of 
commitment to service as well as an on-campus interview. 
Presidential Scholars receive an annual $8,000 award, 
renewable for up to four years contingent on the student's 
continued attainment of a 3.30 cumulative grade point 
average (GPA) and satisfactory progress in the 
Presidential Scholars Program. Finalists in National Merit 
and National Achievement Program competitions who 
enroll as Presidential Scholars and who list Illinois State 
as their first-choice school receive an additional $2,000 
for the freshman year. 

The application for admission to the University will 
determine eligibility to apply for the Presidential 
Scholarship. Qualified applicants will be sent an invita- 
tion to apply for the scholarship on a rolling basis begin- 
ning mid October. 

Recent Presidential Scholars have an average grade 
point average of 4.30 on a 4.00 scale, have ACT compos- 
ite scores in the lower 30s and higher, and demonstrate 
other meritorious traits as evidenced by their overall high 
school records. 

Presidential Scholarship winners are automatically 
admitted to the University's Honors Program and the 
Presidential Scholars Program, an exclusive academic pro- 
gram combining some of the best courses in the University 
with a student-selected course of study, involving Honors 
Program advisors and selected professors around the 
University. The program is designed to offer participants 
the advantages of a small liberal arts college within the 
framework of an outstanding multipurpose university. This 
program is international in character, requiring an interna- 
tional studies experience and foreign language study. It also 
has a service learning component, which enables students 
to earn academic credit for community service by bring- 
ing them into contact with local professionals, depending 
on student interest and career goals. 

Honors Scholarship: The Honors Program maintains 
a program of academic scholarships to support talented 
new freshmen in the Honors Program. These are tuition 
scholarships only for full-time study during the freshman 
year. Students are eligible to be considered for these 
scholarships when they have applied for and been accept- 
ed into the Honors Program. To ensure full consideration, 



Academic Services and Opportunities 39 



students should submit their applications, available from 
the Honors Program, no later than March 1st. Students 
who have applied for a Presidential Scholarship are auto- 
matically considered for the Honors Scholarship and do 
not need to submit a separate application. 

Honors students already enrolled at Illinois State are 
invited each spring to apply for tuition scholarships for the 
following summer and academic year. 

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS IN HONORS 

Honors Courses: Honors students enjoy special sec- 
tions of regular university courses, including courses in the 
General Education Program. They may also enroll in special 
courses taught by the university's distinguished scholars and 
teachers, including Advanced Colloquia on various topics, 
Independent Honors Study, Honors Undergraduate 
Research, and Honors Service Learning. Among the courses 
offered by the Honors Program are those listed at the end of 
this section of the catalog. 

Students may also complete an "In-Course" contract, 
negotiated with the faculty member, specifying require- 
ments for Honors credit. Work completed in an Honors 
section or through an approved In-Course contract will 
result in an "H" on the transcript, reflecting Honors cred- 
it, for students enrolled in the Honors Program. 

Opportunities for Undergraduate Research and 
Scholarship: The Honors Program sponsors several pro- 
grams designed to help students pursue research and schol- 
arship as undergraduates. This is an especially important 
opportunity for students aiming for advanced study in grad- 
uate or professional schools. Honors students have used 
such research opportunities as a basis for publishing arti- 
cles, networking with professors in their disciplines, and 
receiving national scholarships and academic prizes. The 
Program provides financial support for research through 
two programs: Honors Research Mentorships and the sum- 
mer Undergraduate Research Grants. Contact the Program 
for information about special curricular options involving 
undergraduate research. 

Senior Professionals of Illinois State University: 

The Honors Program works with an organization of retired 
professionals in Central Illinois and Senior Professionals 
of Illinois State University to offer a mentoring experience 
for Honors students at the University. The organization 
consists of retired individuals from various professions, 
including lawyers, judges, university faculty and adminis- 
trators, business executives, accountants, physicians, den- 
tists, and numerous other professionals. These 
professionals mentor honors students, helping them make 
connections in their chosen fields, offering them advice 
regarding their professional aspirations, providing social 
opportunities for them, and making scholarships available 
to them. This is a great opportunity, available only to 
Illinois State Honors students. Honors students may apply 
to participate in Senior Professionals Program at any time 
during their academic careers at Illinois State. 



Individually Designed Curricula: Honors students 
may, with the advice of select faculty members and Honors 
Program advisors, participate in the design of their own edu- 
cational curricula, reflecting their special interests and goals. 
This option, called the Faculty Colleague Program, includes 
individualized curricula for academic majors and minors and 
for General Education. It allows outstanding students the 
ability to shape for themselves useful curricular options that 
might not be available at any other university. 

Presidential Scholars Program: The Presidential 
Scholars Program is an exclusive and unique academic pro- 
gram which offers students holding Presidential Scholarships 
special curricula both in General Education and in their 
major course of study; opportunities for study abroad; and 
select service learning experiences. Presidential Scholars in 
this program enjoy special social activities, such as dinners 
with the President, and special advisement. For more infor- 
mation, see the section about Academic Scholarships in the 
Honors section of this catalog. 

Residential Programs for Honors Students: Students 
in the Honors Program may choose to live in Honors House 
in Hewett-Manchester Halls. Honors House offers select 
social, cultural, and intellectual programs for students. The 
sense of community found in Honors House makes it a popu- 
lar residence for Honors students. 

Competitive National and International 
Scholarships: The Honors Program maintains information 
about prestigious national and international scholarships. 
Many Illinois State students are eligible and can compete 
successfully for these scholarships. The Program assists stu- 
dents in applying for scholarships such as the Rhodes, 
Fulbright, Goldwater, Truman, Marshall, and Udall 
Scholarships, and many others. Students interested should 
attend scholarship informational workshops scheduled by the 
Honors Program, and they should contact the Honors 
Office for further information. 

CONTINUATION REQUIREMENTS 

Honors students are required to maintain a minimum 
cumulative Grade Point Average of 3.30 and are required to 
complete three hours of Honors credit each semester 
(excluding summer term). 

Honors Probation: Students whose cumulative GPA 
falls between 3.00 and 3.29 will be placed on Honors 
Probation, which allows them the opportunity to raise their 
GPA while enjoying the benefits of the Honors Program. 
Students must earn a minimum GPA of 3.30 each semester 
they are on Honors Probation and must raise their cumula- 
tive GPA to 3.30 within two semesters. First semester fresh- 
men will be placed on Honors Probation if their GPA falls 
between 2.70 and 3.29 and must also earn a minimum 
semester GPA of 3.30 for each semester they are on Honors 
Probation. First semester freshmen have until the end of their 
fourth semester to raise their cumulative GPA to 3.30. 
Students who fail to meet these requirements will be 
dropped from the program. 



40 



Academic Services and Opportunities 



Participation Requirements: Full-time Honors students 
must complete three credit hours of Honors coursework each 
fall and spring semester. Part-time Honors students must 
complete three credit hours of Honors coursework for every 
1 5 credit hours completed during the fall and spring semes- 
ters. Students who complete more than three hours of honors 
credit may use these hours toward the fulfillment of this par- 
ticipation requirement in a later semester. Honors students 
who complete 24 hours of Honors coursework are exempt 
from further participation requirements. Students can meet 
these participation requirements by enrolling in Honors sec- 
tions of regular courses, Honors Colloquia, Independent 
Honors Study, Honors Thesis, Undergraduate Research 
Participation or through an In-Course Honors Contract. 
Details about applying for In-Course Honors Contracts are 
available through the Honors Office. All In-Course Contracts 
are due in the Honors Office no later than the 1 5th day of the 
fall or spring semester. 

Suspension for Non-Participation: Honors students 
who do not meet the participation requirement for the fall 
or spring semester will be placed on Honors Suspension for 
the upcoming semester. Honors students on suspension 
may not participate in the early registration period and will 
be assigned to a later registration date. To regain good 
standing, suspended Honors students must complete three 
hours of Honors credit during the semester they are on 
Honors Suspension. Honors students who do not meet this 
requirement, or who subsequently fail to meet the partici- 
pation requirement will be dropped from the program and 
will not be eligible for readmission. 

ACADEMIC HONORS 

Dean's Lists: Undergraduates who meet high academic 
standards, as established by the college of their major, are 
included in a Dean's List issued each semester. Eligible stu- 
dents must complete 12 or more graded hours during the 
semester. Courses completed after the official end of the 
semester and courses taken with a CT/NC option will not 
be counted for this purpose. 

The Dean's List for the Colleges of Applied Science and 
Technology, Arts and Sciences, Education, Fine Arts, and 
Mennonite College of Nursing will include those students 
whose grade point averages place them among the top ten 
percent of those students majoring within the college based 
on their semester GPA. The Dean's List in the College of 
Business will include only undergraduate students majoring 
in business who have completed 12 or more semester hours 
with an overall semester grade point in the top ten percent, 
and at least a 3.33 GPA for all courses taken during the 
semester. Courses completed after the official end of the 
semester and courses taken with a credit/no credit option 
will not be counted for this purpose. Students whose major 
does not place them in one of the six colleges that offer 
classes and whose semester grade point average is within the 
top ten percent of the University are identified on the list of 
the Vice President and Provost. 



Robert G. Bone Scholarship: Bone Scholarships are 
the highest academic honor awarded to undergraduates, 
and many of them are awarded to Honors students. The 
University each year names 14 outstanding junior under- 
graduates as Robert G. Bone Scholars. Robert G. Bone was 
president of Illinois State from 1956 to 1967, and was so 
highly regarded by the University community that these spe- 
cial scholarships were established to honor his memory. 
Undergraduates can receive no higher honor from the 
University than to be awarded the Bone Scholarship. These 
scholarships recognize superior academic records, broad 
academic achievement, notable community and campus ser- 
vice, and demonstrated leadership. Students must be nomi- 
nated during spring semester of their junior year in order to 
apply for this award, and they must complete a rigorous 
application process in order to be selected. A university- 
wide committee, organized by the Honors Program, 
reviews applications and makes selections. 

Charles W. Bolen Senior Professionals Honors 
Student Award: Honors students mentored by Senior 
Professionals are eligible to apply for the $1,000 Charles 
W. Bolen Award. Awards are given each spring based on 
applicants' involvement with the Senior Professionals 
Program, academic accomplishments, and campus and 
community involvement. 

UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES WITH HONORS 

Degrees with Honor Distinction: Eligible students may 
graduate from Illinois State with traditional, Latin-named 
degrees with distinction: cum laude; magna cum laude; or 
summa cum laude. Many Honors students graduate with these 
distinctions. These designations are indicated both on a stu- 
dent's diploma and transcript. See the criteria under Degrees 
with Honor Distinction in the Degree Requirements section of 
this catalog. 

Honors students receiving undergraduate degrees may 
receive one or more Honors designations, available to stu- 
dents with various types of commitment to academic work 
beyond the basic catalog requirements. The following des- 
ignations are recorded permanently on student transcripts, 
and some of them are noted on diplomas. Such designa- 
tions help students gain entry into graduate and profes- 
sional schools, and enhance employment opportunities. 

Sophomore Honors Scholar: Students awarded this 
honor must meet the following conditions: (1) Earn 12 hours 
of Honors credit with grades of A or B; at least 6 hours must 
be through honors sections; (2) earn a cumulative grade 
point average of at least 3.40 at the end of the fourth semes- 
ter and be in good standing in the Honors Program; and (3) 
complete either option A or Option B that follows. 

OPTION A: (For students in the Honors Program first 
semester freshman year.) 

— Successfully complete IDS 102.17, Honors Freshman 
Seminar or IDS 102.70, Presidential Scholars Seminar 
with a grade of A or B; 



Academic Services and Opportunities 



41 



— Participate in 3 Honors Experiences: 

a. Attend and submit documentation for three Honors 
events as approved for this designation by the 
Honors Program. 

b. At least two different types of events are required: 
either one Research Mentorship presentation and two 
Honors Sponsored Speaker events or one Research 
Mentorship presentation, volunteer at the Undergraduate 
Research Symposium, and attend an Honors-sponsored 
speaker event (two acceptable ways to fulfill this 
requirement). 

c. Unless otherwise noted, documentation of participa- 
tion will be collected at the conclusion of the event. 

OPTION B: (For students starting in the Honors Program 
second semester freshman year.) 

— Participate in 4 Honors Experiences: 

Attend and submit documentation of four Honors events 
as approved for this designation by the Honors Program 
and meeting the criteria described above under Option 
A, in b and c. 

Honors Program Scholar: Students who graduate in 
good standing in the Honors Program with a Grade Point 
Average of 3.30 or higher, who have completed a mini- 
mum of 9 hours of Honors credit with grades of A or B, 
and have completed a minimum of 3 semesters in the 
Honors Program will be designated Honors Program 
Scholars. This designation is indicated on their transcript 
and in the Commencement Booklet. Honors Program 
Scholars wear a red cord at Commencement. 

Presidential Scholar: Honors Program Scholars who 
complete the requirements of the Presidential Scholars 
Program, have a minimum GPA of 3.30 and are in good 
standing at the time of graduation will be designated 
Presidential Scholars. This designation is indicated on stu- 
dent transcripts and in the Commencement Booklet. 
Presidential Scholars wear a silver cord at Commencement 
in lieu of the red cord. 

Honors Program Scholar with Merit: Students 
awarded this certificate must satisfy the following 
requirements: (1) Overall GPA of 3.50 at graduation; (2) 
at least 12 hours of Honors coursework, earning grades of 
A or B; (3) 4 semesters participation in the Honors 
Program; (4) at least one of the following Honors experi- 
ences: (a) Advanced Honors Colloquium, (b) 
Undergraduate Research Participation (3 semester hours), 
(c) Independent Honors Study (3 semester hours), or (d) 
Honors Thesis (3 semester hours). This designation is 
reflected on student transcripts. Students must apply for 
this designation to the Honors Office prior to graduation. 

Honors Program Scholar with Distinction: Students 
named Honors Program Scholars with Distinction, the 
highest Honors Program graduation designation, must sat- 
isfy the following requirements: (1) Overall GPA of 3.65 
at graduation; (2) 4 semesters participation in the Honors 



Program; and (3) at least 24 semester hours of Honors 
coursework with grades of A or B, including two different 
Honors experiences from the following: (a) Advanced 
Honors Colloquium, (b) Honors Undergraduate Research 
Participation (3 semester hours), (c) Independent Honors 
Study (3 semester hours), (d) Honors Thesis (3 semester 
hours), (e) being designated a Departmental Honors 
Scholar, or (f) satisfactorily completing an Honors 
Research Mentorship. This designation is indicated on 
student transcripts and diplomas following approval of a 
student application for this designation to the Honors 
Office prior to graduation. 

Departmental Honors Scholar: Must be a member of 
the Honors Program in good standing at the time of gradua- 
tion. Special academic work leading to a student in the 
Honors Program being designated as a Departmental Honors 
Scholar is available in all academic departments or schools 
in the University. The criteria for becoming a Departmental 
Honors Scholar vary from one department or school to 
another, ranging from a specific sequence of courses to writ- 
ing and defending special theses or completing special 
research projects. Criteria for this designation are available 
in the Honors Program Office or in various departmental 
offices. This designation is indicated on student transcripts 
and diplomas following approval of a student application for 
this designation to the Honors Office prior to graduation. 

CAMPUS HONOR SOCIETIES 

Illinois State University sponsors numerous discipline- 
specific and general honor societies across campus, ranging 
from organizations which are solely honorific to those 
honor societies which offer service to the campus and com- 
munity, giving students the opportunity to develop academ- 
ic networks, and leadership and social skills. Honor 
societies specific to the various academic disciplines are 
sponsored by different academic departments at Illinois 
State, while general honor societies are sponsored at the 
college or university level. The Honors Program maintains 
information about honor societies on campus, and students 
interested in possibly becoming members should contact 
the appropriate society. 

Honors Courses 

IDS 

102 HONORS COLLOQUIUM 
1-4 sem. hrs. 

Interdisciplinary, for students in the Honors Program. 
Weekly sessions, presented by one or more specialists on the 
topic, explore a semester theme. May be repeated once for 
credit if topic is different. 

202 ADVANCED HONORS COLLOQUIUM 
3 sem. hrs. 

Weekly sessions presented by a specialist dealing with a 
semester's topic for advanced students in the Honors 
Program. May be repeated once if topic is different. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent Honors Director. 



42 



Academic Services and Opportunities 



225 NATIONAL COLLEGIATE 
HONORS EXCHANGE 
1-6 sem. hrs. 

Honors study for one semester at another university. 
Prerequisite: Participation in Illinois State Honors Program. 

285 HONORS UNDERGRADUATE 
RESEARCH 

1-3 sem. hrs. 

Honors student assists a faculty member on the faculty 
member's research project. May be repeated. Prerequisite: 
Consent Director of Honors. 

286 HONORS UNDERGRADUATE 
RESEARCH II 

1-3 sem. hrs. 

Continuation of IDS 285. May be repeated. Prerequisite: 
IDS 285. 

299 INDEPENDENT HONOR STUDY 
1-6 sem. hrs. 

Intensive work in a special area of the student's major or 
minor. Each individual project is to culminate in a compre- 
hensive written report or examination. Maximum of 6 hours 
may be applied toward graduation. Limit of 9 hours of IDS 
299 and 395 combined may count toward graduation. 
Prerequisites: Open only to students in the Honors Program 
who have achieved superior academic records and who have 
demonstrated an ability to profit from independent study. 
Consent instructor, department chair or school director, and 
Director of Honors. 

395 HONORS THESIS 
1-6 sem. hrs. 

Intensive research in a special area of the student's major. 
Each individual project is to culminate in a comprehensive 
written thesis and an oral defense of the thesis. Maximum of 
6 hours may be applied toward graduation. Limit of 9 hours 
of IDS 299 and 395 combined may count toward gradua- 
tion. Prerequisites: Open only to students in the Honors 
Program who have achieved superior academic records and 
who have demonstrated an ability to profit from indepen- 
dent study. Consent instructor, department chair/school 
director, and Director of Honors. 



Additional Academic Opportunities 

UNDERGRADUATE TEACHING 
ASSISTANTS 

Undergraduate Teaching Assistantships (UTA) are 
available in nearly all departments of the University to 
juniors and seniors who have demonstrated excellence in a 
particular discipline and high overall scholastic achieve- 
ment. The purpose of the program is to assist the faculty in 
the improvement of instruction and to provide UTAs with 
a valuable learning opportunity. 

Undergraduate Research Assistantships (URA) are 
available in selected departments for students who have 



demonstrated excellence in a particular discipline with sig- 
nificant potential in research. The purpose of the program 
is to work closely with faculty members and to provide 
students valuable opportunities for research. 

The responsibilities and nature of the UTA and URA 
assignments are determined by the departments and col- 
leges. Some departments provide the opportunity for cred- 
it to be earned by the UTA under a General Offerings 
course (291 Seminar: Undergraduate Teaching Assistants). 
Three hours is the maximum amount of this credit that may 
be allowed for graduation. Tuition and fees are assessed in 
the usual manner for all credit earned in the UTA and URA 
experiences. Application forms are available in the depart- 
mental and college offices. 

UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH 

Research is considered a vital component in the devel- 
opment of undergraduates at Illinois State. All students 
have the opportunity and are encouraged to participate in 
scholarly research during their university experience. 

Illinois State explicitly views research as more than 
the traditional concept of expanding basic knowledge, 
favoring a definition that requires the application of such 
knowledge in resolving societal problems. Students have 
the opportunity to work in collaboration with 
Distinguished Professors and Outstanding University 
Researchers. As is true for all research, undergraduate 
students should ensure that any research projects involv- 
ing living human subjects have been approved by the 
Institutional Review Board (IRB). Research projects 
involving living animals require the approval of the 
Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC). 
Research involving biohazards must be reviewed by the 
Institutional Biosafety Committee (IBC). If questions 
exist, discuss this with your faculty supervisor or contact 
Research Ethics and Compliance, Professional 
Development Building at (309) 438-845 1 . 

Student research, scholarship, and creative accomplish- 
ment are showcased each spring in the Undergraduate 
Research Symposium sponsored by the Graduate School, 
Research and Sponsored Programs, Milner Library, and the 
Honors Program. Students must be enrolled and engaged in 
research under the direction of a faculty mentor. 

The symposium recognizes and promotes student 
research, scholarship and creative achievement by providing 
a professional setting in which students present. For more 
information about the Research Symposium, please visit 
www.grad.ilstu.edu/symposium. 

In addition to recognizing and encouraging research at 
the undergraduate level, this event will also provide pro- 
fessional advancement experience. Presenters at the sym- 
posium are eligible to apply for travel reimbursement for 
research presented at off-campus professional conferences. 
Funds are available through the Graduate School when 
matched by department/school funding. 



Academic Services and Opportunities 



43 



International Study and NSE 

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES AND PROGRAMS 

301-311 Fell Hall, (309) 438-5276 
Internationalstudies.IUinoisState.edu 

The Office of International Studies and Programs 
(OISP) is the focal point for international activities at Illinois 
State University. The University's full scope of international 
activities - undergraduate, graduate, professional, research 
and training - are coordinated by this office. 

The primary mission of OISP is to internationalize edu- 
cational programs, research and training opportunities; 
hence advance the understanding of international and 
cross-cultural issues across campus and for the community 
at large. 

International Student and Scholar Services: The 

mission of International Student and Scholar Services is to 
provide guidance and support to international students and 
scholars. The unit is responsible for immigration advise- 
ment and academic assistance and offers a variety of ser- 
vices for international students and scholars including an 
extensive orientation. The unit is also engaged in outreach 
through community-based organizations. 

Management Development International (MDI): 

Management Development International conducts profes- 
sional certificate and diploma training programs, as well as 
custom-designed training programs, in a variety of fields for 
international clientele. Programs are offered on-site at 
Illinois State and at many other locations around the world. 

International House: International House is a multicul- 
tural living and learning center for American and internation- 
al students at Illinois State. The primary responsibility of the 
International House Unit is to promote diversity among 
American and international students and to contribute to 
international understanding through commitment to develop- 
ing friendships, providing cultural learning opportunities and 
offering programs which extend these primary goals to the 
wider university and to the Bloomington/Normal community. 

Unit for International Linkages: The Office of 
International Studies and Programs has established the Unit 
for International Linkages to increase scholarly activity and 
research throughout the world. The unit pursues and coordi- 
nates linkages with institutions in countries around the world. 

National Student Exchange Programs 

The National Student Exchange (NSE) provides an 
opportunity for undergraduate students to attend a mem- 
ber college or university in another state for up to two 
semesters while earning credit toward their home 
school's degree program. Illinois State is one of only 
three universities in the State of Illinois that participates 
in the NSE program. Such exchanges offer students the 
opportunity for cross-cultural interaction and exposure to 
geographic, economic and political diversity, as well as 
personal growth. 



222 NATIONAL STUDENT EXCHANGE 
12-16 sem. hrs. 

Study for 1 semester or 1 year at another university, paying 
tuition and fees at Illinois State University. Prerequisites: 
Minimum of sophomore standing; 2.50 GPA. Participation 
in National Student Exchange program. 

223 NATIONAL STUDENT EXCHANGE 
12-16 sem. hrs. 

Study for 1 semester or 1 year at another university, paying 
tuition and fees at that university. Prerequisites: Minimum of 
sophomore standing; 2.50 GPA. Participation in National 
Student Exchange program. 

225 NATIONAL COLLEGIATE HONORS EXCHANGE 
1-6 sem. hrs. 

Honors study for one semester at another university. 
Prerequisite: Participation in Illinois State Honors Program. 

Semester Study Abroad Programs 

Study Abroad offers students opportunities that pro- 
vide cross-cultural interaction, exposure to geographic, 
economic and political diversity and a vehicle for personal 
growth and adaptation in a foreign environment. The unit 
provides year-round orientations, consultation and advise- 
ment, and follow-ups to assist students and program direc- 
tors on a continuous basis before, during and after their 
study abroad experience. 



IDS 



133 INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDY ABROAD 
1-6 sem. hrs. 

Study abroad. Specific topics and regions as approved and 
indicated by decimal and extended title. Formerly IDS 1 89. 
May repeat if content differs. 

230 INTERNATIONAL EXCHANGE 
12-15 sem. hrs. 

Study for 1 semester or 1 year in another country. 

CURTIN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY, 
PERTH, WESTERN AUSTRALIA 
12-15 sem. hrs. 

Semester/year program. A wide variety of undergraduate 
and graduate courses are offered for elective and major 
field credit. 

EDITH COWAN UNIVERSITY, PERTH, 
WESTERN AUSTRALIA 
12-15 sem. hrs. 

Semester/year program. A wide variety of undergraduate and 
graduate courses are offered for elective and major field credit. 

GRIFFITH UNIVERSITY 
QUEENSLAND, AUSTRALIA 

12-15 sem. hrs. 

Semester/year program. A wide variety of undergraduate and 
graduate courses are offered for elective and major field credit. 

SALZBURG COLLEGE, SALZBURG, AUSTRIA 
15-17 sem. hrs. 

Semester/year program focusing on social sciences, busi- 
ness, communication, humanities, and fine arts. Elective and 
major field credit available. Courses taught in English. 



44 



Academic Services and Opportunities 



DALHOUSIE UNIVERSITY, HALIFAX, 
NOVA SCOTIA - CANADA 
12-15 sem. hrs. 

Semester/year program. A variety of undergraduate and 
graduate courses in Business are offered for elective and 
major field credit. 

UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG, CHINA 
12-15 sem. hrs. 

Semester/year program. A wide variety of courses are 
offered in English. Chinese language courses are available. 

BRIGHTON UNIVERSITY, 
EASTBOURNE, ENGLAND 
12-15 sem. hrs. 

Semester program. Elementary and Early Childhood 
Education Student Teaching. All programs are coordinated 
by Brighton University. 

CANTERBURY CHRIST CHURCH 
UNIVERSITY, CANTERBURY, ENGLAND 
12-15 sem. hrs. 

Semester program. Undergraduate courses in art, history, lit- 
erature, culture, and geography. 

LEICESTER UNIVERSITY, LEICESTER, ENGLAND 
15 sem. hrs. 

Semester/year program offering courses in a wide variety 
of undergraduate disciplines for major and minor credit. 

UNIVERSITY OF SUNDERLAND, 
SUNDERLAND, ENGLAND 
15 sem. hrs. 

Semester/year program. A wide variety of major/minor 
credits available. 

L'UNIVERSITE CATHOLIQUE, DE L'OUEST 
D'ANGERS, ANGERS, FRANCE 
15 sem. hrs. 

Semester/year program focusing on French language, culture 
and civilization. 

L'ECOLE SUPERIEURE DES SCIENCE 
COMMERCIALES D'ANGERS, 
ANGERS, FRANCE 
12-15 sem. hrs. 

Spring program. A variety of undergraduate courses in 
Business and French language are offered for elective and 
major field credit. 

RHEINISCHE FRIEDRICH-WILHELMS 
UNIVERSITAT, BONN, GERMANY 
12 sem. hrs. 

Semester/year program. German language program open to 
juniors, seniors and graduate students. Prerequisites: 
Major/minor in German language and literature required; 
must have completed 211.13 and 213.13 before leaving for 
the program. 

UNIVERSITAT GESAMTHOCHSCHULE 
PADERBORN, PADERBORN GERMANY 
12-15 sem. hrs. 

Spring program offering Business courses in both English 
and German. Students will be enrolled in a three-month 
intensive German language course. 



L'ECOLE SUPERIEURE DES SCIENCE 
COMMERCIALES, D'ANGERS 
BUDAPEST, HUNGARY 
12-15 sem. hrs. 

Semester/year program. A variety of undergraduate courses 
in Business are offered for elective and major field credit. 

UNIVERSITY OF LIMERICK, 
LIMERICK, IRELAND 
12-15 sem. hrs. 

Semester/year program offering courses in a wide variety 
of disciplines for major/minor field credit. 

SCUOLA LORENZO DE'MEDICI, 
FLORENCE, ITALY 
12-15 sem. hrs. 

Semester/year program. Italian language, business, commu- 
nication, culture, civilization, art history, studio art. Courses 
offered in English. Major/minor field credit available in art. 

KANSAI GAIDAI UNIVERSITY, 
HIRAKATA, JAPAN 
14-17 sem. hrs. 

Semester/year program. A wide variety of courses are 
offered in English. Previous language experience not 
required. Intensive Japanese language courses available for 
Foreign Language credit. 

NAGOYA GAKUIN UNIVERSITY, 
NAGOYA, JAPAN 
15-17 sem. hrs. 

Semester/year program offering courses in Japanese 
Language and Civilization. Students must take an intensive 
Japanese language course. 

NANZAN UNIVERSITY, NAGOYA, JAPAN 
15-17 sem. hrs. 

Semester/year program. A wide variety of courses are 
offered in English. Students must take 10 hours of intensive 
Japanese language. 

DONG AH INSTITUTE OF MEDIA AND ARTS, 
ANSUNG CITY, KOREA 
12-15 sem. hrs. 

Semester/year program. A variety of undergraduate 
courses in Communication are offered for elective and 
major field credit. 

MONTERREY INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 
(ITESM), QUERETARO, MEXICO 
12-15 sem. hrs. 

Semester/year program. A variety of undergraduate courses 
in Business are offered for elective and major field credit. 
Some graduate credit available. 

STIRLING UNIVERSITY, 
STIRLING, SCOTLAND 
15 sem. hrs. 

Semester/year program. Courses for major/minor field 
credit are available in many departments. Students take 3 
courses per semester, each worth 5 credit hours. 

UNIVERSIDAD DE GRANADA, 
GRANADA, SPAIN 
12 sem. hrs. 

Semester/year program focusing on Spanish language, cul- 
ture and civilization. Prerequisite: Completion of SPA 116, 
or equivalent. 



Academic Services and Opportunities 



45 



UNIVERSIDAD COMPLUTENSE 
DE MADRID, MADRID, SPAIN 
12 sem. hrs. 

Semester/year program focusing on Spanish language, cul- 
ture and civilization. Prerequisites: Completion of SPA 
116.15 or equivalent. 

UPPSALA UNIVERSITY, UPPSALA, SWEDEN 
15 sem. hrs. 

Semester/year program offering courses in a wide variety 
of disciplines for maj/min field credit. Courses are taught 
in English. Special course in Swedish civilization offered 
during fall semester. 

NATIONAL CHENGCHI UNIVERSITY (NCCU) 
TAIPEI, TAIWAN 
12-15 sem. hrs. 

Semester/year program. A wide variety of courses are 
offered in English. Previous language experience not 
required. Intensive Mandarin Chinese language courses 
available for Foreign Language credit. 

THAMMASAT UNIVERSITY 
BANGKOK, THAILAND 
12-17 sem. hrs. 

Semester/year program. A variety of undergraduate and 
graduate courses in Business with specific emphasis on 
accounting, finance and banking, and marketing are offered 
for elective and major field credit. 

NOTE: Summer programs all over the world give students 
the opportunity to earn 3-10 hours of credit. Consult with an 
advisor in International Studies for additional information. 

Admission of international students is processed through 
the Office of Admissions at Illinois State University. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE INSTITUTE 

English Language Institute is part of the College of Arts 
and Sciences. International student immigration and advising 
are coordinated through International Studies and Programs. 

Intensive English Program at 
English Language Institute (Hudelson Building), 
(309) 438-2072; email: ELI@IUinoisState.edu; or 
Website: www.ELI.ilstu.edu 

Illinois State University's English Language Institute 
(ELI) provides a special non-degree intensive program (20- 
hours per week) in English as a Second Language with equal 
emphasis on both communicative and academic needs for 
international students who wish to increase their English 
proficiency for college-level work or for international stu- 
dents on exchange programs. After the first semester, qual- 
ifying students can enroll in one regular University class in 
addition to their ELI program. In general, students enroll at 
ELI as full-time students for a semester or more. 

Although admission to ELI does not guarantee subse- 
quent admission to a degree program at the University, ELI 
students who attain a satisfactory TOEFL score can be 



admitted to a degree program at the University, provided 
they also meet the other requirements for admission. Hence, 
international students who do not have the minimum 
TOEFL score for admission to a degree program are 
encouraged to attend ELI first to prepare for admission to 
such a program at the University. Most students live in 
the University's campus housing, which gives them a 
chance to interact with students of all backgrounds. 

International applicants who meet all other academic 
criteria for admission but whose TOEFL score is less than 
550 (paper-based), 213 (computer-based), or 79 (iBT) may 
be admitted to a degree program. In such cases, students will 
be required to attend courses at the English Language 
Institute (ELI) at their own expense and remain in the pro- 
gram until their English proficiency improves to the level 
required for University enrollment. 

For further information, contact English Language 
Institute, Campus Box 6123; Fax: (309) 438-3031; phone: 
(309) 438-2072; Website: www.ELI.ilstu.edu; or email: 
ELI@IllinoisState.edu. 

Preparation for Graduate School 

PREPARATION FOR GRADUATE STUDY 

While many graduates proceed immediately to the 
working world upon receipt of their bachelor's degree, oth- 
ers choose to pursue their education further. 

Requirements for admission to advanced study vary 
according to the profession as well as among the schools. 
Thus, a student planning to enter a professional school 
should seek specific admission information from the school 
he or she plans to attend. Preparation for admission to a pro- 
fessional or graduate school consists of (1) a broad educa- 
tional experience, (2) courses that meet the specific 
admission requirements of the school the student plans to 
attend, (3) major and minor subjects that allow for concen- 
trated study in a field of interest and that provide an alterna- 
tive career direction if it becomes desirable, (4) relevant 
work or research experience, and (5) standardized test 
scores, such as the GRE, GMAT, LSAT, MCAT, etc. 

GRADUATE SCHOOL 

309 Hovey Hall, (309) 438-2583 

The Graduate School offers master's degree programs 
in most fields in which undergraduate programs are avail- 
able. Doctoral degree programs are available in Audiology, 
Biological Sciences, Curriculum and Instruction, 
Educational Administration, English Studies, Mathematics 
Education, Nursing, School Psychology, and Special 
Education. A Specialist in School Psychology degree is 
offered as well as over 15 graduate certificates. 

Students interested in graduate study at Illinois State 
should consult the Graduate Catalog for admission 
requirements and available programs. It is recommended 



46 



Academic Services and Opportunities 



that undergraduates contemplating future education take 
the necessary standardized test in the early part of their 
senior year. These test scores, along with transcripts, usual- 
ly are necessary not only for admission but to attain various 
forms of financial support, e.g., Graduate Assistantships. 
Further information also may be obtained from departmen- 
tal/school offices or at www.grad.ilstu.edu. 

Preparation for Professional 
Study 

ENGINEERING 

Illinois State University Physics Department directs a 
joint Engineering/Physics program shared with a partner 
engineering university such as the University of Illinois or 
Bradley University. Students begin at Illinois State and 
transfer to their chosen partner engineering university after 
completing 90 semester hours. Students receive a B.S. in 
Engineering from the partner university upon completion of 
their Engineering requirements. They receive a second B.S. 
in Physics from Illinois State upon transferring back 30 
approved hours from the engineering university. Students 
major in Engineering Physics while at Illinois State. 

The Engineering Physics program is listed under the 
Physics programs section of the Undergraduate Catalog. 
Engineering Physics majors benefit from small class size and 
close student-faculty interactions in the Physics Department. 
This five-year program offers greater depth than the average 
engineering curriculum and provides students with the addi- 
tional problem solving and scientific foundations needed to 
design the rapidly changing technologies of the future. Due to 
the sequential nature of engineering curricula, it is important 
that appropriate course selections be made. Interested stu- 
dents should contact the Department of Physics at (309) 438- 
8756 or info@phy.ilstu.edu early in their academic careers 
for help in developing an appropriate plan of study. 

LAW 

Law schools do not require any specific courses or 
undergraduate majors. A committee of the Association of 
American Law Schools has recommended that the prelaw 
student keep in mind three basic objectives in planning an 
undergraduate program: education for articulate oral and 
written expression; education for greater understanding of 
human institutions and values; and education to develop the 
skills of conceptual analysis. The committee has emphasized 
the need for a broad, liberal education that develops the stu- 
dent's intellectual interests rather than an education directed 
too pointedly toward later professional training and practice. 

Students planning to apply for admission to law school 
should consult the University's prelaw advisor, Dr. Robert 
C. Bradley, Department of Politics and Government, (309) 
438-8944, for information about the Law School 
Admissions Test and for assistance in selecting and apply- 
ing to suitable law schools. 



HEALTH PROFESSIONS 

Students who plan to apply to professional school 
usually major in one of the departments in the College of 
Arts and Sciences, but they can major in any subject with 
careful planning. Majors in Biological Sciences or 
Chemistry usually are elected because several specific 
preprofessional course requirements can be applied toward a 
major in these fields. However, a major in any one of a num- 
ber of other departments in the College is appropriate for 
many students who have a specific career goal in mind. 
Economics, foreign languages, mathematics, physics, psy- 
chology, sociology, and speech pathology and audiology are 
several examples of academic areas that have application to 
specialties within the health professions. 

Minimum admission requirements to colleges of 
medicine, dentistry, and veterinary medicine are dis- 
cussed below. Further information about admission pro- 
cedures to these and other health-related professional 
colleges can be obtained by contacting the preprofession- 
al advisor in the School of Biological Sciences, (309) 
438-8252 or by going on line to www.bio.ilstu.edu. 

Medicine: Admission requirements of individual 
medical colleges are set forth in Medical School 
Admissions Requirements — United States and Canada. 
Orders for this book should be addressed to: 

Association of American Medical Colleges 
2450 N. Street, NW 
Publications Department 
Washington, DC 20037-1 129 

To order by phone: (202) 828-0416, fax (202) 828-1123, 
or on the Website: at www.aamc.org. 

Specific course requirements of medical schools in the 
state of Illinois can be met by taking the following courses: 

Chemistry 140, 141, 230, 231, 232, and 233 
Biological Sciences 196, 197 
Physics 108, 109 
Behavior Sciences (9 hours) 
English and Speech (9 hours) 
Mathematics 145, 146 are recommended 

Other specific course requirements usually are met by 
completion of the General Education program. It should 
be understood that a careful selection of general educa- 
tion and elective courses beyond the specific admission 
requirements can make the applicant more competitive. 

Although a few students are accepted for enrollment 
in medical college after completion of 90 semester hours, 
they are distinct exceptions. Most students should antici- 
pate the completion of the requirements for a bachelor's 
degree with the following approximate timetable: 

1 . Completion of specific course requirements by the end 
of the junior year. 

2. Medical College Admission Test taken in the spring of 
or the summer following the junior year. 



3. Medical College application process begun in June, 
preceding senior year. 

Dentistry: Admission policies of individual dental 
schools are set forth in Official Guide to Dental Schools. 
Book orders should be addressed to: 

American Dental Education Association 
1625 Massachusetts Avenue, NW 
Washington, DC 20036-2212 

To order by phone: (202) 667-9433 or on the Website: 
www.adea.org 

In addition to the completion of the General Education 
program, the following courses would meet the minimum 
specific course requirements for Illinois dental schools: 

Chemistry 140, 141; CHE 230, 231; 232-233; 242 or 342. 
Biological Sciences 196, 197 
Physics 108, 109 

Most students enter dental school after three or four 
years of preprofessional studies. The minimum require- 
ment for admission to dental schools in the state of 
Illinois is two years of college, even though most such 
applicants are unsuccessful. It is therefore advised that 
students anticipate at least a three-year program with the 
following timetable: 



Academic Services and Opportunities 47 

1 . Completion of biology and chemistry course require- 
ments by the end of the sophomore year. 

2. Dental Admission Test taken in April of the sopho- 
more year or by October of the junior year. 

3. Dental college application process is begun in the sum- 
mer preceding the junior year. 

Veterinary Medicine: Illinois residents find it exceed- 
ingly difficult to gain admission to colleges of veterinary 
medicine outside the state. Students should therefore direct 
their attention largely to the admission policies of the 
University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine. 

Specific course requirements: 5 semesters of biology 
with laboratory, including 3 semesters of 200- or 300-level 
courses; 4 semesters of chemistry, including organic 
chemistry and biochemistry; 2 semesters of physics; 2 
semesters of English; 4 semesters of humanities and social 
sciences. One semester of animal science is recommended. 
Some two-year students are accepted, but the majority of 
successful candidates have 3 or 4 years of preprofessional 
study. Students are therefore advised to plan their program 
for completion of the requirements for admission to veteri- 
nary college by the end of the sophomore year. A four- 
year program leading to a bachelor's degree should be 
anticipated in the event that early application to veterinary 
college is not successful. 



48 




49 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PRACTICES 



Degree Requirements 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 
FOR GRADUATION 

The following graduation requirements apply to all 
students. Meeting graduation requirements is the individ- 
ual responsibility of each student. The student and advi- 
sor should check the student's program of courses 
frequently to ensure that the student is fulfilling the fol- 
lowing graduation requirements (all references to hours 
indicate semester credit hours). 

A. Total Hours: The actual hour requirement for an 
undergraduate degree varies by the program or com- 
bination of programs that a student elects. A student 
must have a minimum of 1 20 hours of credit accept- 
able toward graduation. Some courses may not count 
toward graduation. These restrictions are noted in the 
course descriptions. Some curricula or combinations 
of fields require additional hours. If all specified 
requirements are completed with fewer than 120 
hours, a student must elect sufficient additional 
course work to total at least 120 hours. 

B. Specific B.A./B.S. Requirements: There are a variety 
of baccalaureate degrees. Students graduating from 
B.A. or B.S. degree programs must meet specific 
requirements beyond major and other graduation 
requirements. A student pursuing the B.A. degree will 
acquire knowledge of a foreign language as demon- 
strated by successful completion of LAN 115 (or the 
equivalent). A student seeking a B.A. degree takes 
LAN 115 in place of Middle Core Quantitative 
Reasoning. A student pursuing the B.S. degree will 
complete a three-hour natural science, mathematics, 
statistics, or technology (SMT) course beyond General 
Education requirements. (See Degree Programs.) 

NOTE: All graduates of the College of Arts and 
Sciences must satisfy a foreign language graduation 
requirement that may be met by: 3 years of one for- 
eign language in high school or completion of the 
second semester or higher of college-level foreign 
language with a passing grade or equivalent profi- 
ciency as determined by examination. Students who 
have successfully completed one semester of college 
foreign language credit may elect to satisfy this 
requirement by studying abroad in an approved pro- 
gram in a non-English speaking country. American 
Sign Language may be used to fulfill this require- 
ment by transfer credit or by proficiency. 

C. General Education: There are three ways to com- 
plete General Education requirements at Illinois 



State University. The first way is to complete 
Illinois State's General Education Program. The sec- 
ond way is to complete the Illinois Transferable 
General Education Core Curriculum available 
through the Illinois Articulation Initiative (IAI). This 
program, designed for transfer students, is a statewide 
agreement between participating colleges and universi- 
ties and some private schools that is designed to facili- 
tate timely degree completion. The third way is to 
complete a baccalaureate-oriented Associates Degree 
(A.A. or A.S.) from a regionally accredited post sec- 
ondary institution. The holder of an A.A. or A.S. 
degree is admitted to Illinois State University with 
junior standing and all General Education requirements 
completed, (see Degree Programs) 

D. Major-Minor Options: Each candidate for B.S. or 
B.A. degrees must complete a major field of study. 
Completion of a second major, a minor, or a second 
minor is optional unless specified by the student's 
major. A teacher education student who is a candidate 
for a B.S., B.A., B.S. in Ed., or B.M.E. degree must 
complete professional education requirements and a 
major approved for teacher education. Some teacher 
education programs require the completion of require- 
ments for a second teaching field. A student may count 
no more than nine hours from a major toward a minor 
within the same department or school. This policy 
applies to both first and second majors and minors. 

Note: Students completing requirements for two majors 
concurrently are eligible to receive only one degree. 
The degree awarded is based on the degree correspond- 
ing to the primary major. One diploma is issued to the 
student upon completion of both majors and all other 
degree requirements. 

E. Senior College Hours: The senior college hours 
(courses numbered 200 or above) must total at least 42 
hours. Coursework transferred from other colleges and 
universities is not counted as senior college credit if 
freshmen and sophomores are regularly permitted to 
enroll in such work. No credit from two-year colleges 
may be counted as senior level. 

F. Grade Point Average: The grade point average for all 
courses taken at Illinois State University must be 2.00 
(C) or higher. In addition, the student must have a 
grade point average of 2.00 (C) (or higher as required 
by certain programs) in the courses required in the 
major, and the minor if the student has a minor. 

G. Removal of Incompletes: A student may not graduate 
with incomplete grades. Each Incomplete grade (I) must 
be removed at least six weeks before December or May 
graduation, or two weeks before August graduation. 



Academic Policies and Practices 



H. Residence Requirements: Unless otherwise specified in 
a specific program, at least 30 of the last 60 hours com- 
pleted toward the baccalaureate degree must be earned at 
Illinois State. 

I. Time Limit for Courses as Prerequisites: Because 
disciplinary knowledge advances and course content 
changes as a consequence, some courses taken seven or 
more years prior to an advance registration period will 
not automatically be accepted as prerequisites for other 
courses. When a department or school determines that 
applicability of a course will lapse, it will designate this 
in the prerequisite listing as "taken within x years." For 
example, for MAT 146, the prerequisites might read "C 
or better in MAT 145 taken within 10 years required." 

J. Global Studies Requirement: Every student gradu- 
ating from Illinois State University must have suc- 
cessfully completed a course designated as a course in 
the cultures and traditions of societies or peoples from 
Asia, the Middle East, Africa, Latin America, or 
Indigenous Peoples of the World. Such designations 
are located in course descriptions. 

K. Professional Practice and Independent Study: A stu- 
dent may count no more than 16 hours of professional 
practice courses (198, 298, 398) toward graduation. 
Some programs allow fewer than 16 hours. A student 
may count no more than 6 hours of independent study 
(287) credit toward graduation. 

BACCALAUREATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Undergraduate degrees available at Illinois State 
University include the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of 
Science, Bachelor of Science in Education, Bachelor of 
Science in Nursing, Bachelor of Fine Arts, Bachelor of 
Music, Bachelor of Music Education and Bachelor of 
Social Work degrees. When applying for graduation, the 
student indicates the specific degree which he or she is 
qualified to receive. 

Note: Students completing requirements for two majors con- 
currently are eligible to receive only one degree. The degree 
awarded is based on the degree corresponding to the primary 
major. One diploma is issued to the student upon completion 
of both majors and all other degree requirements. 
Requirements are specified for each degree below. 

Statement of Purpose for the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) 
Degree: The Bachelor of Arts degree provides for the acqui- 
sition of written and oral communication skills, creative 
thinking, abilities in the critical analysis of texts, the under- 
standing of cultures, and a working knowledge of social, 
political, and historical contexts. The degree is typically pur- 
sued by those students whose academic emphasis in their 
major area of study is directed toward the humanities, arts, 
and selected areas of the social sciences disciplines. 

Statement of Requirements for the Bachelor of 
Arts (B.A.) Degree: General Education requirements, 



general requirements for graduation, and knowledge of a 
foreign language as demonstrated by successful comple- 
tion of LAN 115 (or the equivalent). A student seeking a 
B.A. degree takes LAN 115 in place of Middle Core 
Quantitative Reasoning. 

NOTE: All graduates of the College of Arts and 
Sciences must satisfy a foreign language graduation require- 
ment that may be met by: 3 years of one foreign language in 
high school or completion of the second semester or higher 
of college-level foreign language with a passing grade or 
equivalent proficiency as determined by examination. 
Students who have successfully completed one semester of 
college foreign language credit may elect to satisfy this 
requirement by studying abroad in an approved program in a 
non-English speaking country. American Sign Language 
may be used to fulfill this requirement by transfer credit or 
by proficiency. 

Statement of Purpose for the Bachelor of Science 
(B.S.) Degree: The Bachelor of Science degree provides for 
the acquisition of oral and written communication skills and 
the acquisition of analytical skills for examining and solving 
problems. The degree is typically pursued by those students 
whose academic emphasis in their major area of study is 
directed towards the natural sciences, mathematics, statistics, 
or a technological field. 

Statement of Requirements for the Bachelor of 
Science (B.S.) Degree: General Education requirements, 
general requirements for graduation, and increased knowl- 
edge of the natural sciences, mathematics, statistics, and/or 
technology. This knowledge is demonstrated by the success- 
ful completion of a three-hour course, beyond those required 
for General Education, selected from an approved list of 
courses that involve natural sciences, mathematics, statistics, 
and technology (SMT). 

Statement of Purpose for the Bachelor of Science in 
Education (B.S. in Ed.) Degree: The Bachelor of Science 
in Education degree encourages acquisition of communication 
skills, development of analytical skills for examining and 
solving problems, and the understanding of cultures with spe- 
cial emphasis on application to the art and science of teaching. 
The degree is typically pursued by students interested in the 
teaching profession. 

Statement of Requirements for the Bachelor of 
Science in Education (B.S. in Ed.) Degree: General 
Education requirements, general requirements for gradua- 
tion, and increased knowledge and skills related to profes- 
sional standards established by the National Council for the 
Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) through the 
successful completion of professional education require- 
ments and approved teacher education major requirements. 

Statement of Purpose for the Bachelor of Science 
in Nursing (B.S.N.) Degree: The Bachelor of Science in 
Nursing degree provides graduates with knowledge and 
skills in communication, critical thinking for analyzing 
and solving problems, and an understanding of the soci- 
etal changes that impact health care. Courses from the 



Academic Policies and Practices 



51 



humanities, psychology, physical and social sciences, as 
well as the use of technology, provide a foundation for 
scientific inquiry and application of nursing knowledge 
and theories to diverse populations and settings. 

Statement of Requirements for the Bachelor of 
Science in Nursing (B.S.N.) Degree: General Education 
requirements, general requirements for graduation, and 
nursing field of study requirements. 

Statement of Purpose for the Bachelor of Fine Arts 
(B.F.A.) Degree: The Bachelor of Fine Arts degree 
encourages the acquisition and display of talent in the arts, 
with special emphasis on aesthetic performance and under- 
standing. The degree is typically pursued by individuals 
interested in the creative and fine arts. 

Statement of Requirements for the Bachelor of Fine 
Arts (B.F.A.) Degree: General Education requirements, gen- 
eral requirements for graduation, and art field of study require- 
ments for B.F.A. degree. 

Statement of Purpose for the Bachelor of Music 
(B.M.) Degree: The Bachelor of Music degree encourages 
the acquisition and display of talent in music, with special 
emphasis on aesthetic performance and understanding. 
This degree is typically pursued by individuals interested in 
music performance. 

Statement of Requirements for the Bachelor of Music 
(B.M.) Degree: General Education requirements, general 
requirements for graduation and music field of study require- 
ments for B.M. degree. 

Statement of Purpose for the Bachelor of Music 
Education (B.M.E.) Degree: The Bachelor of Music 
Education degree encourages the acquisition and display of 
talent in music, with the special emphasis on teaching 
music. This degree is typically pursued by individuals 
interested in becoming music teachers. 



Statement of Requirements for the Bachelor of 
Music Education (B.M.E.) Degree: General Education 
requirements, general requirements for graduation, music 
field of study requirements for B.M.E. degree, and profes- 
sional education requirements. 

Statement of Purpose for the Bachelor of Social 
Work (B.S.W.) Degree: The B.S.W. encourages acquisition 
of communication skills, development of analytical skills for 
examining and solving problems; and the understanding of 
social, cultural, and legal structures with special emphasis on 
application to the profession of social work. The degree is 
pursued by all undergraduates in the School of Social Work 
and is recognized as the first professional degree in the field 
that prepares undergraduate students for beginning generalist 
social work practice. 

Statement of Requirements for the Bachelor of 
Social Work (B.S.W.) Degree: General Education require- 
ments, general requirements for graduation, and Social Work 
major requirements. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE GRADUATION 
REQUIREMENTS IN SCIENCE, 
MATHEMATICS AND TECHNOLOGY 

Students with a B.S. degree must have one additional 
science, mathematics, statistics, and/or technology course 
(beyond the General Education requirements) which must 
meet three criteria: (a) courses must be three semester hours 
or greater; (b) courses must list specific prerequisites from 
inner core courses in mathematics and/or science, approved 
natural science alternative courses, or middle core courses in 
the quantitative reasoning category; and (c) course content 
must be mathematical, scientific, and/or technological, and 
must constitute a significant extension of the inner or middle 
core courses that count as prerequisites. 



52 



Academic Policies and Practices 



The courses on the following list meet the graduation 
requirement for Science, Mathematics and Technology. 

AGR 157 Soil Science 

AGR 203 Agriculture and the Environment 

AGR 271 Foods of Animal Origin 

AGR 282 Physiology of Farm Animals 

AGR 3 1 5 Financial Management and Analysis of 

the Agribusiness Firm 
AGR 363 Agricultural Statistics 
BSC 145 Human Biology 
BSC 160 Microbiology and Society 
BSC 170 Genetics and Society 
BSC 201 Ecology 
BSC 202 Human Ecology 
BSC 211 Economic Botany 
BSC 219 Genetics 
BSC 222 Plant Diversity 
BSC 223 Ecology and Identification of Plants 
BSC 292 Invertebrate Zoology 
BSC 295 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy 
CHE 141 General Chemistry II 
CHE 204 Chemistry of Life 
CHE 220 Elementary Organic Chemistry 
CHE 230/231 Organic Chemistry I 
CHE 280 Environmental Chemistry 
ECO 138 Economic Reasoning Using Statistics 
ECO 238 Using Regression and Econometric Methods 
FIL 240 Business Finance 

GEO 138 Quantitative Reasoning in the Geosciences 
GEO 202 Evolution of the Earth 
GEO 207 Natural Disasters 
GEO 211 Earth's Dynamic Weather 
GEO 280 Mineralogy 
HSC 201 Pathophysiology I 
ITK 1 1 5 Reasoning About Complex Systems 
ITK 1 65 Computer Programming for Scientists 
KNR 282 Biomechanics of Human Movement 
MAT 121 Applied Calculus 
MAT 146 Calculus II 
MAT 147 Calculus III 
MAT 1 60 Elementary Discrete Mathematics 
MAT 1 75 Elementary Linear Algebra 
MQM 100 Statistical Reasoning 
MQM 227 Operations Management 
PHI 1 12 Language, Logic, and Mathematics 
PHY 109 College Physics II 
PHY 1 1 1 Physics for Science and Engineering II 
PHY 1 1 7 Numerical Reasoning in Nature and Technology 
PHY 205 Origin of the Universe 
PHY 206 Chaos and Complexity 
PHY 207 Energy and Society 

POL 138 Quantitative Reasoning in Political Science 
PSY138 Reasoning in Psychology Using Statistics 
PSY 340 Statistics for the Social Sciences 
SOC 275 Social Statistics 
TEC 1 1 1 Fundamentals of Power Technology 
TEC 143 Introduction to Electronics For Data 

Communication 
TEC 313 Quality Systems for Technology 



GLOBAL STUDIES GRADUATION 
REQUIREMENT 

Students must have completed at least one course in 
Global Studies (that is, cultures and traditions of Asia, the 
Middle East, Africa, Latin America, or Indigenous Peoples 
of the World), which must meet the following criteria: (a) 
the course focuses primarily upon facets of specific cultures 
from these regions or these cultures in general (a minimum 
of 75% of the course content must deal directly with the 
culrure(s) from these regions); (b) exploration of the cul- 
ture^) is developed in a comparative perspective which 
helps the student understand and appreciate differences 
between the culture(s) under consideration and cultures and 
traditions of America; and (c) the course includes exposure 
to primary writings and artifacts from the culture(s). 

The courses on the following list meet the graduation 
requirement for Global Studies. 

ANT 185 Cultures of the World* 

ANT 270 Cross Cultural Perspective of Women, Sex 

Roles, and Gender 
ANT 283 North American Archaeology 
ART 140 Introduction to the Arts of the 

Americas, Africa, and the South Pacific 
ART 275 World Arts: Visual Arts* 
CJS 369 World Criminal Justice Systems 
ENG/LAN 206 Cultural Expressions in Social Contexts: Women 

of Asia, Latin America and Africa* 
GEO 135 World Geography* 
GEO 140 Human Geography 
GEO 235 Geography of Emerging Areas* 
HIS 104 History of Asia, Middle East, Africa, 

Latin America, or Indigenous Peoples* 
HIS 263 Modern Mexico 
HIS 265 African Civilization 
HIS 266 Modern Africa 
HIS 275 History of Japanese Civilization 
IDS 203 Nations and Narrations* 
LAN 244. 1 5 Cultura Hispanoamericana 
MUS 153 Black Music I* 
MUS 154 Black Music II* 
MUS 275 World Arts: Music* 
PHI 207 Indian Philosophy 
PHI 208 Buddhist Philosophy 
POL 140 Introduction to the Politics of Africa, Asia, and 

Latin America* 
POL 151 Introduction to International Relations 
POL 240 Latin American Politics 
POL 245 Asian Politics 
POL 246 African Politics 
POL 247 Middle Eastern Politics 
POL 345 Topics in Asian Politics 
POL 349 Topics in Middle East Politics 
THE 275.01 World Arts: Theatre* 
THE 275.02 World Arts: Film* 

*Global Studies courses approved for Outer Core. 



GRADUATION PROCEDURES 

Application for Graduation: During the early part of 
his or her senior year, the student must submit an 
Undergraduate Application for Graduation to Student 
Accounts, Campus Box 1210, Normal, IL., downloaded from 
the following website address: IllinoisState.edu/icampus. Each 
student should apply for graduation on or before the date spec- 
ified in the Office of the University Registrar Calendar found 
at www.registrar.ilstu.edu. The student pays a $25 graduation 
fee when applying for graduation, unless the fee is covered by 
an approved scholarship. 

Academic Progress Summary: The Academic 
Progress Summary (APS) is an assessment of the under- 
graduate student's academic progress toward completion 
of requirements for the bachelor's degree. This summary 
may be requested by the student with a photo I.D. at the 
University Registrar Service Center, 107 Moulton Hall, 
Campus Box 2202 or by viewing Progress Towards My 
Degree on iCampus. 

For those programs requiring special audit considera- 
tions, a senior evaluation will be prepared after the student 
has submitted the Undergraduate Application for Graduation. 

To determine specific program requirements (in addi- 
tion to the general requirements for graduation stated 
above), students should consult the following sections of 
the Undergraduate Catalog: (1) the General Education 
requirements; (2) the specific requirements for the major 
and minor fields of study; and, if the student seeks teacher 
certification, (3) the University-wide Teacher Education 
program requirements in the Undergraduate Catalog. 

Double Majors: Students completing requirements 
for two majors concurrently are eligible to receive only 
one degree. The degree awarded is based on the degree 
corresponding to the primary major. One diploma is 
issued to the student upon completion of both majors and 
all other degree requirements. 

Commencement: Degrees are conferred and diplo- 
mas awarded after the close of each semester and the 
summer session. Commencement exercises are held in 
December and May at the end of the semester. 
Undergraduate students completing degree requirements 
during the fall semester participate in Commencement 
exercises in December; students completing degree 
requirements during the spring semester or at the close of 
the summer session following May Commencement may 
participate in Commencement exercises in May. 
Undergraduate students who are eligible to graduate and 
want to walk across the stage in their commencement 
ceremony must check YES on the Undergraduate 
Application for Graduation and submit it by the pub- 
lished deadline. An application must be on file and the 
graduation fee paid by the deadline to participate in the 
commencement ceremony. Note: Students participating 
in Commencement will walk with the college in which 
their primary major resides. 



Academic Policies and Practices 53 

For more information regarding Commence- 
ment, please visit the Commencement Website at 
www.commencement.ilstu.edu. 

Degrees with Honor Distinction: A student must have 
completed at least 50 semester hours at Illinois State 
University to be eligible for a degree with honor distinc- 
tion. Students who have an accumulated GPA of 3.90 
through 4.00 are graduated summa cum laude; those with a 
GPA of 3.80 through 3.89 are graduated magna cum laude; 
and those with a GPA of 3.65 through 3.79 are graduated 
cum laude. Diploma and transcript notations of graduation 
with cum laude, magna cum laude, and summa cum laude 
honors are based on the cumulative GPA after the student's 
final graded semester. 

Honor Distinction at Commencement: In order to be 
recognized with an academic honor (summa, magna, cum 
laude) distinction at Commencement, students must have 
completed at least 50 semester hours at Illinois State 
University and have a qualifying GPA (refer to Degrees with 
Honor Distinction), both based on the semester prior to 
Commencement. For example, students graduating in May or 
August must have both hours and GPA completed in the pre- 
vious fall semester. Students meeting these requirements wear 
an honor cord as part of their academic regalia at 
Commencement, and their names will appear in the 
Commencement program with the honor denoted. Diploma 
and transcript notations of graduation with cum laude, magna 
cum laude, and summa cum laude honors are based on the 
cumulative GPA after the student's final graded semester. 

Honors Program Designation at Commencement: 

The following Honors Program designations are recog- 
nized in the Commencement program: Honors Program 
Scholar, Presidential Scholar, Honors Program Scholar 
with Distinction, and Departmental Honors. 

Students are recognized for these awards in the 
Commencement program if they fulfill individual desig- 
nation requirements; the cumulative GPA from the semes- 
ter prior to graduation is used to evaluate eligibility for 
the designations as well as course and hour requirements 
that have been completed or are in progress. Students 
graduating in May or August who participate in May 
Commencement are evaluated based on the cumulative 
GPA at the end of the previous fall semester; students 
graduating in December who participate in the December 
Commencement are evaluated based on the cumulative 
GPA at the end of the previous summer session. 

Transcript and diploma (as applicable) notations of 
these designations are based on the cumulative GPA after 
the student's final semester and the successful completion 
of designation requirements. 

Students who have been awarded the Robert G. Bone 
Scholarship are also recognized in the Commence- 
ment program. 

Diplomas: Diplomas are issued to students after com- 
pletion of all degree requirements, including major(s), 
minor(s), general education, professional education, if 



54 



Academic Policies and Practices 



applicable, and other specific degree requirements. Students 
completing requirements for two majors concurrently are eli- 
gible to receive only one degree. The degree awarded is 
based on the degree corresponding to the primary major. 
One diploma is issued to the student upon completion of 
both majors and all other degree requirements. Majors are 
not printed on the diploma; however, all majors and minors 
are printed on the official transcript. 



General Academic Policies 

COURSE REGISTRATION AND WITHDRAWAL 

Course Registration: Students at Illinois State 
University register through the iCampus Portal at 
www.icampus.ilstu.edu. Help with registration may be 
obtained at the University Registrar Service Center, 107 
Moulton Hall, or by calling (309) 438-2188. For office 
hours visit the Website at www.registrar.ilstu.edu. 

A student at Illinois State University is responsible for 
following registration procedures to assure valid registration 
for courses. Work taken in a given session must be regis- 
tered for in that session. A student may not attend a class for 
which they are not properly registered. A correct registration 
is each student's individual responsibility. The University 
reserves the right to void the registration of any student who 
becomes ineligible for enrollment. 

Registration may be accomplished during the advance 
registration period or the additional registration periods 
prior to the start of the semester. New freshman may regis- 
ter during the summer Preview Program and new transfer 
students may register during the Transfer Days Program. 
Students are encouraged to register during these programs 
because of the wider selection of courses open to them at 
that time. They may also register just before the opening of 
the semester. For advance registration, the date and time of 
registration will be available on the iCampus Portal approxi- 
mately one week prior to advance registration. 

Course Registration Changes: A student who is already 
registered for a particular semester and desires to change his or 
her schedule before the deadline for doing so should follow the 
instructions available on the Registrar's Website at www.regis- 
trar.ilsru.edu. 

Withdrawal Policy — Dropping a Course or 
Courses: Students are strongly advised to complete all 
courses in which they enroll and are encouraged to avoid 
withdrawing from any course after the program change 
period unless absolutely necessary. 

The following policy applies to students who drop a 
course or courses but maintain an enrolled status within 
the University: A student may withdraw from a course 
during the program change period without the withdrawal 
being shown on the transcript. (A student should consult 
the Registrar's website at www.registrar.ilstu.edu to 
obtain specific dates.) 



After the tenth day of classes, but prior to the end of the 
eighth week of classes during any regular semester, a student 
with photo identification may withdraw from a full semester 
course by reporting to the the University Registrar Service 
Center, 107 Moulton Hall. Course withdrawal deadline 
information can be found on the Registrar's website at 
www.registrar.ilstu.edu. 

A student should consult the University Registrar 
Service Center for questions regarding refunds and for 
specific withdrawal dates during any instructional term. 
For courses taken during a term lasting less than a regular 
semester, a proportional withdrawal period will apply. 

A grade of F will be given to students who (1) fail to 
withdraw officially from a course in compliance with the 
above procedure, or (2) register for a course but do not com- 
plete course requirements. 

Upon the written recommendation of a licensed physi- 
cian or clinical psychologist, or in other unusual circum- 
stances, a student may be granted permission to withdraw 
officially from a course for medical, psychological, or 
other similar reasons after the official withdrawal period 
upon receiving approval from the University Registrar, or 
his designee. If approval is granted, a grade of WX will be 
awarded. 

Withdrawal Policy — Dropping All Courses: The fol- 
lowing policy applies when a student drops all courses in 
which he or she is enrolled, which is known as withdrawal 
from the University. Students are strongly advised to com- 
plete courses in which they are enrolled and not to withdraw 
from the University unless absolutely necessary. 

Before the end of the twelfth week of classes during 
any regular semester, a student reports to the University 
Registrar Service Center in 107 Moulton Hall or writes to 
the Office of the University Registrar at Campus Box 2202 
to withdraw from the University. 

If a student's written request to withdraw from the 
University is granted, all grades will be assigned in the 
same manner and under the same provisions as the regu- 
lar course withdrawal guidelines. The instructor of each 
course assigns a WX or letter grade as appropriate 
depending on the date and circumstances of withdrawal. 
If medical or other reasons make it impossible for the stu- 
dent to follow the usual procedures, a letter requesting 
withdrawal that explains the situation, with appropriate 
documentation and the student's signature, will be suffi- 
cient. Withdrawals made by mail are addressed to Office 
of the University Registrar, Illinois State University, 
Campus Box 2202, Normal, IL 61790-2202, or by fax to 
(309) 438-8652. 

Regardless of the circumstances of withdrawal, the 
student is responsible for returning any laboratory equip- 
ment and library materials and paying for any parking 
fines. The student must contact the University Housing 
Services to obtain clearance from room and board obliga- 
tions and to arrange for vacating the residence hall room. 
The student should arrange with the Financial Aid Office 



Academic Policies and Practices 



55 



to place any scholarship on leave or cancel it and make 
arrangements for future financial assistance. 
Arrangements for payment of loans must be made in the 
Office of Student Accounts. Consult the Office of Student 
Accounts for information on refunds. 

A grade of F will be given to students who ( 1 ) do not 
attend their courses but fail to withdraw from the 
University before the specified final withdrawal date, and 
to students who (2) register for a course but do not com- 
plete course requirements. In unusual cases, exceptions 
may be granted by the University Registrar. 

Repetition of Course(s) Requirements: If a student 
completes a course, or drops a course after the tenth day of 
classes receiving a grade of WX, he or she may repeat that 
course once. For students receiving a letter grade of B, C, D, 
or F, the course repetition must occur at Illinois State 
University and may not be taken under the credit/no credit 
(pass/fail) option. 

Students seeking to repeat a course a second time (a 
third enrollment) must obtain permission from their academ- 
ic advisor who will submit a substitution waiver form to the 
University Registrar for final approval. When a course has 
been repeated at Illinois State University, the most recent 
grade (A, B, C, D, F) that the student earns will replace the 
previous grade in the cumulative GPA calculation. A grade 
of WX will not replace the previous grade. 

The previous grade(s) will not be removed from the stu- 
dent's transcript, and the credit hours from only the last 
attempt can be used toward meeting minimum hourly 
requirements. Students repeating a course to improve their 
GPA should be aware that many professional and graduate 
schools recalculate GPAs to include all courses attempted. 

Cross-listed Course Policy: Cross-listed courses are 
offered by more than one department or school, but treat- 
ed as one course for credit purposes. A cross-listed course 
will be considered as one course regardless of the depart- 
ment or school through which the student registered for 
the course. This is a general rule that applies to all cross- 
listed courses taken for any purpose. 

Course Load Requirements: A full-time undergrad- 
uate student carries between 12 and 17 hours. For enroll- 
ment verification purposes, 12 hours is considered 
full-time for undergraduate students. A student wishing to 
carry more than 17 hours in a semester may seek permis- 
sion to do so from the chairperson or director of his or her 
major department or school (or their designees). The 
granting of this permission will depend on the student's 
scholastic record. A freshman may not carry over 17 
hours during his or her first semester. 

A student considering enrolling in any classes, includ- 
ing extension or correspondence, at another college or uni- 
versity with concurrent registration at Illinois State 
University should consult with his or her advisor. 

Summer Academic Opportunities: The University 
is operated on the semester plan and provides, in addition 



to its fall and spring semesters, a summer session with 
courses of varying lengths, and a variety of short-term 
offerings. Courses are also offered off campus. Limited 
student teaching and internship positions are available 
during the summer session. Prospective students may 
obtain information on summer course availability, and 
other information for the session at the Registrar's web- 
site. Summer session students should refer to the 
Undergraduate Catalog and Graduate Catalog for acade- 
mic requirements. Admission to the University can be 
arranged on a summer only basis. Further information can 
be obtained by writing to the Office of Admissions, 
Illinois State University, Campus Box 2200, Normal, IL 
61790-2200, or by calling (800) 366-2478. 

Evening and Off-Campus Classes: In addition to 
courses offered during the regular school day, evening and 
weekend classes are scheduled both on campus and off cam- 
pus. For courses offered by Illinois State University, no dif- 
ferentiation is made between credits earned on campus and 
off campus. Inquiries concerning off-campus classes should 
be directed to the Office of the Provost, (309) 438-7018. 
Non-credit workshops, seminars, and conferences are sched- 
uled by the Illinois State Conferencing Unit, (309) 438-2160. 

FINAL EXAMINATIONS 

Students who have no more than two final examinations 
on the same day will be expected to take these examinations 
as scheduled. A student concerned about having more than 
two examinations scheduled for the same day should address 
this concern prior to finals week: (1) The student brings a 
photo ID to the University Registrar Service Center, 
Moulton Hall 107, to request a form verifying that more than 
two finals are scheduled on the same day, and (2) the student 
then shares this form with the instructor when requesting an 
exam be moved to a different date. 

Students who are unable to take an examination due to 
emergencies such as illness or injury, or religious reasons 
should notify their instructor as soon as possible (in advance, 
in the case of religious reasons) and make acceptable alter- 
native arrangements. If an instructor does not consider an 
excuse for missing a scheduled examination for the student, 
the student may appeal the action to the department chair. 

UNIVERSITY GRADING SYSTEM 

Course Grades: Instructors assign a grade in each 
course for which the student is registered. The course 
instructor is responsible for correcting any error in grading. 

The grade point equivalents are 4 for A, 3 for B, 2 for 
C, 1 for D, and for all other grades. The value of F as 
well as WF is computed in the student's grade point aver- 
age (GPA). The value of grades I, AU, CR, CT, NC, and 
WX is not computed in the student's GPA. University 
grades assigned undergraduate courses are: 

A Excellent 

B Good 

C Satisfactory 



56 



Academic Policies and Practices 



D Poor, But Passing 

F Failing — Assigned to students who are (1) enrolled in a 
course all semester but fail to earn a passing grade, or 
who (2) stop attending a class without officially with- 
drawing 

WX Withdrawal — Assigned to students who officially 
withdraw from a course before the quality of work can 
be determined and before the dates specified in the 
withdrawal policy 

I Incomplete 

AU Audit 

CR Credit — Assigned to students who do satisfactory work 

in a course which is offered on a Credit/No Credit 

basis only 
CT Credit — Assigned to students who earn an A, B, or C 

grade in a course which they have elected to take under 

the Credit/No Credit (CT/NC) option 

NC No Credit — Assigned to students who (1) do not do 
satisfactory work in a course which is offered on a 
Credit/No Credit (CR/NC) basis only and to students 
(2) who do not earn an A, B, or C grade in a course 
that they have elected to take under the Credit/No 
Credit (CT/NC) option 

Incomplete: An incomplete (I) will be assigned to a stu- 
dent who is doing passing work but finds it impossible, 
because of reasons beyond her or his control (such as ill- 
ness), to complete the required work by the end of the term. 
The student must have attended class to within three weeks 
of the close of the semester or to within one week of the 
close of the summer session. 

The instructor may specify the time by which the 
required work must be completed, which may be no later 
than the final class day of the corresponding term of the fol- 
lowing academic year. For graduating students, an incom- 
plete grade must be removed at least six weeks before 
December or May commencement or two weeks before 
August graduation. Students will not be allowed to gradu- 
ate with Incompletes on their record. 

When the Incomplete is assigned, the student, faculty 
member, and the department chairperson or school director 
must sign an Incomplete Permit form. The form will specify 
the date by which the work must be completed, the default 
grade (A, B, C, D, or F) that will be assigned if the work is 
not completed by the specified date, and the nature of the 
required work. If the instructor fails to file the appropriate 
grade change by the specified date, the Incomplete will lapse 
to the default grade specified. Exceptions to this policy may 
be granted by the University Registrar. 

Auditors: An auditor does not participate in the activity 
of the class but is expected to attend regularly. A student 
may register as an auditor in a class or classes if space is 
available. An Audit (AU) designation will appear on the stu- 
dent's transcript when the instructor certifies that the student 
has attended the class on a regular basis. If the student has 
not attended regularly, a WX will be recorded on the tran- 



script after the instructor has notified the Registrar's Office 
in writing that the student has not attended regularly. To 
audit, a student must obtain a Request for Auditor 
Registration from the University Registrar Service Center 
or download it at www.registrar.ilstu.edu/forms, have the 
instructor sign it and present the form at the University 
Registrar Service Center. Students must register to audit a 
course by the tenth day of classes in the semester, with 
any exception having the approval of the chairperson of 
the department or director of the school in which the 
course is offered and the University Registrar. There is a 
fee for auditing. Audited courses are considered part of 
the student's total load. 

Credit/No Credit Courses: Certain courses in the 
University are offered on a Credit/No Credit (CR/NC) 
basis only. For these courses, students receive a grade of 
CR (Credit) or NC (No Credit). The offering of a particular 
course on a CR/NC basis only must be approved in 
advance by the Office of the Provost. 

Credit/No Credit Student Option (commonly called 
Pass/Fail): An undergraduate student (except a first-semes- 
ter freshman) who is not on academic probation may choose 
to register in some courses under the option that allows the 
student to be graded on the basis of CT (Credit) or NC (No 
Credit) rather than on the basis of A, B, C, D, or F grades. 

This CT/NC option is designed to encourage students to 
enroll in courses they otherwise would not take. Some cours- 
es, therefore, including those in a student's major or minor, 
may not be taken on the CT/NC option. Exceptions include 
courses in the student's major or minor field that are offered 
only as credit/no credit (CR/NC) courses. No more than six 
semester hours of work under the CT/NC option may be 
taken each semester, with a maximum of 25 semester hours 
under the CT/NC option presented for graduation. Although 
an entry of CT (credit earned under the option) or NC (no 
credit earned under the option) will be entered on the stu- 
dent's record, these entries are not used in computing the 
student's GPA. 

No Inner Core or Middle Core course in the General 
Education Program may be taken under the CT/NC option. 

Students who plan to enter graduate or professional 
schools should exercise caution in taking courses under 
the CT/NC option because courses completed on a pass- 
fail basis may adversely affect graduate admission oppor- 
tunities. Such students should consult their academic 
advisor prior to taking courses on a pass/fail basis. 

A grade of CT is recorded when the grade submitted by 
the instructor is A, B, or C. A grade of NC is recorded when 
the grade submitted by the instructor is D or F. 

Students electing the CT/NC option should do so as 
part of the regular registration process. Students may not 
elect the option after the tenth day of classes in the 
semester. Students who have elected the CT/NC option 
may return to the letter basis of grading before the last 
date for withdrawing from a course, as specified on the 
Registrar's Website at www.registrar.ilstu.edu. 



Academic Policies and Practices 



57 



Grade Point Average: To be eligible for graduation, a 
student must have a minimum grade point average (GPA) 
of 2.00 (C) in all courses taken at Illinois State University 
for which grades of A, B, C, D, F, or WF are assigned. 
Failures are considered in the total number of semester 
hours taken in computing the GPA. The table below illus- 
trates how grade points are counted to determine the GPA. 



For GPA Points 



Grade 




Sem. Hrs. Sem 


Course 


Grade 


Enrolled Earr 


POL 105 


D 


3 3 


BSC 145 


CT 


2 2 


COM 110 


A 


3 3 


MUS 139 


I 


1 


CHE 102 


B 


3 3 


KNR133 


WX 


1 


IDS 106 


NC 


1 


Totals 




14 11 



3 


3 








3 


12 








3 


9 














9 


24 



The GPA is computed by dividing grade points earned 
by semester hours counted for GPA. In the case above, a 
GPA of 2.66 is calculated by dividing 24 (total grade 
points) by 9 (semester hours for GPA). Grades of WX, 
WP, CT, CR, I, and NC do not affect the GPA. 

Academic Progress Alert: The Academic Progress 
Alert is an assessment of the undergraduate student's per- 
formance in each full-semester, 100-level course in which 
the student is enrolled. This assessment is available 
through the iCampus Portal at IllinoisState.edu/icampus at 
the end of the first half of the semester. 

ADDITIONAL ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS 

Class Attendance: The attendance regulation of the 
University is based on two principles. First, students are 
expected to attend class regularly; and second, students are 
primarily responsible to the instructor in matters pertaining 
to class attendance. Every student will be held responsible 
for class attendance and successful completion of academic 
work. Attendance regulations are intended to encourage stu- 
dent maturity and are based on the assumption that academic 
success is the student's primary goal in college. 

Illinois State University deeply values and supports the 
required participation of students in Sanctioned University 
Activities. Instructors will provide such students with rea- 
sonable accommodations for completing missed exams, 
quizzes, and the like. The Office of the Vice President of 
Student Affairs will determine Sanctioned University 
Activities. It is the responsibility of the student to ( 1 ) inform 
instructors of scheduled absences in advance, (2) where pos- 
sible and as soon as possible, provide a schedule of all 
semester absences, and (3) arrange to complete missed class- 
room work. Ultimately, students are responsible for material 
covered in class. In the event of disagreement regarding this 
policy, the issue will be directed to the appropriate Associate 
Vice President for Academic Affairs for arbitration. 

The University will accommodate, within reason, stu- 
dents whose religious obligations require absence from class. 



Students who are unable to attend class or take examinations 
for religious reasons should consult their instructors in 
advance about alternative arrangements. 

Class Standing: Students in a bachelor's degree pro- 
gram are classified as freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and 
seniors. A student must have completed 30 semester hours 
to be classified as a sophomore, 60 hours to be classified as 
a junior, and 90 hours to be classified as a senior. Students 
not working toward a degree at Illinois State are listed as 
Unclassified Students. 

75 Hour Limit on Undeclared Student Status: Illinois 
State University requires all students to have a declared 
major upon completion of 75 hours of college-level course- 
work, including transfer credit. At 75 hours earned, students 
who are undeclared will have their next semester's schedule 
dropped unless they successfully complete an appeal process 
through the Office of Enrollment Management and 
Academic Services. To be eligible for financial aid and in 
order to be consistent with federal financial aid guidelines, 
Illinois State students with 75 hours or more must be 
enrolled in a major program leading to a degree. For further 
information on this policy and on finding and declaring a 
major, see FindYourMajor.IllinoisState.edu. 

Major Field(s) of Study: Students may select a major 
field of study at the time of admission unless the field they 
choose has special admissions standards. Students who are 
undeclared majors are encouraged to select a major field of 
study as soon as possible. The major and minor fields of 
study available at Illinois State are described later in this cata- 
log. A student may complete the requirements for two 
majors, both of which will be identified on the student's tran- 
script provided all requirements are completed in both majors 
and the degree is awarded. When a student double majors, the 
student indicates only one major for purposes of registration. 
Unless otherwise specified in a particular program, students 
may use a specific course to meet requirements for a major 
and a second major. Note: Students completing requirements 
for two majors are eligible to receive one degree. The degree 
awarded is based on the degree for the primary major. One 
diploma is issued to the student upon completion of both 
majors and all other degree requirements. 

Change of Primary or Secondary Major: A student 
wishing to enter a second major or change majors must 
consult the chairperson of the department or director of 
the school (or their designees) offering the major. 

Program Specific Admission Criteria: Illinois State 
University regulates admission to designated programs when 
the number of students seeking admission exceeds the avail- 
able educational resources of the department or school. 
Supplementary selection criteria for admission may need 
to be met for specific majors. These criteria may be based on 
scholastic achievement, prerequisite course work and/ 
or may consist of auditions, portfolios, work experience, 
etc. Selection criteria can be obtained from 
FindYourMajor.IllinoisState.edu, the Office of Admissions 
(for new students) or the intended major department or 
school advisor. 



58 



Academic Policies and Practices 



Dismissal from Major: A student who is academi- 
cally dismissed from the University will be dropped auto- 
matically from his or her major. The student dropped 
from the major will be classified as undeclared and will 
receive academic advisement from the University College 
Academic Advisement Center. In order to declare a major in 
a department or school after being dropped, the student must 
be accepted by the department or school in which he or she 
desires to be a major. 

Minor Field(s) of Study: Students often elect a 
minor field of study. A student may elect to complete the 
requirements for two minors, both of which will be iden- 
tified on the student's transcript upon receipt of degree. A 
student wishing to enter a minor, second minor or change 
minors consults with the academic department(s) offering 
the minor. Unless otherwise specified in a particular pro- 
gram, students may use a specific course to meet require- 
ments for a minor and a second minor. 

Certification Programs: Students who fail to maintain 
the specific grade point average required by their teaching 
or other certification program may be dismissed from that 
program. At the option of the department or school, stu- 
dents dropped from the program may pursue a degree in 
their major or be classified as undeclared and will receive 
academic advisement from University College Academic 
Advisement. To become a candidate for a certification pro- 
gram after being dropped, students must be accepted by the 
department or school in which they desire to pursue a certi- 
fication program. 

Academic Good Standing: To maintain academic 
good standing, a student must achieve a minimum cumu- 
lative GPA of 2.00. The number of semester hours com- 
pleted includes all college work done by the student. 
However, only the grades earned at Illinois State are used 
in computing the GPA. 

"Academic Good Standing" status is necessary for 
continued enrollment in the University and may be nec- 
essary for eligibility to serve on various University com- 
mittees and for participation in some co-curricular 
activities. Academic Good Standing status does not guar- 
antee admission to, or retention in, specific departments, 
schools, or programs. Information concerning admission 
to and retention in specific programs is listed in this 
Undergraduate Catalog under the appropriate depart- 
ment, school or program descriptions. 

For satisfactory progress for financial aid purposes, 
see Satisfactory Progress Policy in this catalog. 

Academic Warning: Each semester (fall and 
spring), the University identifies students that appear 
to be in jeopardy of being placed on academic probation. 
These students will be notified that they are on Academic 
Warning. Students on Academic Warning can contact the 
Julia N. Visor Academic Center for guidance on pro- 
grams and services geared toward improving their acade- 
mic standing. Information about Academic Warning can 
be obtained from Julia N. Visor Academic Center, 



12 Vrooman Center, Campus Box 4070, at 
EMAS.IllinoisState.edu, or at (309) 438-7100. 

Academic Probation: When a student's cumulative 
grade point average falls below a 2.00 on a 4.00 scale, 
they are placed on academic probation. Students on acad- 
emic probation are required to participate in Project 
Success - a program designed to assist students in return- 
ing to good academic standing. Information about 
Academic Probation and Project Success can be obtained 
from the Julia N. Visor Academic Center, 12 Vrooman 
Center, Campus Box 4070, at EMAS.IllinoisState.edu, or 
at (309) 438-7100. 

Academic Dismissal: At the end of any semester, 
except for summer session, when a student's cumulative 
grade point average is below a 2.00 a second or subsequent 
time, he or she is dismissed from the University. 

Academic Reinstatement: Students dismissed from 
the University may petition the Reinstatement Committee 
for permission to continue. Petitions must be received by 
the appropriate deadlines to be considered. Additionally, 
students can access petition information via the iCampus 
Portal at IllinoisState.edu/icampus or by visiting the 
Office of Enrollment Management and Academic 
Services Website at EMAS.IllinoisState.edu. Students 
who are reinstated and elect to postpone their enrollment 
for a future term must reapply for that term. 

Only students who have extenuating circumstances or 
errors in their academic records should plan to petition for 
reinstatement for the semester following their dismissal. 

Former Illinois State Students Seeking Reinstatement 
After Dismissal: Students wishing to return to Illinois State 
after being away for one or more semesters must (1) meet 
university- wide readmission requirements and deadlines; and 
(2) be reinstated by the University Reinstatement Committee. 
Application procedures, reinstatement information and dead- 
lines can be found at the Office of Admissions Website at 
IllinoisState.edu/admissions. Students who are reinstated and 
elect to postpone their enrollment for a future term must 
reapply for that term. Reinstated students are required to par- 
ticipate in Project Success - a program designed to assist stu- 
dents in returning to Academic Good Standing. 

If a student attends any other higher educational institu- 
tion after dismissal from Illinois State, he or she must indi- 
cate such attendance on the readmission application and 
supply an official transcript from the other school(s). 
Students must have earned a C average (2.00/4.00) or higher 
for all course work taken since last attending Illinois State 
and have been in good academic standing at the last institu- 
tion attended as a full- or part-time student. 

Repeated failures to do satisfactory work may result in 
permanent exclusion from the University. 

New Start Policy: Students who leave Illinois State in a 
degree program with less than a 2.00 cumulative grade-point 
average (GPA) may be considered for readmission through 
the New Start Policy. Applicants admitted through this poli- 



cy will begin with a new cumulative GPA calculated from 
the point of their reentry. 

Students may be considered for readmission through the 
New Start Policy after being away from the University for 
one full year (Example: A student who last attended the 
University the Fall 2009 term cannot reenroll through the 
New Start Policy until the Spring 201 1 term.) and only when 
the requirements of one of the following New Start cate- 
gories are met: 

1. Non-Traditional Student Option: Former Illinois 
State students at least 25 years of age may be consid- 
ered for readmission through this option. If they have 
attended any college (including Illinois State) in the 
three calendar years preceding re-enrollment at 
Illinois State, they must have achieved at least a 2.50 
GPA for that college work. Transfer credit will be 
evaluated and appropriately awarded. 

2. Veterans' Option: Students who complete at least a 
one-year tour of duty and present a discharge for rea- 
sons other than dishonorable, and whose first atten- 
dance at a college or university after discharge is at 
Illinois State, may be considered for readmission 
through this option. 

3. Community College Transfer Option: Former Illinois 
State students who earned 60 or fewer hours at Illinois 
State prior to enrolling at a community college and 
who subsequently earn at least 24 hours after being 
away for one full year and earn a currently accepted 
associate degree (A.A. or A.S.) from a community col- 
lege with at least a 2.50 GPA may be considered for 
readmission through this option. Transfer credit will be 
evaluated and appropriately awarded. 

The application process includes the submission of the 
application for admission, official academic transcripts from 
all schools attended since leaving Illinois State, and a state- 
ment describing your potential to do well academically as 
described on the application. In some cases, additional sup- 
porting documents may be requested from the University in 
order to complete your application. NOTE: Meeting the 
minimum requirements does not guarantee re-admission. 
Students are strongly encouraged to file an application as 
soon as possible during the priority-filing period for the term 
for which they are applying. Application deadlines are post- 
ed on the Admissions Website at IllinoisState.edu/admis- 
sions and on the application for admission. 

Students may exercise the New Start Option only once. 
Such students will have "New Start" indicated on their 
transcript. New Start will affect only the cumulative GPA. 
All grades earned at Illinois State, regardless of when 
earned, will be used in the calculation of the major GPA, 
the minor GPA, and graduation honors. Students who are 
admitted through the New Start Policy will be admitted on 
academic probation. Students who reenter under the New 
Start Policy must follow the Undergraduate Catalog in 
effect at the time of reentry. To be eligible for graduation, a 
student must earn at least 30 semester hours at Illinois State 
University after exercising New Start. 



Academic Policies and Practices 
ADMINISTRATIVE WITHDRAWAL 



59 



In the rare event that a student exhibits serious psycho- 
logical/medical problems that rise to the level of a direct 
threat (high probability of substantial harm to self, others, or 
property), the University will make an individualized and 
objective assessment of the student's ability to safely partici- 
pate in University classes and activities and/or to reside in 
University housing. In such instances, the University 
reserves the right to take such actions as may be required 
including asking a student to withdraw or administratively 
withdraw a student from the University community. A stu- 
dent may also be restricted from University property and/or 
participation in University activities as a condition of the 
administrative withdrawal. 

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY 

Students are expected to be honest in all academic work. 
A student's name on any academic exercise (theme, report, 
notebook, paper, examination) shall be regarded as assur- 
ance that the work is the result of the student's own thought 
and study. Offenses involving academic dishonesty include, 
but are not limited to the following: 

a. Cheating on quizzes or examinations occurs when any 
student is found using or attempting to use any book, 
paper, or other article, or assistance from any individual 
intending to deceive the person in charge of the quiz or 
examination with reference to his or her work. No books, 
notes, papers or related articles shall be used at any quiz 
or examination unless specifically authorized by the per- 
son in charge. Conversation or other communication 
between individuals in examinations and quizzes is for- 
bidden except as authorized by the instructor. 

b. Computer dishonesty is the unacknowledged or unau- 
thorized appropriation of another's program, or the 
results of that program, in whole or in part, for a com- 
puter-related exercise or assignment. 

c. Plagiarism is the unacknowledged appropriation of 
another's work, words, or ideas in any themes, out- 
lines, papers, reports, or computer programs. Students 
must ascertain from the instructor in each course the 
appropriate means of documentation. Submitting the 
same paper for more than one course is considered a 
breach of academic integrity unless prior approval is 
given by the instructors. 

d. Grade falsification is any attempt to falsify an assigned 
grade in an examination, quiz, report, program, grade 
book, or any other record or document. 

e. Collusion occurs when students willfully give or receive 
unauthorized or unacknowledged assistance on any 
assignment. This may include the reproduction and/or 
dissemination of test materials. Both parties to the collu- 
sion are considered responsible. No individual may sub- 
stitute for another in any quiz or examination. 

For more information consult the Community Rights 
and Responsibilities Website at: www.crr.ilstu.edu. 



Academic Policies and Practices 



PROFICIENCY AND PLACEMENT 
EXAMINATIONS 

Students at Illinois State University may receive cred- 
it by examination through the following programs: 
College Level Examination Program (CLEP) General 
Examinations, Departmental Proficiency Examinations, 
CLEP Subject Examinations, and the Advanced 
Placement program. Students and prospective students are 
advised to plan their course work and examination 
attempts carefully because they may not receive credit by 
examination for a course in which they have been 
enrolled on the tenth day of classes. 

CLEP General Examinations: Illinois State University 
grants credit by examination toward General Education 
requirements for the College Level Examination Program 
under the following guidelines: 

1. A student may receive credit for a maximum of 18 
semester hours credit through CLEP General 
Examinations. 

2. A student who desires to take the CLEP General 
Examinations should do so before enrolling for classes 
at the University. 

3. Credit earned through the CLEP General Examinations 
shall count toward General Education and graduation 
requirements only. A student may not use the CLEP 
General Examinations to raise grades or remove failures 
in courses already taken. All credit for CLEP General 
Examinations shall be considered credit at the 100-level. 

4. A student who is awarded credit in one or more areas of 
the General Examinations should consult with his or her 
advisor to select other appropriate basic and advanced 
courses. 

5. A student may not receive credit for both 
an area of the CLEP General Examinations and previous- 
ly earned course credit in the same area. For example, a 
student who earned course credit in the Fine Arts (Art, 
Music, Theatre) may not receive credit for a General 
Examination in the Fine Arts area. Also, credit will not 
be awarded for the General Examination areas in which 
credit is earned through Departmental Proficiency 
Examinations, Advanced Placement Examinations, or 
CLEP Subject Examinations. 

6. Students may take the CLEP General Examinations at 
Illinois State at times scheduled by the University 
Testing Office or at any CLEP Open Test Center. 
Students may contact the University Testing Office, 
346B Fell Hall, Campus Box 4060, (309) 438-2100, for 
further information. Students who take the CLEP exami- 
nations are responsible for the cost of the examination. 

7. FOR STUDENTS WHO HAVE TAKEN THE CLEP 
GENERAL EXAMINATIONS PRIOR TO JULY 1, 
2001. A student will be awarded 6 semester hours credit 
toward graduation and General Education requirements 
for a score of 570 on the Humanities, a score of 610 on 
the Natural Sciences, and a score of 550 on the Social 
Sciences and History general examinations passed. 
Credit will be awarded as follows: 



Humanities 

3 hours Fine Arts (Outer Core) 

and 3 hours Language in the Humanities (Middle Core) 

Natural Sciences* 

3 hours Biological Sciences (Inner Core) 

and 3 hours Physical Sciences (Inner Core) 



Social Sciences and History 

3 hours Individuals and Society 



and 3 hours 



U.S. Traditions 



(Middle Core) 
(Middle Core) 



*If CLEP credit is received in both Biological and 
Physical Sciences the General Education lab requirement 
will be waived. 

NOTE: Credit is not available for the English Composition 
or Mathematics General Examination. 

8. FOR STUDENTS WHO HAVE TAKEN THE CLEP 
GENERAL EXAMINATIONS JULY 1, 2001, OR 
AFTER. A student will be awarded 6 semester hours 
credit toward graduation and General Education require- 
ments for a score of 56 on the Humanities, a score of 65 
(56 after May 22, 2006) on the Natural Sciences, and a 
score of 56 on the Social Sciences and History general 
examinations passed. Credit will be awarded as follows: 

Humanities 

3 hours Fine Arts (Outer Core) 

and 3 hours Language in the Humanities (Middle Core) 

Natural Sciences* 

3 hours Biological Sciences (Inner Core) 

and 3 hours Physical Sciences (Inner Core) 

Social Sciences and History 

3 hours Individuals and Society (Middle Core) 

(Middle Core) 



and 3 hours U.S. Traditions 



*If CLEP credit is received in both Biological and 
Physical Sciences the General Education lab requirement 
will be waived. 

NOTE: Credit is not available for the English 
Composition or Mathematics General Examination. 

Students who have taken CLEP General Examinations 
at another institution may request that scores be submitted to 
Illinois State by contacting CLEP, P.O. Box 6600, Princeton, 
NJ 08541-6600 or telephone (609) 771-7865. 

CLEP Subject Examinations: In addition to the pre- 
viously described opportunities provided by the CLEP 
General Examinations, several departments or schools grant 
credit by examination in specific subject areas covered by 
CLEP Subject Examinations. Courses approved for credit 
under this program are HIS 101 and 102, MAT 145 and 146, 
POL 105 or 106 (includes U.S. Constitution only), PSY 111, 
and SOC 106. The University Testing Office, 346 Fell Hall, 
Campus Box 4060, (309) 438-2100 provides information 
about test dates and fees. 



Academic Policies and Practices 



61 



Departmental Proficiency Examinations: Depart-men- 
tal proficiency examinations are offered in most 100-level and 
in a limited number of 200-level courses. The purposes of the 
examinations are to allow students to receive credit for knowl- 
edge acquired previously and to allow students to enroll in 
more advanced courses or to add breadth to their academic 
programs. Proficiency examinations are optional and recom- 
mended only for students who are unusually skilled in the dis- 
cipline in which the examination is taken. Specific 
information about the nature of a given examination should be 
obtained directly from the appropriate departmental or school 
office. Below are University guidelines and procedures relat- 
ing to proficiency examinations: 

1 . The nature and content of each proficiency examination 
shall be determined by the department or school in 
which the course is offered. Standards of performance 
required for receiving credit in a given course also shall 
be determined by the department/school offering the 
course; the level and quality of work required for satis- 
factory performance on a proficiency examination is 
equivalent to that required for a grade of C in the course. 

2. Academic departments shall provide proficiency examina- 
tions in most 100-level courses that are regularly listed in 
the Undergraduate Catalog. Students will find a list 
of courses in which proficiency examinations are 
offered on the Office of University Registrar's website 
at www.registrar.ilstu.edu. 

3. A description of each proficiency examination should 
be available in the department or school offering the 
examination. Students should contact the appropriate 
department chairperson or school director for infor- 
mation about a specific examination, including qualify- 
ing experiences. 

4. All Illinois State University students are eligible to take 
proficiency examinations. 

5. Letter grades will not be assigned for proficiency 
examinations; therefore, the GPA will not be affected. 

6. Credit earned in proficiency examinations may not be 
used to raise grades or remove failures in courses in 
which a student has been enrolled previously. 

7. No course credit will be awarded for a proficiency 
examination which is at a lower level than a course pre- 
viously enrolled in or one that substantially duplicates 
the content of a course taken previously. 

8. Students may take a proficiency examination only 
once. 

9. Students may register for only one departmental profi- 
ciency examination each semester unless examinations 
are approved in writing by the chairs or directors of the 
departments/schools where the courses are being 
offered. 

10. Students with disabilities should notify the appropriate 
departmental office of the need for any special accom- 
modations prior to the date of the examination. 

1 1 . Students should register for an examination online at 
the Registrar's Website at www.registrar.ilstu.edu. 



Credit for Military Service: Students who have served 
at least one year of active duty and received an honorable 
discharge may receive six semester hours of elective credit. 
To qualify for this credit, a copy of the DD214 should be 
presented with the application for admission. 

Advanced Placement Program: The Advanced 
Placement Program is sponsored by the College Entrance 
Board. The examinations are administered at designated high 
school testing centers. Students will be awarded credit or 
exemption as indicated. 



Advanced Placement Program 






Score for 




Semester 




Credit or 


Course for which Hours 




Examination 


Exemption 


Credit is Allowed 


Awarded 


American Government 


5or4 


POL 105 U.S. 


3 hours 


01 


5 or 4 


POL 106 Gen Ed. 


3 hours 


U.S. History 


5, 4, or 3 


HIS 135, 136 


6 hours 


Art Studio-Drawing 


5, 4, or 3 


ART 104 


3 hours 


Art Studio-General 2D 


5, 4, or 3 


ART 103 


3 hours 


Design 








Art History 


5, 4, or 3 


ART 155, 156 


6 hours 


Biology 


5or4 


BSC 196 and 197 


8 hours 


Calculus Test AB 


5,4or3 


MAT 145 


4 hours 


Calculus Test BC 


5, 4, or 3 


MAT 145 and 146 


8 hours 


Chemistry 


5 


CHE 140, 141 


8 hours 




4 


CHE 140 


4 hours 


Government & Politics 


5or4 


POL 141 


3 hours 


Comparative 








Computer Science Test A 5 or 4 


ITK 168or 177 


4 hours 


Computer Science Test AB 5, 4 


ITK 168 or 177, 179 or 178 


7 hours 




3 


ITK 168 or 177 


4 hours 


English Lang-Comp 


5 


ENG 101, 145 


6 hours 




4 


ENG 101 


3 hours 


English Lit-Comp 


5,4 


ENG 125 


3 hours 


Environmental Science 


5, 4, or 3 


HSC 156 


3 hours 


European History 


5, 4, or 3 


HIS 101 and 102 


6 hours 


French Language 


5or4 


LAN French 112, 115 and 116 


12 hours 


French Language 


3 


LAN French 115 and 116 


8 hours 


French Literature 


5, 4, or 3 


LAN French 220 


3 hours 


German Language 


3 


LAN German 1 1 5 and 1 1 6 


8 hours 


German Language 


5or4 


LAN German 112, 115 and 116 12hours 


Human Geography 


5or4 


GEO 140 


3 hours 


Latin - Vergil 


5, 4, or 3 


LAN Latin 116 


4 hours 


Macro Economics and 








Micro Economics 


5or4 


ECO 105 


4 hours 


Music Listening and 








Literature 


5, 4, or 3 


MUS 152 


3 hours 


Music Theory: 








Aural Component 


5or4 


MUS 107 


1 hour 


Nonaural Component 


5or4 


MUS 101 


2 hours 


Physics Test B 


5, 4, or 3 


PHY 108 and 109 


10 hours 


Physics Test C, Part I-MECH5, 4, or 3 


PHY 110 


4 hours 


Physics Test C, Part D-E&M 5, 4, or 3 


PHY 1 1 1 


4 hours 


Psychology 


5or4 


PSY 110 


3 hours 


Spanish Language 


3 


LAN Spanish 115 and 116 


8 hours 


Spanish Language 


5or4 


LAN Spanish 1 12, 1 15 and 1 16 12 hours 


Spanish Literature 


5, 4, or 3 


LAN Spanish 233. 15 


3 hours 


Statistics 


5or4 


MQM 100 


3 hours 


World History 


5, 4, or 3 


HIS 101 


3 hours 



Academic Policies and Practices 



A student who has taken Advanced Placement Program 
examinations should request that his or her scores be sent to 
the University Registrar at Illinois State University. To 
request grade reports for Advanced Placement Examinations 
completed, a student should write to Advanced Placement 
Exams, Box 6671, Princeton, NJ 08541-6671. In making the 
request, the student should include name, sex, date of birth, 
the year in which the examination was taken, and the name 
and identification number of the college to which the grade 
report should be sent. Illinois State University's identifica- 
tion number is 1319. 

International Baccalaureate Diploma Program: 

Sponsored by the International Baccalaureate Organization, 
the program is designed to prepare students for success in 
the University and beyond in a variety of subjects. A student 
who has participated in the International Baccalaureate ® 
Diploma Programme should have his or her scores sent to 
the University Registrar at Illinois State University. For 
more information please see the International Baccalaureate 
® Organization website - http://www.ibo.org/ 

The International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma 
Program, offers high quality two year programs of study 
that lead to examinations. Assessments of the examinations 
are reported as a score via a diploma or individual subject 
certificates. Students with the appropriate scores will be 
awarded proficiency for specific International Baccalaureate 
Program work as indicated in the following chart. 



International Baccalaureate Diploma Program 


IB Examination 


Level 


Score 


Semester 
Hours 
Course (s) Awarded 


Classical Languages (Latin) S or H 


6,7 


LAN 115.14 4 


Language A2-Spanish 


SorH 


6,7 


LAN116.15or 3or4 
LAN 213.15 or 
LAN214.15 


Economics 


SorH 


6,7 


ECO 105 4 


Geography 


SorH 


5,6,7 


GEO 140 3 


History of Europe and 


SorH 


5,6,7 


HIS 101 or 104.04 3 


the Islamic World 








ITGS (International 


S 


5,6,7 


ITK214 3 


Technology in a Global 








Society) 








ITGS (International 


H 


5,6,7 


ITK 160 3 


Technology in a Global 








Society) 








Philosophy 


SorH 


5,6,7 


PHI 101 3 


Psychology 


S 


6,7 


PSY110 3 


Psychology 


H 


5,6,7 


PSY110 3 


Social and Cultural 


H 


4 


ANT 185 3 


Anthropology 








Social and Cultural 


H 


5,6 


ANT 186 or 281 3 


Anthropology 








Social and Cultural 


H 


7 


ANT 186 and 281 6 


Anthropology 








Biology 


H 


6,7 


BSC 196 and 197 8 


Chemistry 


H 


6,7 


CHE 110 4 


Physic 


SorH 


5,6,7 


PHY 105 4 


Computer Science 


S 


5,6,7 


ITK 168 or 177 4 


Computer Science 


H 


5,6,7 


ITK 178 and 254 6 


Mathematics 


H 


5,6,7 


MAT 145 4 


Further Mathematics 


H 


5,6,7 


MAT 145 and 146 8 


Music - Creating 


H 


4,5 


MUS 205.01 2 


Music - Perception 


SorH 


3,4,5 


MUS152 3 


Music - Solo Performing 


H 


4,5 


MUS 131-138 3 


(SLS) 




(assignment based on instrument type) 


Music - Group Performance Sor H 


4,5 


MUS 180-188 1 


(SLG) 




(assignment based on group type) 


S=Standard Level 








H=High Level 









63 



UNIVERSITY-WIDE PROGRAMS 



General Education 

General Education provides students with a broad, 
common foundation of study upon which to build an 
undergraduate education. The program develops skills of 
oral and written communication, logical and scientific rea- 
soning, computer usage, and quantitative analysis. Courses 
in General Education explore ways of knowing in the vari- 
ous disciplines through examination of significant histori- 
cal, social, cultural, and scientific issues. Students will 
take most General Education courses during their fresh- 
man and sophomore years, along with some courses in 
their major or other elective courses. 

Illinois State University is committed to continuous 
assessment of the General Education program in an effort 
to gain valuable information so that necessary improve- 
ments can be made to the curriculum. As a part of the 
General Education assessment process on our campus, stu- 
dents may be asked by a faculty member to submit a copy 
of their work to be included in the General Education 
Institutional Artifact Portfolio [LAP]. Submitting an arti- 
fact of student work for the General Education IAP will in 
no way affect a student's final grade on the assignment. 
Faculty will grade the assignment independent of the 
General Education IAP system. Results from the General 
Education IAP process are reported in aggregate to the 
Council for General Education for the primary purpose of 
improving the General Education program. The artifacts 
provided for the General Education IAP are in no way 
linked to individual students. For the purpose of General 
Education assessment the unit of analysis is the institution, 
not an individual student, faculty member, or class. 

The University Assessment Office coordinates the 
General Education Institutional Artifact Portfolio. If a stu- 
dent desires not to participate in the General Education 
Institutional Artifact Portfolio they may complete the 
Decline to Participate - Student Form which can be accessed 
at www.assessment.ilstu.edu/generaleducation. Students or 
faculty with any questions about the Institutional Artifact 
Portfolio should contact the University Assessment Office at 
(309) 438-2135. If you have any questions about your rights 
as a subject/participant in the assessment process, or if you 
feel you have been placed at risk, you can contact the 
Research Ethics and Compliance Office, Illinois State 
University, at (309) 438-8451. 

GENERAL EDUCATION 
REQUIREMENT OPTIONS 

There are three ways to complete general education 
requirements for Illinois State University. These three gener- 
al education programs have different requirements and affect 
only certain types of students. 



I. The first way is to complete Illinois State University's 
General Education Program. The General Education 
Program requires 14 courses (42 semester hours) within a 
structured three-tiered system, explained fully in the section, 
General Education Program-Illinois State University. 

The following categories of students must complete the 
Illinois State University General Education Program 
requirements: 

1. Beginning Freshmen (see Admissions section of this 
catalog for complete definition). 

2. Students who were admitted as beginning freshmen at 
Illinois State University, who were readmitted and who 
have not completed a baccalaureate-oriented associates 
degree (A.A. or A.S.) from an Illinois public communi- 
ty college and are not eligible for an earlier catalog. 

3. Transfer Students who have not completed a bac- 

calaureate-oriented associates degree (A.A. or A.S.) 
from a regionally accredited post secondary institu- 
tion and who are not eligible to complete the Illinois 
Transferable General Education core curriculum 
described below. 

II. The second way is to complete the Illinois Transferable 
General Education Core Curriculum available through the 
Illinois Articulation Initiative (IAI). This program is a 
statewide agreement between participating public col- 
leges and universities and some private schools that is 
designed to facilitate timely degree completion for stu- 
dents who transfer between institutions. The Illinois 
Transferable General Education Core Curriculum struc- 
ture consists of 12 to 13 courses (37 to 41 semester cred- 
its) distributed among five subject areas. Completion of 
these courses at any participating institution satisfies 
general education requirements. The IAI Transferable Core 
is presented in the section entitled General Education - Illinois 
Articulation Initiative (IAI). (More information about this sys- 
tem and participating institutions can be found at the following 
Website address: www.iTransfer.org.) 

The following category of students may complete the 
Illinois Transferable General Education Core Curriculum: 

1. Transfer students (See Admissions section of this cata- 
log for a complete description) who began the Illinois 
Transferable General Education Core Curriculum at a 
participating IAI institution and transferred to Illinois 
State may choose to complete the program by enrolling 
in Illinois State approved IAI courses presented in the 
section entitled Illinois Articulation Initiative Courses at 
Illinois State. Transfer students should note, however, 
that IAI course availability is quite limited. 

2. Transfer students who have completed at least one trans- 
fer course that is articulated to an IAI core requirement. 



64 University-Wide Programs 

3. Students who have completed the Illinois Transferable 
General Education Core Curriculum at a participating 
IA1 institution are considered to have met Illinois State 
University's General Education requirement. 

III. There is also a third way in which general education 
requirements can be met. 

Students who transfer with a completed baccalaureate- 
oriented associates degree (A. A. or A.S.) from a regionally 
accredited post secondary institution are considered to have 
satisfied Illinois State University's General Education 
Program requirements. Illinois State University accepts the 
AAT degree as a baccalaureate-oriented degree when the 
AAT degree includes the IAI transferable core. 

Any transfer student may choose to complete Illinois 
State University's General Education Program. 

Illinois State University offers several study abroad pro- 
grams that feature a wide variety of General Education 
classes. Interested students should contact their academic 
advisor or the Office of International Studies and Programs. 

GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM — 
ILLINOIS STATE UNIVERSITY 

The General Education Program at Illinois State 
University is an integrated set of courses that focuses on the 
development of communication and problem-solving skills 
and abilities, such as persuasion, listening, and argumenta- 
tion; logical and quantitative thinking; and understanding 
varying perspectives on issues. These skills and abilities pro- 
vide an essential grounding for work in the student's major. 

The premise of the General Education Program is that 
education should be a developmental process and not simply 
an assimilation of a prescribed set of facts. The program's 
overall structure is designed to ensure that developmental 
objectives are achieved through the coherent and sequential 
interrelationship of courses. Inner Core courses provide 
basic knowledge and skills upon which Middle Core cours- 
es build, and those courses in turn prepare students for 
courses in the Outer Core. 

The complete General Education Program consists of 14 
courses (42 semester hours), which is approximately one- 
third of the total credits required for graduation. 

Because of laboratory or recitation requirements, 
some courses are listed as four credit hours in this catalog. 
All four hours will be credited as graduation require- 
ments, but only three hours will be credited in General 
Education for these courses. 

Students will take most General Education courses 
during their freshman and sophomore years, along with 
some courses in their major or other elective courses. 
While some specific courses are important to take as part 
of preparation for a major (such as certain mathematics 
or science courses), the choice of which course to take in 
each category is a decision for students to make. Students 



are encouraged to choose courses that will give them the 
broadest possible general education and to explore and 
challenge themselves through their course choices. 

The Illinois State University General Education Program 
consists of a 14-course requirement outlined as the following: 

Inner Core (5 courses): 

— a 2-course, first-year sequence integrating composition, 

communication, critical thinking, and information litera- 
cy; 

— 1 course chosen from the inner-core mathematics catego- 

ry; and 

— 2 courses chosen from a four-course natural science cat- 

egory or an alternative science course required by cer- 
tain majors. 

Middle Core (5 course categories): 

— 5 courses, one chosen from each course category. 

Outer Core (4 courses; one from each of four discipline 
groups): 

— 4 courses, one chosen from each category. Most students 

not taking a course in their major or minor that satisfies 
the Global Studies graduation requirement will also take 
one Outer-Core course whose content focuses on the 
cultures of Asia, the Middle East, Africa, Latin America, 
or the indigenous peoples of the world (See Global 
Studies requirement). 

Students must comply with the following requirements: 

— Complete the General Education Program through com- 
pletion of at least 14 courses (42 semester hours), as des- 
ignated in the program description. 

— Students may count one General Education Middle- or 
Outer-Core course from their first major department or 
school toward the total of 14 courses. Additionally, 
depending on their major, students may be exempted 
from one General Education category (maximum of one 
course) because of disciplinary expertise gained in their 
major listed below: 

General Education Category Exemptions by 
College and Major Program: 



College of Applied Science and Technology 



AGR 
CJS 
FCS 
HSC 



ITK 
KNR 



All major programs 

All major programs 

All major programs 

Clinical Laboratory Science 

Environmental Health 

Health Education 

Health Information Management 

Safety 

All major programs 

All major programs 



MC-QR 

OC-SS 

MC-IS 

OC-SMT 

MC-QR 

MC-ICL 

OC-SMT 

OC-SMT 

OC-SMT 

OC-SMT 



University-Wide Programs 



65 



TEC 


Industrial Technology 


OC-SMT 


the first semester of their freshman year. A year-long 




Construction Management 


OC-SS 


sequence, these courses integrate critical thinking and infor- 




Graphic Communications 


OC-SMT 


mation literacy skills. The mathematics and natural science 




Industrial Computer Systems 


OC-SMT 


requirements are to be completed during the freshman year, 




Integrated Manufacturing 


OC-SMT 


or as early as possible in the first two years. 




Renewable Energy 


OC-SS 






Technology Education 


OC-SS 


Inner Core Course Listing 
(2 courses required) |IC] 


College of Arts and Sciences 












ENG 1 1 Composition as Critical Inquiry 


ANT 


All major programs 


None 


COM 1 10 Communication as Critical Inquiry 


BMB 


All major programs 


OC-SMT 




BSC 


All major programs 


OC-SMT 


Mathematics (1 course required) [IC-M] 


CHE 


All major programs 


OC-SMT 




COM 


All major programs 


MC-QR 


MAT 1 13 Elements of Mathematical Reasoning 


CSD 




OC-SMT 


MAT 120 Finite Mathematics 


ECO 


All major programs 


MC-QR 


MAT 130 Dimensions of Mathematical 


ENG 


All major programs 


MC-LH 


Reasoning 


GEO 


Geography 


OC-SS 


MAT 145 Calculus I 




Geology 


OC-SMT 




HIS 


All major programs 


MC-UST 


Natural Sciences (2 courses required) [IC-NS] 


LAN 


French 

French Teacher Certification 


None 


BSC 101 Fundamental Concepts in Biology 




Program only 
German all sequences 


OC-H 
OC-H 


CHE 102 Chemistry and Society 
GEO 102 Principles of Geology 
PHY 102 Atoms to Galaxies 




Spanish all sequences 


OC-H 




MAT 


All major programs 


OC-SMT 


Students must complete at least one course from two 


PHI 


All major programs 


OC-H 


different sciences. Certain majors require one of the follow- 


PHY 


All major programs 


OC-SMT 


ing Natural Sciences Alternative courses that substitute for 


POL 


All major programs 


MC-ICL 


the courses above. See individual major requirements. 


PSY 


All major programs 


MC-IS 




SWK 


(B.S.W.) 


None 


Natural Science Alternatives [IC-NSA] 


SOC 




None 





College of Business 

All major programs MC-IS 

College of Education 

All major programs OC-SS 

College of Fine Arts 

All major programs OC-FA 

Mennonite College of Nursing 

NUR All major programs IC-NS 

(one course only) 

— No Inner Core or Middle Core course in the 
General Education Program may be taken under the 
CT/NC option. 

General Education Course Requirements 

INNER CORE GENERAL INFORMATION 

A total of five courses are required in the Inner Core. 
Students take either ENG 101, Composition as Critical 
Inquiry, or COM 110, Communication as Critical Inquiry, 



BSC 196 


Biological Diversity 


BSC 197 


Molecular and Cellular Basis of Life 


CHE 110/112 


Fundamentals of Chemistry and 




Laboratory 


CHE 140 


General Chemistry I 


PHY 105 


Fundamentals of Physics 


PHY 108 


College Physics I 


PHY 110 


Physics for Science and Engineering I 



MIDDLE CORE GENERAL INFORMATION 

These courses provide opportunities for the continued 
development of academic skills applied to a range of top- 
ics and involving a variety of disciplinary perspectives. 
There are five course categories in the Middle Core: 

Quantitative Reasoning (MC-QR) 
Language in the Humanities (MC-LH) 
United States Traditions (MC-UST) 
Individuals and Civic Life (MC-ICL) 
Individuals and Societies (MC-IS) 

A total of five courses are required in the Middle Core. 
Students complete one course from each of the five cate- 
gories except for students pursuing a B.A. degree who sub- 
stitute LAN 115 or higher for Quantitative Reasoning. 



66 University-Wide Programs 

Middle Core Course Listing 

Quantitative Reasoning (1 course required) [MC-QR] 

Students pursuing a B.A. degree must complete the 
equivalent of LAN 115 or higher rather than one of these 
courses. 



ECO 138 


Economic Reasoning Using Statistics 


GEO 138 


Quantitative Reasoning in the Geosciences 


mens 


Reasoning About Complex Systems 


MAT 121 


Applied Calculus 


MAT 131 


Geometric Reasoning: Geometry as Earth 




Measures 


MAT 146 


Calculus II 


MAT 150 


Fundamentals of Statistical Reasoning 


MQM 100 


Statistical Reasoning 


PHI 112 


Language, Logic, and Mathematics 


PHY 117 


Numerical Reasoning in Nature and 




Technology 


POL 138 


Quantitative Reasoning in Political 




Science 


PSY 138 


Reasoning in Psychology Using Statistics 



Language in the Humanities (1 course required) [MC-LH] 

COM/ENG/ 

LAN 128 Gender in the Humanities 

ENG 1 24 Film Style and Literature 

ENGLAN 125 Literary Narrative 

IDS 1 2 1 Texts and Contexts 

IDS 254 Religions and Cultures 

LAN 116.01 Second Year Italian (Part II) 

LAN 116.12 Second Year French (Part II) 

LAN 116.13 Second Year German (Part II) 

LAN 1 1 6. 14 Second Year Latin (Part II) 

LAN 116.15 Second Year Spanish (Part II) 

LAN 116.18 Second Year Japanese (Part II) 

LAN 1 20. 1 5 Introduction to Academic Spanish for 
Spanish Speakers 

United States Traditions (1 course required) [MC-UST] 



ENG/HJS 131 
FCS/HIS/ 
SOC112 
HIS/SOC111 

SOC109 



American Culture: Traditions and Texts 

American Family: Change and Diversity 
American Diversity: Contested Visions of 
U.S. Experience 
Introduction to U.S. Latina/o Studies 



Individuals and Civic Life (1 course required) [MC-ICL] 



ANT 175 


Cross-Cultural Perspectives on 




Contemporary Human Problems 


ECO 103 


Individual and Social Choice 


GEO 140 


Human Geography 


IDS 1 1 1 


Peace Studies 


PSY 110 


Fundamentals of Psychology 


SOC108 


Contemporary Social Problems in Global 




Perspective 


TEC/SOC 175 


Living in a Technological World 


WGS 120 


Women, Gender, and Society 



OUTER CORE GENERAL INFORMATION 

These courses give insight into the varied nature of dis- 
ciplinary knowledge, introducing students to the ways that 
specific disciplines create knowledge and examining the 
interplay between disciplined inquiry and the larger world in 
which such inquiry takes place. 

A total of 4 courses are required in the Outer Core. 
Students must complete one course chosen from each of four 
discipline groups: Science, Mathematics, and Technology; 
Fine Arts; Humanities; and the Social Sciences. Students not 
satisfying the Global Studies graduation requirement 
through a major course should choose an Outer-Core 
course designated by a double asterisk. 



Outer Core Course Listing 

Science, Mathematics, and Technology 
(1 course required) [OC-SMT] 



AGR 203 
ANT 102 
BSC 145 
BSC 160 
BSC 170 
BSC 202 
CHE 204 
FCS/KNR/ 
HSC208 

GEO 202 
GEO 207 
GEO 211 
HSC 156 

IDS 265 



CJS 102 


Individuals, Society, and Justice 




PHI 104 


The Ideal of Democracy 


ITK 140 


POL 101 


Citizens and Governance 


ITK214 


POL 106 


U.S. Government and Civic Practices 




Individuals and Societies (1 course required) [MC-IS] 


PHY 205 
PHY 206 


AGR 201 


Resources, Food, and Society: A Global 


PHY 207 




Perspective 


TEC 275 



Agriculture and the Environment 
Human Origins 
Human Biology 
Microbiology and Society 
Genetics and Society 
Human Ecology 
Chemistry of Life 

Dynamics of United States 

Contemporary Health Issues 

Evolution of the Earth 

Natural Disasters 

Earth's Dynamic Weather 

Environmental Health in the 2 1 st Century: 

Meeting the Global Challenge 

Introduction to Cognitive Science: Computers, 

Minds, Brains, and Robots 

Interacting in a Digital World 

Social, Legal, and Ethical Issues in Information 

Technology 

Origin of the Universe 

Chaos and Complexity 

Energy and Climate Change 

Technology and Quality of Life 



University-Wide Programs 



67 



Social Sciences (1 course required) OC-SS 

ANT 1 85 Cultures of the World* * 

ANT/ENG/ 

LAN 143 Unity and Diversity in Language 

FCS 222 Cultural Diversity in Dress 

FCS 224 Enduring Issues for Couples and Families 

GEO 1 3 5 World Geography * * 

GEO 235 Geography of Emerging Areas** 

HSC 170 Safety and Society 

HIS 264 History of Women in North America 

POL 140 Introduction to the Politics of Africa, 

Asia, and Latin America * * 
PSY213 Lifespan Development 

PSY/SOC 223 Social Psychology 
PS Y 233 Psychology of Personality 

SOC 220 Global Social Change: An Introduction to 

Macrosociology 
SOC 240 People in Places: Understanding and 

Developing Community 
SWK 1 25 Building Healthier Communities 

Through Community Involvement 

Fine Arts (1 course required) OC-FA 



Codes used throughout the Illinois State University 
General Education Program include the following: 



ART 176 


Arts and Society: Visual Arts 


ART 275 


World Arts: Visual Arts** 


MUS 152 


Experiencing Music 


MUS 153 


Black Music I** 


MUS 154 


Black Music II** 


MUS 176 


Arts and Society: Music 


MUS 275 


World Arts: Music** 


THE 152 


Experiencing Theatre 


THE 176.01 


Arts and Society: Theatre 


THE 176.02 


Arts and Society: Film 


THE 275.01 


World Arts: Theatre** 


THE 275.02 


World Arts: Film** 


Humanities (1 


course required) OC-H 


ENG110 


British Literature and Its Contexts 


ENG150 


Masterpieces of World Literature to 1350 


ENG250 


Literature of the Bible I 


ENG251 


Literature of the Bible II 


ENG 229 


Introduction to Literary Genres 


ENG261 


Women's Literature in a Global Context 


ENGLAN206 


Cultural Expressions in Social 




Contexts: Women of Asia, Latin 




America, and Africa** 


HIS 104 


History of Asia, Middle East, Africa, 




Latin America, or Indigenous Peoples** 


HIS 107 


The Making of Europe 


IDS 203 


Nations and Narrations ** 


IDS 207 


Representation, Knowledge, and Power 


LAN 106 


Myth and Meaning 


PHI 101 


Basic Issues in Philosophy 


PHI 150 


Science and Human Culture 


PHI 202 


Sex, Values, and Human Nature 


PHI 224 


Meaning and Religious Belief 


PHI 238 


Rights and Wrongs 


PHI 251 


Visions of the Self: A Study of Minds 




and Persons 



IC 


Inner Core 


IC-M 


Inner Core - Mathematics 


IC-NS 


Inner Core - Natural Science 


IC-NSA 


Inner Core - Natural Science 




Alternatives 


MC-QR 


Middle Core - Quantitative Reasoning 


MC-LH 


Middle Core - Language in the Humanities 


MC-UST 


Middle Core - United States Traditions 


MC-ICL 


Middle Core - Individuals in Civic Life 


MC-IS 


Middle Core - Individuals and Societies 


OC-SMT 


Outer Core -Science, Mathematics, and 




Technology 


OC-SS 


Outer Core - Social Sciences 


OC-FA 


Outer Core - Fine Arts 


OC-H 


Outer Core - Humanities 



Transferring General Education 
Courses — Illinois Articulation Initiative 

The Illinois Articulation Initiative (IAI) is a statewide 
agreement among the more than 100 public and some 
selected private four-year and two-year higher education 
institutions. The agreement is designed to facilitate stu- 
dents transferring between the colleges and universities in 
Illinois. The Illinois Transferable General Education Core 
curriculum consists of 12 to 13 courses (37 to 41 hours of 
credit) within a five-category designation. The general 
requirements are as follows: 



Communication: 

Humanities and Fine Arts: 

Mathematics: 

Physical and Life Sciences: 

Social and Behavioral Sciences: 



3 courses (9 credits) 
3 courses (9 credits) 

1 to 2 courses (3 to 6 credits) 

2 courses (7 to 8 credits) 

3 courses (9 credits) 



** Courses with Global Studies designation, indicating a 
focus on cultures of Asia, the Middle East, Africa, Latin 
America, or the indigenous peoples of the world. 



IAI policy is presented on the Website, 
www.iTransfer.org, and Illinois State University's imple- 
mentation requirements are published below. Students who 
transfer out of Illinois State will be held to the requirements 
of their transfer institution. 

General Education Options For Transferring Students 

New transfer students have the option of completing 
either Illinois State's General Education program or the 
Illinois Transferable General Education Core Program 
(IAI). NOTE: To be eligible for IAI, at least one transfer 
course must have been articulated to an IAI core require- 
ment. Transfer students who have satisfactorily completed 
at least one course within the Illinois Transferable General 
Education Core are allowed to complete this program by 
enrolling in approved IAI courses at Illinois State 
University. Students should note, however, that IAI course 
availability is quite limited. 



68 University-Wide Programs 

CLEP 

Illinois State policies on CLEP credit will be used to meet 
Illinois Transferable General Education Core requirements. 

WAIVERS 

If a student satisfactorily completes the objectives of a 
General Education Core area but earns fewer hours than 
required, the remaining hours for that area can be waived. 
However, students must complete the minimum of 12 cours- 
es, 37 hours, and the number of courses required in each area 
of the Core. Fractional hours can also be waived, but the 
minimum 37 hour total is still enforced. 

For those students eligible to complete the Core, a transfer 
course articulated as an Illinois State University course 
approved for the Illinois Transferable General Education Core 
Curriculum will be utilized toward the Core. Any course from 
a participating school approved by an IAI curriculum panel 
may be used even if not articulated to an Illinois State course. 
Acceptance and placement of transfer credit as an elective 
from a non-participating IAI institution is only applicable to 
meet Illinois Transferable General Education Core (IAI) 
requirements at Illinois State University. 

Effective May 1999, a student transferring to another 
institution, who has completed at least 37 semester hours, 
may request an audit, via a transcript request, of his or her 
records for completion of the Illinois Transferable General 
Education Core Curriculum. If complete, the University will 
certify completion of the Illinois Transferable General 
Education Core requirements on the Illinois State transcript. 

Students transferring to Illinois State are required to 
fulfill all University graduation requirements. 

Illinois Articulation Initiative Course Requirements: 

Regardless of category placement, a student may 
count no more than two courses from a single discipline 
to fulfill the General Education Core Curriculum 
requirements. Only one course assigned to an IAI course 
number may be used to fulfill a requirement (For exam- 
ple, since HIS 104.01 and HIS 104.03 both carry the IAI 
number of H2 903N, only one may be used). 

Illinois State University courses approved for the 
IAI General Education Core are listed officially on the 
IAI Website, www.iTransfer.org. The following list of 
courses is provided for convenience only. Some courses 
may have been added or deleted since the publication of 
this catalog. 

Communication 

(3 courses, 9 semester hours) 

A grade ofC or better required in CI 900, ENG J 01, and CI 
901R, ENG 145. 

For students with appropriate preparation, Illinois State 
will waive CI 900. A minimum of 12 courses and 37 semester 
hours is still required. 



IAI Course Number 
and IAI Title 

C 1 900 Writing Course Sequence 
CI 901 R Writing Course Sequence 
C2 900 Oral Communication 

Mathematics 

( 1 course, 3 semester hours) 

Ml 900 College Level Calculus 

Ml 900 1 College Level Calculus I 

Ml 900 2 College Level Calculus II 

Ml 900 3 College Level Calculus III 

Ml 902 General Education Statistics 

M 1 903 Mathematics for Elementary 
Teaching I and II (limited to 
Elementary Education Majors) 

M 1 904 General Education Mathematics 

Ml 906 Finite Mathematics 



Illinois State 
Course and 
Semester Hours 

ENG 101 (3) 
ENG 145 (3) 
COM 110(3) 



MAT 121 (4) 
MAT 145 (4) 
MAT 146 (4) 
MAT 147 (4) 
ECO 138 (3) 
PSY 138 (3) 



MAT 152 (3) 
MAT 113 (4) 
MAT 120 (4) 



Physical Sciences and Life Sciences 

(2 courses, 7 semester hours) 

Students with appropriate preparation may substitute an 
initial course designed for science majors. One Life Science 
and one Physical Science course required, of which one 
must be a lab (indicated by an L, e.g. PI 901L or LI 900L). 



IAI Course Number 
and IAI Title 

PI 900L General Education Physics 

P 1 90 1 L Physics and Society 

PI 902 General Education Chemistry 

PI 902L General Education Chemistry 



PI 903 L Chemistry and Society 

PI 907L Introduction to Geology 

PI 909 Earth Science Systems 

PI 909L Earth Science Systems Lab 

P2 900L Calculus-based Physics I 

LI 904 Human Biology 

LI 906 Heredity and Society 

L 1 900L General Education Biology 

Humanities and Fine Arts 

(3 courses, 9 semester hours) 



Illinois State 
Course and 
Semester Hours 

PHY 105 (4) 
PHY 108 (5) 
PHY 102 (3) 
CHE 110(4) 
CHE 112(1) 
CHE 140 (4) 
CHE 204 (3) 
CHE 102 (3) 
GEO 102 (3) 
GEO 100 (4) 
GEO 101 (1) 
PHY 110(4) 
BSC 145 (3) 
BSC 170(3) 
BSC 101 (3) 
BSC 196 (4) 



One Humanities and one Fine Arts course required. 



H 1 900 Foreign Language IV 

H 1 900 Italian 2nd Year Part II 

H 1 900 French 2nd Year Part II 

H 1 900 German 2nd Year Part II 

H 1 900 Latin 2nd Year Part II 

H 1 900 Spanish 2nd Year Part II 



LAN 116(4) 
LAN 116.01 (4) 
LAN 116.12(4) 
LAN 116.13 (4) 
LAN 116.14(4) 
LAN 116.15(4) 



University-Wide Programs 



69 



H 1 900 Japanese 2nd Year Part II 
H2 90 1 Western Civilization I 
H2 902 Western Civilization II 
H2 903 N Non- Western Civilizations 



H2 904 U.S. History/Civilization I 

H2 905 U.S. History/Civilization II 

H3 910D American Ethnic Literature 

H3 9 1 1 D Literature and Gender 



H3 9 1 2 Survey of British Literature I 

H3 9 1 4 Survey of American Literature I 

H4 900 Introduction to Philosophy 

H9 901 Mythology 

HF 900 Humanities Survey I 

Fl 900 Experiencing Music 

Fl 905D Ethnic Traditions in 
American Music 

Fl 907 Experiencing Theatre 

Fl 909D Ethnic Traditions in American 

Theatre 

F2 90 1 History of Western Art I 

F2 902 History of Western Art II 

F2 903N Non- Western Art 

F2 905 Film Appreciation 



LAN 116.18(4) 
HIS 101 (3)+++ 
HIS 102 (3)+++ 
HE104.01 (3>H- 
HJS 104.02 (3>Hf 
HIS 104.03(3)++ 
HIS 104.04 (3>f+ 
FflS 104.05 (3}^ 
HIS 135 (3)+++ 
HIS 136 (3)+++ 
ENG 165 (3) 
ENG160(3) 
COM 128 (3) 
ENG 128 (3) 
LAN 128 (3) 
ENG 110(3) 
ENG 130(3) 
PHI 101 (3) 
LAN 106 (3) 
ENG 131 (3) 
HIS 131 (3) 
MUS152(3) 

MUS 153 (3)++ 
MUS 154(3)++ 
THE 152 (3) 

THE 154 (3) 
ART 155 (3) 
ART 156 (3) 
ART140(3)f+ 
THE 170 (3) 



++ Courses designated specifically to examine aspects of 
human diversity from a non-U. S. /non-European perspective. 

+++ Western Civilization (H2 901 or S2 902 and H2 902 
or S2 903) and American/U.S. History (H2 904 or S2 900 
or S2 901) can be used either as how it was approved for 
the school offering the course, or how the equivalent 
course at the receiving school was approved. 



Social and Behavioral Science 

(3 courses, 9 semester hours) 



Two disciplines must be represented from the following 
list: Anthropology (SI), History (S2), Economics (S3), 
Geography (S4), Politics and Government (S5), Psychology 
(S6), Sociology (S7), Social Psychology (S8). 



IAI Course Number 
and IAI Title 



53 900 Principles of Economics 

54 900N Introduction to Human 

Geography 



S5 900 



American/U.S. National 
Government I 



Illinois State 
Course and 
Semester Hours 

ECO 105 (4) 

GEO 135 (3)++ 
GEO 140 (3) 

POL 105 (3) 
POL 106 (3) 



S5 904N 
S5 905 

55 906N 

56 900 
S6 902 



International Relations 
Comparative Government 
Non- Western Comparative 
Government 
General Psychology 



POL 15 1(3)- 
POL 141 (3) 

POL 140 (3) 
PSY 110(3) 
PSY 1 1 1 (4) 



S7 900 
S7 901 

57 902 

58 900 



Life-Span Developmental 
Psychology 

Introduction to Sociology 
Social Problems 
Marriage and Family 
Social Psychology 



PSY 213 (3) 
SOC106(3) 
SOC 108 (3) 
FCS 224 (3) 
PSY 223 (3) 
SOC 223 (3) 

+ + Courses designated specifically to examine aspects of 
human diversity from a non-U. S. /non- European perspective. 

University- Wide Teacher 
Education Programs 

Chair, Council for Teacher Education: Deborah 
Curtis, Dean, College of Education 

506 DeGarmo Hall, Campus Box 5300 
(309)438-5415 

Website: www.TeacherEducation.ilstu.edu 

Realizing the Democratic Ideal: Teacher Education 
at Illinois State University 

Illinois State University has a historic and enduring 
commitment to prepare teachers and other school personnel 
who will be responsive to the ethical and intellectual 
demands of a democratic society. To teach in a democracy 
is self-consciously to take up the challenge of improving the 
ethical and intellectual quality of our societal dialogue by 
including in it as many educated voices as possible. 

The democratic ideal unites caring and knowing: the more 
voices we call into thoughtful dialogue, and the less fettered 
the mutual exchange among those voices becomes, the truer 
our convictions and conclusions will be. This is the foundation 
a democratic society, and it is why Illinois State graduates 
aspire to teach everyone, especially those on the margins, 
those who have been or are in danger of being excluded. 

This democratic conception of education informs all 
aspects of teacher education at Illinois State University. 
Graduates who are ready to meet the challenges and 
rewards of serving students in a democratic society 
embody the ethical and intellectual commitments of teach- 
ing and learning in order to realize the democratic ideal. 

The ethical commitments are: 

Sensitivity toward the varieties of individual and cul- 
tural diversity 

Disposition and ability to collaborate effectively 
with others 
• High regard for learning and seriousness of personal, pro- 
fessional, and public purpose 



70 



University- Wide Programs 



Respect for learners of all ages, with special regard 
for children and adolescents. 

The intellectual commitments are: 

Wide general knowledge and deep knowledge of the 
content to be taught 

Knowledge and appreciation of the diversity among 
learners 

Understanding of the factors that affect learning and 
appropriate teaching strategies 

Interest in and ability to seek out informational, techno- 
logical, and collegial resources 

Contagious intellectual enthusiasm and courage enough 
to be creative. 

Of the challenges facing teachers and other school per- 
sonnel in the 21st century, none is more pressing than the 
need for them to develop and maintain a strong sense of their 
ethical and intellectual commitments — a professional identi- 
ty. Toward this end, Illinois State University prepares teach- 
ers and other school personnel who have a dynamic, 
reflective sense of themselves and their mission; through 
caring and knowing they realize the democratic ideal. 

Undergraduate students interested in preparing for 
teaching careers in the public schools should consult this 
Undergraduate Catalog or contact the Teacher 
Education Coordinator of the department or school in 
which they desire certification. Contact the Cecilia J. 
Lauby Teacher Education Center, 56 DeGarmo Hall, 
(309) 438-5416, for information about admission to the 
Teacher Education programs of the University and certi- 
fication requirements. Students interested in preparing 
for teaching careers in colleges and universities should 
consult academic advisors in the discipline that they 
plan to teach for information concerning appropriate 
graduate degree preparation. 

Federal regulations require that all Illinois teacher 
preparation programs report candidate test scores to the 
Illinois State Board of Education annually on April 7; the 
state in turn reports scores to the United States Department 
of Education annually on October 7. The following April 7, 
the Secretary of Education prepares a report for Congress on 
the quality of the nation's teacher preparation programs. 

Illinois State University reported the following scores on 
February 23, 2009: 

• 2007-2008 Program Completers: 1 , 1 00 

• Basic Skills: 1 ,085 tested, 1 ,085 passed - 1 00% pass rate 

• Assessment of Professional Teaching: 1 ,080 tested, 1 ,076 
passed = 99.6 % pass rate 

Academic Content Areas: 1,003 tested, 1,003 passed = 
100% pass rate 

• Other Content Areas: 65 tested, 65 passed = 100% pass 
rate 

Teaching Special Populations: 158 tested, 158 passed = 
100% pass rate 

Summary Totals and Pass Rate: 1,100 tested, 1,096 
passed = 99.6 % pass rate 



• 2007-2008 Alternative Route Completers: 6; Basic Skills, 
100%; Assessment of Professional Teaching 100%; 
Academic Content Areas, 100%. 

For current information, see the teacher education 
Website: www.coe.ilstu.edu/teacher-education/. 

Performance-Based Assessment System 

Effective Fall 2002, the Council for Teacher Education 
began implementation of its newly adopted Teacher Education 
Performance-Based Assessment System. This system meets 
accreditation standards, as stipulated by the Illinois State Board 
of Education (ISBE) and the National Council for the 
Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). 

The performance-based assessment system is 
reviewed by the University Teacher Education 
Assessment Committee, which reports to the Council for 
Teacher Education. The Council for Teacher Education 
approves changes to the system. 

The system establishes critical points at which candi- 
dates for teacher certification will be assessed: Admission 
to Professional Studies, Admission to Student Teaching 
(clinical practice), Exit from Student Teaching (clinical 
practice), and Exit from the Program. This system ensures 
that candidates possess the knowledge, skills, perfor- 
mances, and dispositions requisite for successful teaching 
careers. When Illinois State University recommends a 
candidate for teacher certification, the entire university 
has prepared that teacher. 

For Admission to Professional Studies, candidates 
will, in addition to meeting all program requirements as 
noted in applicable sections of this catalog: 

complete 30 hours of course work successfully; 
present documented evidence of successful experiences 
with children and youth; 

submit a reflective essay on entry-level dispositions to 
teach relative to "Realizing the Democratic Ideal," to 
be retained in an electronic portfolio; 
pass the basic skills test required for ISBE teacher certi- 
fication; 

attain and retain a minimum cumulative and major GPA 
as designated by the selected teacher certification pro- 
gram, typically no less than 2.50; 
complete the Assessment of Legal and Ethical 
Conduct form; 

complete English 101 and Communication 110, with a 
grade of C or better; 

meet other performance indicators as determined by 
the Council for Teacher Education and/or individual 
teacher preparation programs; 
attain departmental approval; 
criminal history check; 

complete select Instructional Technology Passport 
System requirements; 

demonstrate dispositions that align with the Realizing 
the Democratic Ideal conceptual framework; 
demonstrate appropriate communications skills; 



University-Wide Programs 



71 



complete a safety education assessment; and 
complete a teacher education orientation and an 
ePortfolio fundamentals workshop; 

• some programs require a negative TB test (check with 
your advisor). 

For Admission to Student Teaching/Clinical Practice, 
successful candidates will: 

pass the ISBE Content Area Test(s) to ensure content 
knowledge; 

• complete a criminal history records check; 

• file verification of a negative TB test; 

retain a minimum cumulative and major GPA as desig- 
nated by the selected teacher education program; 
verify having completed clinical experiences commen- 
surate with attaining local, state, and national standards 
(a minimum of 100 hours is required); 
complete additional technology competencies and add to 
the electronic portfolio; 

• demonstrate dispositions that align with the Realizing 
the Democratic Ideal conceptual framework; 
demonstrate appropriate communications skills; 
complete the Language Arts Assessment; and 

• meet other performance indicators as determined by the 
Council for Teacher Education and/or individual teacher 
preparation programs. 

For Exit from Student Teaching/Clinical Practice, candi- 
dates will: 

complete student teaching/clinical practice with a grade 

of C or better; 

meet all requirements of the final unit-wide student 

teaching assessment; 

complete the teacher education electronic portfolio; 

demonstrate dispositions that align with the Realizing 

the Democratic Ideal conceptual framework; 

demonstrate appropriate communications skills; 

revise the reflective essay on dispositions; 

pass any additional tests for certification required by the 

state; 

complete all technology competencies as specified by 

the Performance Based Assessment System; 

complete the Multicultural/Diversity Assessment; and, 

meet other performance indicators as determined by 

Council for Teacher Education and/or individual teacher 

preparation programs. 



will: 



For Exit from the Program the successful candidates 

1: 

meet all university graduation requirements as noted in 

the applicable sections of this catalog; 

meet all program graduation requirements as noted in 

the applicable sections of this catalog; and, 

meet other performance indicators as determined by the 

Council for Teacher Education and/or individual teacher 

preparation programs. 



The information on Performance-Based Assessment 
supplements additional information already present in the 
catalog, found under University-Wide Teacher Education 



and with information for each individual teacher education 
program. The Council for Teacher Education reserves the 
right to modify performance assessment indicators in 
response to state and national accreditation mandates. 
Candidates should consult their program advisors for specif- 
ic requirements and updates on state or national mandates. 

Details regarding the performance-based assessment 
system are available at the teacher education website 

Program Requirements 

This section of the Undergraduate Catalog pro- 
vides information needed by students in Teacher 
Education programs. Students seeking further informa- 
tion or clarification of information presented here 
should contact the Office of Clinical Experiences and 
Certification Processes (CECP), located in the Cecilia J. 
Lauby Teacher Education Center in DeGarmo Hall. 
Information pertaining to requirements for admission 
and retention in Teacher Education and matters related 
to certification through Illinois State University gradu- 
ate programs is provided by the CECP Office. Matters 
related to certification at the undergraduate level are 
handled in the Evaluations Office. For additional infor- 
mation on Teacher Education at Illinois State 
University, see requirements in this catalog. 

Each student who completes a bachelor's degree pro- 
gram in an approved Teacher Education program, and 
who is recommended for certification by the Dean of the 
College of Education as having completed all require- 
ments (General Education, Professional Education, and 
field of study or area of specialization) is recommended 
for a teaching certificate in the State of Illinois. When a 
student has completed all of the requirements for a 
degree, including a recommendation from the Dean of 
the College of Education, the Evaluations Office at 
Illinois State University will send to the student the doc- 
umentation necessary to apply for the appropriate Illinois 
Teaching Certificate. In order to satisfy Illinois certifica- 
tion requirements, all candidates must pass a test of basic 
skills (reading, writing, language arts, and mathematics), 
a subject matter knowledge test, and an assessment of 
professional teaching test all administered by the Illinois 
State Board of Education. In addition, effective February 
1, 2012 students who are applying for their initial teach- 
ing certification or additional endorsements must have a 
grade of C or above in all coursework required as part of 
their certification program. This includes all endorsement 
areas, major courses and professional education. 

Students who have already completed one or more non- 
teaching degrees and who now seek admission to a teacher 
education program are advised to seek admission to the 
University as a candidate for a second bachelor's degree, 
certification only. Subsequent transcript analysis may deter- 
mine that a second degree is not required. In this instance, 
the student who received a degree from a state Teacher 
Education approved institution will be allowed to complete 
the requirements for certification without completing the 
requirements of the second bachelor's degree. Students are 



University- Wide Programs 



advised that the Teacher Education certification require- 
ments provided here are for Illinois and that they should 
check certification requirements for other states if they desire 
to be certified for teaching elsewhere. 

Students who complete a bachelor's degree program in 
Teacher Education at Illinois State University also have their 
transcripts stamped, "Student has completed a state and 
NCATE approved program in Teacher Education." (NCATE 
is the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher 
Education.) This statement indicates that the program has 
received state approval and national accreditation. This status 
usually makes it easier to obtain a teaching certificate in 
another state. 

NOTE: Certified teachers may be eligible for endorse- 
ments from the Illinois State Board of Education by tran- 
script evaluation. For previously certified teachers seeking 
a subsequent certificate, this individual should apply to 
Illinois State University as a second bachelors' degree, cer- 
tificate only candidate. 

Individuals convicted of a felony or any sex, nar- 
cotics, or drug offense should contact the Office of 
Clinical Experiences prior to application for Admission to 
Professional Studies. Applicants convicted of certain types 
of crimes may not be approved for certification by the 
Illinois State Board of Education. 

Certification Programs 

Students who fail to maintain the specific GPA 
required by their teaching or other certification program 
may be dismissed from that program. At the option of the 
department, students dropped from the program may pur- 
sue a degree in their major or be classified as Undeclared 
and will receive academic advisement from the Academic 
Advisement Center. In order to become candidates for a 
certification program after being dropped, students must 
be accepted by the department or school in which they 
desire to pursue a certification program. 

Council for Teacher Education 

The Council for Teacher Education is responsible for 
developing requirements for Teacher Education and for 
providing avenues of communication among all of the 
areas of the University concerned with Teacher Education. 
The Dean of the College of Education serves as the 
University's certification officer and is responsible for 
maintaining the relationship between campus programs and 
state certification officials. 

Admission Procedures: 

Students may monitor and assess their status regarding 
Admission to Professional Studies through the use of the 
iCampus portal. For specific directions and accompanying 
documents, please contact the Cecilia J. Lauby Teacher 
Education Center in DeGarmo Hall. Students should check 
with the major department or school regarding specific 
departmental procedures and requirements for Admission to 
Professional Studies. 



Selective Retention 

Students are required to maintain the qualification 
requirements for Admission to Professional Studies from the 
point of admission to the point of certification. 

Admission to Professional Studies is a prerequisite for 
enrollment in certain courses of the program. The prerequisite 
is listed in this Undergraduate Catalog for each of the speci- 
fied courses. 

A student must be formally admitted to Professional 
Studies and have satisfied all stipulated prerequisites prior to 
being assigned to student teaching. 



APPROVED TEACHER EDUCATION 
PROGRAMS 

The following list includes all undergraduate Teacher 
Education programs approved by the State of Illinois and 
the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher 
Education (NCATE). 

Early Childhood Education: (This certificate extends 
from Birth through Grade 3). 

Elementary (K-9): Elementary Education; Middle 
Level; Bilingual Elementary Education. 

Secondary (6-12): Agriculture; Biological Sciences; 
Chemistry; Communication Studies; Dance; Earth and 
Space Science; English; Family and Consumer 
Sciences; Geography; Health; History-Social Science; 
Technology; Mathematics; Physics; Theatre. 

Special (K-12): Art; Business Education; French; 
German; Music; Physical Education; Spanish; Specialist 
in Learning Behavior (LBS1); Specialist in Deaf and 
Hard of Hearing; Specialist in Low Vision and 
Blindness. 

NOTE: Teaching certificates are available at the graduate 
level for Reading Specialist, Alternative Route for secondary 
teaching certification and Learning Behavior Specialist II. 
Graduate level certification programs are also available for 
School Psychology, Speech and Language Impaired, and 
School Administration. 

Teacher Education Major and Minor: 

To receive a certificate a student must complete a 
Teacher Education sequence for one of the majors listed pre- 
viously. A student may also complete requirements for any 
other major or minor. 

Students seeking a high school teaching certificate 
through one of the following fields must also complete the 
requirements for a second teaching field: Dance, Health 
and Theatre. 

Program grade point requirements must be met in 
both the first and second teaching fields. The respective 
department or school will provide information on course 
work needed to complete the second teaching field. 



University-Wide Programs 



73 



Endorsements: The minimum course requirements 
for teaching fields for elementary and high school certifi- 
cates are defined by the State of Illinois and are listed on 
the certificate as an endorsement. One or more endorse- 
ments may be earned by completing requirements for the 
elementary or high school certification programs at 
Illinois State University. Additional endorsements may be 
earned through the completion of the specified course 
work and, in most cases, by passing the State content test 
in the endorsement area. The Illinois Board of Education 
determines this process. Students should contact an advi- 
sor for information on requirements for endorsements. 

General Education: To meet certification require- 
ments of the Illinois State Board of Education, all 
Teacher Education programs must meet general education 
requirements defined for the institution's approved enti- 
tlement programs. Effective fall 1998, all native students 
entering Illinois State University will complete the 
University's General Education Program. For teacher 
education students, completion of Illinois State 
University's General Education Program ensures that the 
general education requirements for teacher certification 
have been met. 

Transfer Students: 

Several options satisfy general education requirements 
for certification relative to transfer students. The Illinois 
Articulation Initiative General Education program, includ- 
ing a global perspective course, may be the general educa- 
tion component for Illinois State entitlement programs for 
the transfer student who does not choose to complete the 
University's general education program. Other options 
include Illinois State's University Studies general educa- 
tion (97-98 or earlier catalogs), an approved baccalaureate- 
oriented A.A., A.S., A.A.T. or a bachelor's degree from a 
regional accredited institution, including a global perspec- 
tive course. All of these options must include at least one 
global perspective course (Non-Western Studies). 
Completion of a course for the Global Studies graduation 
requirement will meet this requirement. 

Completion of General Education Program requirements 
does not ensure that the requirements for certification have 
been met. Students are reminded that some courses are 
required by specific programs: Introductory Psychology is a 
prerequisite for Educational Psychology; a grade of C or bet- 
ter in an English Composition course and a Speech course 
are required for Admission to Professional Studies. 

CERTIFICATES 

(See also Performance Based Assessment System) 
Early Childhood Education (Type 04) 
(Age 0-Grade 3) 

Candidates completing the Early Childhood Education 
Major will be recommended for teacher certification in 
preschool through grade 3. To complete the requirements 
for this certificate, the student must complete (1) the 



General Education requirements for an Early Childhood 
certificate and (2) the Major and Professional Education 
requirements for an Early Childhood Education Major. 
The General Education requirements for transfer students 
are listed in the previous section. Students should work 
closely with an advisor in selecting courses which will 
meet the General Education Program requirements for cer- 
tification. Major and Professional Education requirements 
are provided in the Department of Curriculum and 
Instruction section of this Undergraduate Catalog. 
Students will also show verification of having completed 
pre-student teaching field experiences commensurate with 
attaining local, state, and national standards. 

Elementary School (Type 03) 
(Grades K-9) 

Candidates completing the Elementary Education 
Major will be recommended for teacher certification in 
kindergarten through ninth grade. The student must also 
complete requirements for one or more endorsements to 
teach upper-level elementary/middle level subjects. To com- 
plete the requirements for this certificate, the student must 
complete: (1) the General Education requirements for an 
Elementary certificate, and (2) the Major and Professional 
Education requirements for the Elementary Education 
Major. Previously listed are the requirements for General 
Education for Elementary Education certification for 
transfer students. Students should work closely with an 
advisor in selecting courses which will fulfill the require- 
ments of General Education for certification. Optional 
endorsements, Major and Professional Education require- 
ments are provided in the Department of Curriculum and 
Instruction section of this Undergraduate Catalog. Students 
will also show verification of having completed pre-student 
teaching field experiences commensurate with attaining 
local, state, and national standards. Requirements for 
endorsements are available from Curriculum and Instruction 
departmental advisors. Endorsements to the certificate are 
required in order to teach departmentalized courses in the 
upper elementary, middle-level schools. An Elementary 
Education major who completes the requirements for a B.S. 
or B.S. in Education degree and completes the proposed 
required courses for the bilingual/bicultural sequence, may 
be certified as an elementary school teacher with 
bilingual/bicultural approval. 

Middle Level Teacher Education (Type 03) 
(Grades K-9) 

Candidates completing the Middle Level Teacher 
Education Major will be recommended for teacher certifi- 
cation in kindergarten through ninth grade with two or 
more endorsements to teach upper-elementary/middle 
level subjects. To complete the requirements for this cer- 
tificate, the student must complete (1) the General 
Education requirements for an Elementary certificate, (2) 
the Major and Professional Education requirements for 
the Middle Level Teacher Education Major, and (3) spe- 
cialization requirements. The requirements for General 



74 



University-Wide Programs 



Education for transfer students are listed in the previous 
section for Elementary Education certification. Students 
should work closely with an advisor in selecting courses 
which will meet the requirements of General Education 
Program, General Education for certification, and special- 
ization. Major and Professional Education requirements 
are provided in the Department of Curriculum and 
Instruction section of the Undergraduate Catalog. 
Students will also show verification of having completed 
pre-srudent teaching field experiences commensurate with 
attaining local, state, and national standards. 

Students in the program may prepare to teach in 
selected subject areas of the middle level school: 
Language Arts, Science, Social Studies, Health, Physical 
Education, Mathematics, Industrial Arts, Art, and 
Reading. See the description for the Middle Level 
Teacher Education program in the Curriculum and 
Instruction section of the Undergraduate Catalog. 
Students should confer with their academic advisors when 
selecting courses in the areas of concentration so that 
such courses may enable them to meet the Illinois State 
Board of Education requirements for endorsements. A 
certificate must be endorsed in order to teach middle level 
and/or departmentalized upper elementary. 

High School (Type 09) 
(Grades 6-12) 

Candidates completing a Teacher Education sequence 
of a specified major will be recommended for teacher cer- 
tification in 6-12. To complete requirements for this cer- 
tificate, the student must complete (1) the General 
Education requirements for High School Certificates, (2) 
the Professional Education requirements for Secondary 
Majors, and (3) field of study requirements. The require- 
ments for General Education for transfer students are pre- 
viously listed. Professional Education and field of study 
requirements are listed in the following section. 

Students seeking secondary education certification 
(6-12) interested in teaching in a departmental Middle 
Level School will need a Middle Level Teacher 
Education endorsement after July 1, 1997. For specific 
details, contact the Teacher Education advisor in the 
respective academic area. 

Professional Education Requirements: 

Each student preparing for type 9 certificate must com- 
plete the following courses: EAF 228 or 231 or 235 (3 
hours); PSY 215 (3 hours); C&I 212 (2 hours), 214 (3 
hours), 216 (3 hours); Student Teaching 399; and all 
Professional Education courses must be passed with a 
grade of C or better. Students will also show verification of 
having completed pre-student teaching field experiences 
commensurate with attaining local, state, and national stan- 
dards. Special Methods courses are listed as part of the aca- 
demic major. Courses to meet Professional Education 
requirements may not be taken for credit/no credit. 



FIELDS OF STUDY 

Fields of Study Requirements: 

The student must complete a Teacher Education 
sequence of a specified major to earn a 6-12 teaching 
certificate. The approved Teacher Education Major or 
Comprehensive Major may be selected from the follow- 
ing programs which are described in detail in the under- 
graduate Fields of Study section of this Undergraduate 
Catalog. Education minors or a second major may be 
elected by any student. 

Fields of Study: 

Agriculture — Education Major 
Biological Sciences — Education Major and 

Education Minor 
Chemistry — Education Major and Education Minor 
Communication Studies — Education Major and 

Education Minor 
Dance — Education Major and Education Minor 
English — Education Major and Education Minor 
Family and Consumer Sciences — Education Major 
Geography — Education Major and Education Minor 
Geology — Earth and Space Science Education Major 
Health — Education Major and Education Minor 
History-Social Science — Education Major and 

History Education Minor 
Mathematics — Education Major and Education Minor 
Physics — Education Major and Education Minor 
Teaching English as a Second Language — 

Education Minor 
Technology — Education Major and Education Minor 
Theatre — Education Major and Education Minor 

Students should confer with their academic advisors 
when selecting courses in the minor area so that such 
courses may enable them to meet requirements of the 
Illinois State Board of Education endorsements which must 
be satisfied in order to teach in high schools in Illinois. 
This process is currently under review at the Illinois Board 
of Education. Requirements of endorsements are available 
from department advisors and from University College 
Academic Advisement. 

Special (Grades K-12) - other than Special Education 
(Type 10) 

Candidates completing a comprehensive major in select- 
ed fields of study will be recommended for a certificate for 
teaching the subjects named therein in all grades of the com- 
mon school. To complete requirements for this certificate, 
the student must complete (1) the General Education 
requirements for a High School Certificate, (2) the 
Professional Education requirements for K-12 majors, and 



University-Wide Programs 



75 



(3) field of study requirements. The requirements for 
General Education for transfer students are previously 
listed. Professional Education and field of study require- 
ments are listed in the following section. 

Professional Education Requirements: 

Each student preparing for a type 10 certificate (other 
than Special Education) must complete the following 
Program: EAF 228 or 231 or 235 (3 hours); PSY 215 (3 
hours) or C&I 210 (3 hours) depending on individual pro- 
gram requirements; C&I 212 (2 hours), 214 (3 hours) except 
for Music, 216 (3 hours) except for Music; Student Teaching 
399; and all Professional Education courses must be passed 
with a grade of C or better. Students will also show verifica- 
tion of having completed pre-student teaching field experi- 
ences commensurate with attaining local, state, and national 
standards. Students enrolled in Special K-12 programs will 
be assigned to do student teaching in K-12 sites. Courses to 
meet the Professional Education requirement may not be 
taken for Credit/No credit. K-12 Music majors are not 
required to complete C&I 214 or 216. 

Fields of Study Requirements: 

An approved Teacher Education program for students 
enrolled in a Special K-12 Program may be selected from 
the following programs which are described in detail in the 
undergraduate Fields of Study section of the Undergraduate 
Catalog: 

Art — Comprehensive Education Major 

Business Teacher Education — Business Teacher 

Education Major 

Foreign Languages — Education Major 

Music — Education Major 

Physical Education — Education Major 

Students who complete one of the programs above and 
earn a K-12 certificate may teach only in that area. Students 
may add endorsements to a K-12 certificate. Students should 
confer with their academic advisors when selecting courses 
in the minor area so that such courses may enable them to 
meet requirements of the Illinois State Board of Education. 

Special Education (P-21) (Type 10) 

Students in Special Education may complete a sequence 
in any of the following areas: Specialist in Learning and 
Behavior, Specialist in Deaf and Hard of Hearing, and 
Specialist in Low Vision and Blindness. To ensure full certi- 
fication, the pattern of preparation should include General 
Education as previously described for transfer students, and 
the Professional Education and Area of Specialization 
requirements described in the Special Education section of 
this Undergraduate Catalog. 

All students will show verification of having completed 
pre-student teaching field experiences commensurate with 
attaining local, state, and national standards. Students 
enrolled in the approved Special Education sequences will 
be assigned to do student teaching in K-12 sites. 



CLINICAL EXPERIENCES IN TEACHER 
EDUCATION 

Observation, participation, studies of individual 
pupils, simulated teaching, individual field work, student 
teaching and practicum are included in the Clinical 
Experiences program. The experiences offered prior to 
student teaching are usually integral parts of specific col- 
lege courses. Clinical Experiences are provided in off- 
campus professional development schools, in local 
schools and in campus laboratory schools, in agencies 
and other approved non-school settings. The Office of 
Clinical Experiences and Certification Processes coordi- 
nates all placements for Clinical Experiences. All stu- 
dents will show verification of having completed 
pre-student teaching field experiences commensurate 
with attaining local, state, and national standards. 
Students must provide their own transportation to 
Clinical Experience sites. 

The approximate number of clinical hours and type 
of activity associated with each course offering can be 
found with the appropriate course description in this 
Undergraduate Catalog. The following legend relates to 
the type and kind of activity related to a specific course. 

Clinical Experiences Legend 



1. 


Observation 


2. 


Tutoring one on one contact 


3. 


Non-instruction assisting 


4. 


Instructional aiding a group 


5. 


Micro teaching 


6. 


Simulation lab exercises 


7. 


Work with clinic client 


8. 


Graduate practicum 


9. 


Professional meeting 


10 


Other 



STUDENT TEACHING REQUIREMENTS 

The following applies to all those student teaching: 

The number of semester hours of student teaching 
required varies with the student's curriculum. A student 
does student teaching in his or her major field of study. A 
student must meet all eligibility requirements for student 
teaching in that major field. 

The following requirements must be met prior to par- 
ticipation in student teaching. Students may be removed 
from the student teaching assignment if at any time these 
requirements are not met. 

1. Approval for student teaching by the Director of 
Clinical Experiences and Certification Processes 
(CECP) Office. This approval will include verification 
of all of the following: 



76 



University-Wide Programs 



a. formal Admission to Professional Studies at least 1 
semester prior to the beginning of the student teach- 
ing semester; 

b. successful completion at Illinois State University 
of at least 4 hours of Professional Education 
approved by the appropriate education department; 

c. a minimum of 85 hours of college credit earned; 

d. completion of pre-student teaching field experi- 
ences commensurate with attaining local, state, 
and national standards; 

e. an application for student teaching filed in the 
Office of CECP at least 6 months prior to the 
planned student teaching semester; 

f. satisfactory completion of prerequisite courses to 
STT 399 (listed under University-wide Courses); 

g. meeting all requirements of Admission to 
Professional Studies and Admission to Student 
Teaching as stated in the Performance-based 
Assessment System; 

2. Approval for student teaching by the student's major 
department chairperson or school director or designee. 
This approval will be based on the following criteria. 
The student: 

a. has demonstrated content knowledge in the stu- 
dent's major area of study; 

b. possesses professional knowledge necessary for 
performing teaching responsibilities; 

c. has performed at an acceptable level during the pre- 
student teaching clinical experiences; 

d. shows evidence of professional characteristics and 
interpersonal skills necessary for working with chil- 
dren and youth; 

e. has completed all other departmental/school require- 
ments, including minimum major GPA (see major 
department or school for additional requirements). 

Student Teaching Assignments 

The University will assign student teachers to selected 
schools or professional development schools (PDS) in 
Illinois during regular semesters. Personnel of the Office of 
Clinical Experiences and Certification Processes, in coopera- 
tion with the head of the student's major department or 
school, make the student teaching assignments and perform 
procedures related to student teaching. Teacher candidates 
may not self-place. Student teachers are assigned only to 
classrooms that have regularly employed full time and fully 
qualified teachers. Assignments are not made to a school in 
which the teacher candidate or a family member is currently 
or has been employed. A student teacher may not receive a 
salary or an income for student teaching. 

During this period in the school, the student teacher 
works with one or more cooperating teachers who are 
responsible for teaching a specific group or groups of 
pupils. These cooperating teachers, along with the 
University supervisors, have responsibility for guiding and 
evaluating the work of the student teacher. During this 
experience, the student becomes a member of the school 
staff and of the community in which he or she is working. 



Any student who has a prolonged illness or temporary 
disability and who is unable to continue in his/her student 
teaching assignment should consult with the Associate 
Director of the Office of Clinical Experiences. A clearance 
from a physician will be required stating that the student is 
again able to continue in his/her student teaching assign- 
ment without any contingencies. 

The Associate Director of Clinical Experiences, upon 
the recommendation of the college supervisor, chairperson, 
or director of the student's major department or school, 
may remove a student from the assignment or require a stu- 
dent to do additional work and continue student teaching 
until the student is sufficiently competent to be recom- 
mended for certification. Entitlement for certification is not 
an automatic procedure. 

Student teaching assignments begin and end on the 
dates indicated in the student's official notice of assign- 
ment. Ordinarily, the student is expected to follow the 
school calendar of the school in which student teaching is 
done insofar as vacations and school holidays are con- 
cerned. Changes in dates involved in an assignment must 
receive the prior permission of the Associate Director of 
Clinical Experiences. 

A teacher education candidate for initial certification 
must earn a grade of C or better in student teaching in 
order for the Dean of the College of Education to recom- 
mend that the Evaluations Office send to the candidate 
the proper documentation to apply for the appropriate 
Illinois Teaching Certificate to be issued by the Illinois 
State Board of Education. 

Complaints Regarding Teacher Education Matters: 

For information on how to appeal department and col- 
lege decisions regarding admission, retention, evaluation, 
and certification relative to Teacher Education, contact the 
Cecilia J. Lauby Teacher Education Center, 56 DeGarmo 
Hall. All appeals regarding teacher education will be 
reviewed only by the Teacher Education Review 
Board/Council for Teacher Education. 

Certification for Persons Who Have Been Convicted of a 
Crime: 

Students who have been convicted of felonies or any sex, 
narcotics or drug offenses may be ineligible for certification in 
the State of Illinois. If candidates can answer "yes" to any of 
the following questions, they must contact the Associate 
Director of the Cecilia J. Lauby Teacher Education Center, 
DeGarmo Hall prior to application for Admission to 
Professional Studies: 

Have you ever been convicted of a felony, or any sex, 
narcotics or drug offense in Illinois or any other state? 
Have you ever been named by a state agency responsi- 
ble for child welfare as a perpetrator in an indicated 
report of child abuse or neglect if such report was not 
reversed after exhaustion of any appeal? Are you in 
default on an Illinois student loan for which you have 



failed to establish a satisfactory repayment plan with the 
Illinois Student Assistance Commission? Have you ever 
had a certificate denied, suspended or revoked in Illinois 
or any other state? Have you failed to file a tax return 
with the Illinois Department of Revenue, or failed to pay 
any tax, penalty, or interest owed or any final assess- 
ment of same for any tax as required by law adminis- 
tered by that Department was not subsequently resolved 
to the Department's satisfaction? 

In many cases such offenders may become certified as 
teachers in the State of Illinois if the offense is not one which 
bars the person from certification and employment in public 
schools and if the institution has followed certain proce- 
dures. According to the Illinois State Board of Education, 
institutions should have information regarding convictions at 
the beginning of a student's career in teacher education. This 
allows the institution time to observe the student's perfor- 
mance and the State Board time to determine whether the 
conviction is one which would bar an individual from 
employment in a public school or from certification. The 
Council for Teacher Education at Illinois State University 
has established strong standards for admission and retention 
in teacher education programs. Beyond the criteria listed 
above for state certification issues related to criminal convic- 
tions, any teacher candidate who has two or more criminal 
convictions in the preceding three years may be refused 
progress through a teacher education program at Illinois 
State University. If there is any question about these stan- 
dards, please contact the Associate Director of the Cecilia J. 
Lauby Teacher Education Center, Room 56, DeGarmo Hall, 
as early as possible. 

University-Wide Curriculum 

Illinois State University offers major and minor pro- 
grams that allow students to synthesize knowledge that spans 
two or more academic disciplines. Each interdisciplinary 
program is directed by a faculty member. Faculty from 
across the University deliver courses within these programs. 
In addition, the University offers interdisciplinary (IDS) 
courses that transcend the boundaries of a single discipline. 

The following courses, majors, minors, and require- 
ments may apply and be available to students from a wide 
variety of majors and disciplines. These include: 

Majors 

• Interdisciplinary Studies: B.A., B.S. 

• University Studies: B.A., B.S. 



Minors 



African-American Studies 

African Studies 

Children's Studies 

Civic Engagement and Responsibility 

Cognitive Science 

Ethnic Studies 



University-Wide Programs 77 

Interdisciplinary Studies 

International Studies 

Latin American, Caribbean and Latino/a Studies 

Middle Eastern and South Asian Studies 

Native American Studies 

Peace and Conflict Resolution Studies 

Urban Studies 

Women's and Gender Studies 

Courses 

Honors Courses 
• Interdisciplinary Courses 
International Studies Courses 

University-Wide Majors 

MAJOR IN INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES 

Program Coordinator: Jim Weinzierl 
336 Schroeder, Campus Box 4660 
(309) 438-8579 

Web address: IDS.UlinoisState.edu 

Degrees Offered: B.A., B.S. 

General Information 

Under the Major in Interdisciplinary Studies, a student 
may construct one of three individualized programs of 
study that differ from the University's regular major pro- 
grams. These options use existing University courses and 
lead to the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree 
in Interdisciplinary Studies. Each sequence addresses a dif- 
ferent set of educational objectives. 

I. The Individualized Sequence of the Major in 
Interdisciplinary Studies allows a student to design, 
with the help of a faculty sponsor, a specialized pro- 
gram of study that is not offered by the University. 
This program is intended for the student whose specif- 
ic interests cannot be accommodated within existing 
programs. Some topics recently chosen by students 
include Classical Civilization, Agricultural 
Communication, Three-Dimensional Design, Human 
Services and Needs, International Public 
Administration, and Theatre Management. The 
Individualized Sequence is often a second or auxiliary 
major but may be proposed as a primary major. 

II. The Multidisciplinary Studies Sequence of the Major in 
Interdisciplinary Studies is built around the offerings of 
two or more departments or schools. It is intended for 
the student who is seeking a baccalaureate degree with- 
out the specialization of a traditional major. The student 
chooses the focus of the program, with the help of a fac- 
ulty advisor, by determining the departments or schools 
in which he or she wishes to pursue advanced work. 

III. The Human and Educational Services Sequence recog- 
nizes work that students have completed in working 



78 



University-Wide Programs 



toward a degree in Special Education (SED) or 
Curriculum and Instruction (C&l). Completion of this 
degree program does not allow for certification as a 
teacher. 

Please note: The major in Interdisciplinary Studies does 
not prepare a student for a specific professional career or 
graduate field, nor does it satisfy the requirements for 
Teacher Certification. Because of its general nature, this 
program may require graduates to convince prospective 
employers or graduate schools that the students' degree 
preparation will enable them to succeed in a particular job 
or educational endeavor. 

Procedure: 

1. Admission to the Individualized and Multidisciplinary 
Studies Sequences of the Major in Interdisciplinary 
Studies may be requested after the completion of 15 
semester hours of course work and before the comple- 
tion of 75 semester hours. Applications must be submit- 
ted during September and February. 

2. Information on the application process is available in 
336 Schroeder Hall. Applicants should select an appro- 
priate faculty advisor. The proposed plan of study must 
be approved by the faculty advisor, the Interdisciplinary 
Studies Major Committee, and the Office of the Provost. 
For the Human and Educational Services Sequence, stu- 
dents must be majors in either Special Education or 
Curriculum and Instruction and will receive advisement 
from their departmental advisor. 

3. Except for the Human and Educational Services 
Sequence, at least one-half of the course work in the 
sequence must be taken after the proposal has been 
approved. No more than one-sixth of the course work in 
the sequence may be transferred from another institution 
of higher education. 

4. Changes in an approved plan of study must be autho- 
rized in advance. A letter outlining the proposed 
change, and countersigned by the faculty advisor, 
should be submitted to Jim Weinzierl, Campus Box 
4660, 336 Schroeder Hall. Requests for changes in 
more than one-sixth of the approved program consti- 
tute a new proposal and must be resubmitted subject 
to all the conditions of an initial application. 

5. If the Individualized Sequence is a student's primary 
major, courses included in the approved program may not 
be used to meet General Education requirements. Only 
one course from the departments or schools specified in 
the Multidisciplinary Sequence may be used to meet the 
General Education requirements. 

MAJOR IN INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES 

General Requirements: 

1 . 1 20 semester hours. 

2. Completion of General Education requirements. 



3. 42 senior-college (200- to 300-level) hours, 9 hours of 
which must be at the 300-level. 

4. A 3.25 cumulative GPA at the time of application for 
Individualized and Multidisciplinary Studies Sequences, a 
3.00 GPA at time of application for Human and 
Educational Services Sequence. 

Major in Interdisciplinary Studies; Individualized 
Sequence Requirements: 

The Individualized Sequence is an Interdisciplinary 
program that may be used to attain specific educational 
goals that cannot be accommodated by existing majors at 
Illinois State. The Major in Interdisciplinary Studies: 
Individualized Sequence is usually a second auxiliary 
major but may be proposed as a primary major. 

Students who complete the Individualized Sequence 
will earn a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Sciences degree 
and have their transcripts noted: "Major in Interdisciplinary 

Studies: Individualized Sequence: " (the 

theme that is specified on the plan of study). 

— 120 hour graduation requirement, including General 
Education requirements and 42 senior-college (200- to 
300-level) hours. 

— Approved plan of study from at least two academic 
departments or schools containing 36-55 hours. 

Major in Interdisciplinary Studies; 
Multidisciplinary Studies Sequence Requirements: 

Students who complete the Multidisciplinary 
Studies Sequence will earn a Bachelor of Arts or 
Bachelor of Science degree and have their transcripts 
noted: "Major in Interdisciplinary Studies: 
Multidisciplinary Studies Sequence." 

— 120-hour graduation requirement, including General 
Education requirements and 42 senior-college (200- to 
300-level) hours. 

— An approved plan of study with a minimum of 36 
hours from at least two departments or schools, includ- 
ing 12 senior-college hours (200- to 300-level) from 
each of 2 departments or schools and a maximum of 25 
hours from any one of the departments or schools. 

Major in Interdisciplinary Studies; Human and 
Educational Services Sequence Requirements: 

Only those students who leave the Special Education or 
Curriculum and Instruction major their senior year will be eli- 
gible for admission into the Major in Interdisciplinary Studies; 
Human and Educational Services Sequence. Applicants to this 
program must be referred by Special Education or Curriculum 
and Instruction department advisors. Students in this program 
will earn a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science Degree 
and have their transcripts noted: "Major in Interdisciplinary 
Studies: Human and Educational Services Sequence." 

— 120-hour graduation requirement, including General 
Education requirements and 42 senior-college (200- to 
300-level) hours must be met. 



— In addition, the approved plan of study must include a 
minimum of 36 semester hours, of which at least 24 
hours are at the 200-300 level. These courses must 
include a minimum of 27 hours from Special Education 
and/or Curriculum and Instruction, as well as 9 hours of 
advisor-approved electives from departments outside of 
Special Education and Curriculum and Instruction. 

MAJOR IN UNIVERSITY STUDIES 

Program Coordinator: University College 
324 Fell Hall, Campus Box 4060 
(309)438-3217 

Degrees Offered: B.A., B.S. 
Admission Requirements: 

This degree program is intended for students who are 
admitted and enrolled at Illinois State University and who 
either are unable to meet the admission/retention require- 
ments for majors with requirements above the University 
minimums, or who while performing successfully in their 
major, discover late in their program of study that they do 
not wish to pursue the career path that follows from their 
initial major and degree choice. 

NOTE: The Major in University Studies is not as clearly 
understood outside the university as traditional bac- 
calaureate majors. Students earning this degree may be 
required to persuade prospective employers or graduate 
schools that this degree will enable them to be successful 
in a particular job or a future educational endeavor. 

In order to be admitted to the major, applicants must: 

— have completed a minimum of sixty (60) hours and be in 
good academic standing with a GPA of 2.00 or higher, 
and 

— complete an approved Plan of Study in collaboration 
with a program advisor. 

This degree is not available to second bachelor degree 
candidates. 

Degree Requirements: 

— Completion of all graduation requirements for the B.A. 
or the B.S. degree as listed in this Undergraduate 
Catalog. 

— Completion of all course requirements as listed on the 
student's approved Plan of Study. (All changes to the 
initial Plan must be approved by the program advisor.) 

— A minimum of 9 credit hours in the major taken at the 
300-level. 

— General Studies Option: A concentration of a mini- 
mum of 18 hours in each of two different disciplines as 
approved in the Plan of Study, or 

— Specialized Studies Option: A concentration of a mini- 
mum of 30 hours in one department or school as 
approved in the Plan of Study, or 



University-Wide Programs 79 

— Liberal Studies Option: A concentration of a minimum 
of 36 hours bridging academic disciplines as approved 
in the Plan of Study. 

University-Wide Minors 

MINOR IN AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES 

Advisor: Ronald Gifford, Department of History 
321 Schroeder Hall, Campus Box 4420 
(309) 438-8298, rmgiffo@ilstu.edu 

The Minor in African-American Studies provides an 
interdisciplinary approach to exploring facets of Black cul- 
ture within the United States. This program is designed to be 
of interest to students who want to explore the many contri- 
butions of African-Americans to the political, historical, 
social and artistic fabric of the United States. Students are 
required to take a core of three courses on African- American 
history and literature, as well as elective courses in the 
social sciences (History, Sociology, and Politics and 
Government) and in the humanities and fine arts (English, 
Music, and Theatre). 

— 24 hours required. 

— Required core (9 hours): ENG 165; HIS 257, 258. 

— Choose 3 courses (9 hours) from group A and 2 courses 
(6 hours) from group B. 

Group A (9 hours): HIS 1 1 1 or SOC 111; 
POL 140, 334; SOC 264. 

Group B (6 hours): ENG 265, 365; IDS 203.05; MUS 
153, 154; THE 154. 

Other courses approved by the minor advisor may be count- 
ed toward the minor. 

NOTE: Please refer to specific departments or schools for 
further course information including prerequisites. 

MINOR IN AFRICAN STUDIES 

Director: Agbenyega Adedze, Department of History 
315 Schroeder Hall, Campus Box 4420 
(309) 438-8367, adedze@ilstu.edu 

Advisor: Ronald Gifford, Department of History 
321 Schroeder Hall, Campus Box 4420 
(309) 438-8298, rmgiffo@ilstu.edu 

A Minor in African Studies will complement a major in 
several disciplines. It is therefore designed as a multidiscipli- 
nary program where the student will take courses in the social 
sciences, arts, and humanities (Anthropology/Sociology; 
Languages, Literatures, and Cultures; English; Geography; 
History; Music; Politics and Government; and Theatre). The 
Minor will provide students with a broad background in 
African history, societies, culture, and politics. The program 
is directed towards students with a view of visiting or work- 
ing in Africa or those who are interested in government or 
public service careers. 



University-Wide Programs 



— 2 1 hours required. 

— 9 hours required (3 courses) from the following: GEO 
235, 250; HIS 104.01, 265, 266; POL 246. (At least 
two disciplines must be represented from this list.) 

— Choose 4 courses (12 hours) from the following elec- 
tives: GEO 235.01, 250; HIS 104.01, 265, 266; POL 
246 (if not taken as part of required core); ANT 181, 
185; LAN 206; MUS 139.21, 153, 154, 239.21; THE 
271,275. 

— No more than 9 hours may be selected from the stu- 
dent's first or second major department. 

Other courses approved by the minor advisor may be 
counted toward the minor. 

NOTE: Please refer to specific departments or schools for 
further course information including prerequisites. 

African Studies minors are encouraged to study abroad 
in Africa. There are a number of study abroad programs in 
which students can participate that range in length from a 
summer to a semester, or an entire academic year. 
Interested students should contact the Office of 
International Studies and Programs. 

MINOR IN CHILDREN'S STUDIES 

Advisor: Dr. Roberta Seelinger Trites, Department of English 
409 Stevenson Hall, Campus Box 4240 
(309) 438-4572, seeling@ilstu.edu 

The Minor in Children's Studies provides an opportu- 
nity for students to enhance their knowledge of children 
and child culture through interdisciplinary exploration of 
child-related issues. This program is designed to be of 
interest to students who wish to pursue child-related 
emphases in their major disciplines, such as children's lit- 
erature, child psychology, children's history and culture, 
pediatrics, juvenile justice, or social work with children, 
or for those who wish to learn more about the subject of 
childhood from multidisciplinary frames of reference. 
The minor will also provide a foundation for those stu- 
dents who intend to go to professional or graduate school 
to pursue child-centered research interests. 

— A minimum of 24 hours, including FCS 1 12 or HIS 1 12 
or SOC 112 and one of the following: FCS 101, PSY 
301,C&I210. 

— The remaining 1 8 hours must include a minimum of 2 
courses from Group A and a minimum of 2 courses 
from Group B. 

— Group A: ENG 170, 271, 272, 370, 372, 373, 374, 375; 
MUS 371. 

— Group B: C&I 233; CJS 215; CSD 115, 175; FCS 231; 
233; 250; HIS 261, 262, 330; NUR 208; POL 339; PSY 
215, 302; 346; SOC 262. 

— With permission of the minor advisor the follow- 
ing categories of courses may be counted toward 
the minor. 



1 -3 hours of an internship with a child-related 
agency, arranged through a department. 
1-3 hours of an independent study on a child- 
related topic. 

1-3 hours of a special topics course on a child- 
related topic, offered through a department. 

— NOTE: No more than 9 hours may be selected from 
the student's first or second major department. 

MINOR IN CIVIC ENGAGEMENT AND 
RESPONSIBILITY 

Advisor: Dr. Lance Lippert, School of Communication 
424 Fell Hall, Campus Box 4480 
(309) 438-8869; llipper@ilsru.edu 

In teaching civic engagement at Illinois State University, 
we strive to develop civically responsible individuals who 
embrace their membership in communities and society by 
owning social issues and working to be a part of the solution, 
which requires ethical and civic judgements and actions 
when appropriate. Illinois State University's values are at 
the core of this minor as students will prepare to participate 
in social change as well as develop an awareness of personal 
social responsibility. This minor is intended to prepare stu- 
dents to engage actively in their citizenship. The interdisci- 
plinary minor is open to all students of any ideological 
viewpoint and can be positively matched with any major as a 
way to broaden the student's learning experience and career 
perspectives. A civically educated individual (1) gains a 
sense of self-awareness as a citizen, (2) actively participates 
in community service, (3) develops an appreciation of diver- 
sity, (4) comprehends the interdepedence within communi- 
ties, societies, and the world, (5) grows an understanding of 
the democratic process, (6) displays critical thinking within 
the arena of democratic conversations and social issues, (7) 
becomes effective at problem-solving and change, and (8) is 
able to personally integrate reflection on service, social 
issues, and course content. This minor will provide students 
with opportunities to sharpen critical analysis, skill develop- 
ment, and personal reflection as well as substantive opportu- 
nities to study and perform civic engagement in their 
communities. 

— 2 1 hours required. 

— Prerequisites for Minor: COM 1 10; ENG 101 . 

— Required core courses (9 hours): IDS 125, 398.02; POL 
101. 

— Choose 4 courses (12 hours) from the following (only 
one 100-level course can be taken): CJS 201; COM 201, 
270, 272, 274, 303, 304, 371, 375; EAF 228, 231, 235; 
FCS 328, 333; HIS 240, 253, 272; PHI 104, 150, 234, 
236, 240; POL 105, 106, 214, 220, 221, 222, 225, 233, 
312; SOC 240, 333, 366; TEC 175; THE 154, 270, 344. 

— NOTE: Other courses approved by the Minor Advisor 
may be counted toward the minor. 

— NOTE: No more than two elective courses (6 hours) 
can be taken in any single department. 



University-Wide Programs 



81 



MINOR IN COGNITIVE SCIENCE 

Director: David L. Anderson 
Department of Philosophy 
323H Stevenson Hall, Campus Box 4540 
(309) 438-7175; dlanders@ilstu.edu 

— A minimum of 24 hours required for the minor, depend- 
ing on the emphasis chosen and the level of preparation 
of student. Programs must be planned in consultation 
with an advisor. Students are required to seek an advisor 
through the Director of Cognitive Science Studies. 

— Required courses: One course is required of all students, 
IDS 265: Introduction to Cognitive Science: Computers, 
Minds, Brains, and Robots. Other requirements will be 
met by developing a planned course of study approved 
by a Cognitive Science Studies advisor. In consultation 
with the advisor, the student will choose an emphasis 
that is outside the student's major and will fulfill the 
requirements of that emphasis. 

Emphases: 

Computer Science: ITK 168, 179; 2 courses (6 hours) 
from Groups A and/or B; 1 course (3 hours) from Group B; 
and 2 elective courses (6 hours) from Groups C, D, E, or F. 

Linguistics: PHI 112 or 210; ENG 341; 2 courses (6 
hours) from Groups A and/or B; 1 course (3 hours) from 
Group C; and 2 elective courses (6 hours) from Groups B, 
D, E, or F. 

Philosophy: PHI 112 or 210, PHI 253 or 315; 2 
courses (6 hours) from Groups A and/or B; 1 course (3 
hours) from Group D; and 2 elective courses (6 hours) 
from Groups B,C, E, or F. 

Psychology: PSY 138 (recommended) or ECO 138 
(acceptable); PSY 231; 2 courses (6 hours) from Groups A 
and/or B; 1 course (3 hours) from Group E; 2 elective courses 
(6 hours) from Groups B, C, D, or F. 

Course Groups: 

Group A (Quantitative Skills): MAT 120, 145, 146, 
175, 250, 260; PHI 1 12 or 210 (MAT 210); PSY 138 (rec- 
ommended) or ECO 138. 

Group B (Computer Science): ITK 168, 179, 261, 
279, 327, 340, 367, 388. 

Group C (Linguistics): ANT/ENG/LAN 143, 
ANT/ENG 342; ANT 277; COM 370, 372; CSD 175; 
ENG 241, 243, 245, 310, 341, 344; LAN 209.12, 215.15, 
262.15,310.13,340.12,360.15. 

Group D (Philosophy): PHI 250, 251, 253, 255, 256, 
315; PHI *305, *310, *363. NOTE: Courses with * maybe 
used only when the topic is approved by a Cognitive 
Science advisor. 

Group E (Psychology): PSY 231, 253, 263, 331.04, 
331.07,360,361,367,368,369. 



Group F (Related Courses): ANT 286, 288, 290; BSC 
286, 297, 343. 

NOTE: Please refer to specific departments for fur- 
ther course information. 

Cognitive Science Course 

IDS 

265 INTRODUCTION TO COGNITIVE 
SCIENCE: COMPUTERS, MINDS, 
BRAINS, AND ROBOTS OC-SMT 

3 sem. hrs. 

Explores fundamental principles from Psychology, 
Computer Science, Philosophy, Linguistics, Biology, that 
contribute to the scientific study of intelligent systems 
(minds). Prerequisites: Inner Core; MC-QR or one semester 
of Foreign Language. 

MINOR IN ETHNIC STUDIES 

Director: Susan Kalter, Department of English 
203 Williams/Stevenson 420E, Campus Box 4240 
(309) 438-8660; smkalte@ilstu.edu 

Website: http://lilt.ilstu.edu/ethnicstudies/ 

Ethnic Studies is the study of race and ethnicity in U.S. 
and transnational contexts. Students and faculty in this area 
examine how social categories like race, indigeneity, culture, 
ethnicity, and nation are conceptualized. They also familiar- 
ize themselves with the specific and comparative experi- 
ences both historical and contemporary of the major 
population groups that make up the United States. The pro- 
gram at Illinois State allows participants to examine region- 
al, national, and global dimensions of these experiences. 

Student in the minor must complete a minimum of 22 
hours representing 8 courses as indicated from Groups I, II, 
and III; at least 4 courses must be above the 100-level; no 
more than 3 courses may be from one department or school. 
Students may use departmental or IDS 287, 298, or 398 
courses for one course in Group II and/or one course in 
Group III. No more than 9 hours applied toward this minor 
may overlap with hours applied toward any other minor. 

Students interested in pursuing a major in this area may 
arrange their program of study through the Interdisciplinary 
Studies Major program. 

Minors are also available in three specific areas: 
African-American Studies; Latin American, Caribbean, and 
Latino/a Studies; and Native American Studies. 

A list of affiliated faculty and more information is avail- 
able on the Ethnic Studies website. 

Group I - Ethnicity (Students must complete 2 courses) 

—ANT 281, 285; C&I 110; COM 272, 372; HIS/SOC 
111; IDS *121.52; POL 334; SOC 264, 366. 



82 



University- Wide Programs 



NOTE: Other courses with appropriate content for Group I 
may be approved by the faculty director. 

Group II - Race and Ethnicity in the United States. 

(Students must complete 4 courses chosen from at least 2 
departments or schools.) 

— ANT 272, 278; C&I 111, 232, 312, 319, 320, 321, 322; 
CJS 308; CSD 375; ECO 230; ENG 165, 265, 266, 365; 
*HIS 104.06, 257, 258; 264, 273, 310; *IDS 121.29, 
♦121.37, *121.40, *121.41; MUS 153, 154; NUR 312; 
PSY 327; SOC 109; SWK 310; THE 154. 

NOTE: Other courses with appropriate content for 
Group II may be approved by the faculty director. 
Courses in non-English U.S. literatures and cultures, 
if appropriate to the minor and the student's focus as 
determined by the faculty director, will be approved. 

Group III - Global Contexts (Students must complete 2 
courses.) 

— ANT 185, 283, 294, 307, 308, 373; ART 275; 
ENG/LAN 206; GEO 235, 250, 255; *HIS 104.01, 
*104.02, *104.03, *104.04, *104.05, 263, 265, 266, 
269, 270, 271, 272, 275, 276, 282, 283, 307, 335, 373, 
375, 378; *IDS 121.02, *121.26, *121.31, *121.42, 
*121.43, 133.02, 133.03, 133.04, 203; LAN (CHI) 
1 15.17; LAN (FR) 314.12, 325.12; LAN (JAP) 115.18, 
116.18; LAN (SPA) 115.15, 116.15, 244.15, 336.15; 
MUS 216, 275; NUR 313; PHI 207, 208; POL 140, 
240, 245, 246, 247, 340, 345, 349; SOC 220; THE 271, 
275.01,275.02,374. 

NOTE: Other courses with appropriate content for 
Group III may be approved by the faculty director. 
Courses in second-year language (and beyond) and 
courses in global English-language or non-English-lan- 
guage literatures and cultures, if appropriate to the 
minor and the student's focus as determined by the fac- 
ulty director, will be approved. 

*NOTE: HIS 104 and IDS 121 may be taken only once each 
for credit. 



MINOR IN INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES 

Program Coordinator: Jim Weinzierl, Department of 

Sociology/Anthropology 

336 Schroeder Hall, Campus Box 4660 

(309) 438-8579, jeweinz@ilstu.edu 

Web address: IDS.IllinoisState.edu 

Illinois State University offers students the opportunity, 
under the Minor in Interdisciplinary Studies, to construct a 
program of study that differs from the University's regular 
minor programs. 

The Individualized Requirements provide an 
Interdisciplinary program that may be used to attain specific 



educational goals that cannot be accommodated by existing 
minors at Illinois State. 

Minor in Interdisciplinary Studies; Individualized 
Sequence Requirements: 

Students who complete the Individualized Sequence will 
have their transcripts noted: "Minor in Interdisciplinary 

Studies: Individualized Sequence: ," (the 

theme that is specified on the plan of study). 

— Approved plan of study from at least 2 academic depart- 
ments/schools containing 18-24 hours. 

— A 3.25 cumulative GPA at the time of application. 

Procedure: 

1. Admission to the Minor in Interdisciplinary Studies 
may be requested after the completion of 15 semester 
hours of course work and before the completion of 75 
semester hours. Applications must be submitted during 
September or February. 

2. Information on the application process is available from 
Jim Weinzierl, 336 Schroeder Hall, Campus Box 4660. 
Applicants should select an appropriate faculty advisor. 
The proposed plan of study must be approved by the 
faculty advisor, the Interdisciplinary Studies Minor 
Committee, and the Office of the Provost. 

3. At least one-half of the course work in the sequence 
must be taken after the proposal has been approved. 
No more than one-sixth of the course work in the 
sequence may be transferred from another institution 
of higher education. 

4. Changes in an approved plan of study must be autho- 
rized in advance. A letter outlining the proposed change, 
and countersigned by the faculty advisor, should be sub- 
mitted to Jim Weinzierl, 336 Schroeder Hall, Campus 
Box 4660. Requests for changes in more than one-sixth 
of the approved program constitute a new proposal and 
must be resubmitted subject to all the conditions of an 
initial application. 



MINOR IN INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

International Studies 

308 Fell Hall, Campus Box 6120 

(309) 438-5365 

Advisor: Allison Anson, Academic Advisement 

369 Fell Hall 

(309) 438-7604; alanson@ilstu.edu 

The Minor in International Studies is an interdisciplinary 
program that is designed to offer students an opportunity to 
take a global perspective on their education. 

The program's features include a background in foreign 
language, a focus on issues related to internationalization or 
globalization of society, a focus on a geographic area of the 
world, and participation in a formal study abroad experience. 



University-Wide Programs 



83 



Academic advisement is essential to this highly individual- 
ized program in order for students to construct programs that 
will fit their individual needs. 

— 24 hours required, including LAN 1 1 5 or equivalent; 
6-12 hours in Category A; 9-15 hours in Category B; 
and participation in a study abroad or alternative inter- 
national experience. 

— Participation is required in a 6-credit hour (or greater) 
study abroad experience sponsored by Illinois State 
University or alternative international experience 
approved prior to participation by the minor advisor. 
Courses taken while studying abroad may be counted 
toward the minor. Contact the International Studies 
Advisor for information on which courses offered in 
each program may be counted toward the minor. 

— Up to 9 hours (excluding courses in Category A) taken 
in the minor may also be applied toward the student's 
major. At least 9 hours of the minor must be at the 200- 
level or above. 

— Additional foreign language study is strongly encour- 
aged. Special emphasis should be placed on developing 
oral communication skills. 

CATEGORY A— International Issues: 

— 6-12 hours required. Courses in the student's first 
major may not count toward category A requirements. 
A maximum of 2 courses from any 1 department or 
school may be taken. Choose from the following: AGR 
201; ANT 175, 185; ART 275; CJS 369; COM 355, 
369, 372; ECO 210, 245, 345; ENG 206, 255, 261; 
GEO 135; HIS 104, 230, 270; IDS 203; INB 190; LAN 
206; POL 140, 150, 151, 251, 252, 254, 255, 344, 351, 
358, 363; SOC 108, 366; THE 271, 275.01, 275.02; 
WGS 120, or other courses approved by the 
International Studies Advisor. 

CATEGORY B— Area Studies: 

— 9-15 hours required. Only courses taken in 1 area listed 
below may be counted toward the minor. Many Illinois 
State University Study Abroad program courses count. 

— In addition to the courses listed below, any pertinent 
course on the history, literature, economic, social, or 
political structures of a foreign country or culture 
may be counted toward the minor, provided it 
receives approval in advance from the International 
Studies advisor. The International Studies advisor 
will help students choose courses appropriate to their 
area studies concentration and career objectives. 

— Latin America: HIS 263; LAN(SPA) 116, 244, 305; 
POL 140, 240, 340. 

— Europe: ART 372, 379; GEO 240; HIS 102, 229, 234, 
237, 366; LAN 116 (FR, GER, ITN, SPA), 217 (GER), 
218 (GER), 243 (SPA), 305 (FR), 305 (SPA); POL 141, 
242,341. 

— Africa: GEO 250, HIS 266; LAN 325; POL 140, 246. 

— South and Southwest Asia (Middle East, India, 
Pakistan, Sri Lanka): GEO 255; HIS 272, 378; PHI 
207, 208; POL 140, 245, 247, 349. 



East Asia: HIS 373, 375; LAN 116 (JPN), PHI 208; 
POL 140, 245, 345. 

NOTE: Please refer to specific departments or schools 
for further course information. 



MINOR IN LATIN AMERICAN, CARIBBEAN, 
AND LATINO/A STUDIES 

Director: Dr. Maura Toro-Morn, 
Department of Sociology arid Anthropology 
361 Schroeder Hall, Campus Box 4660 
(309) 438-8290; LatinoStudies.IllinoisState.edu 

Advisor: Janet Claus, Academic Advisement 
340 Fell Hall, Campus Box 4060 
(309) 438-7604, jlclaus@ilstu.edu 

The goals of the Minor in Latin American, Caribbean, 
and Latino/a Studies are (a) to provide students with key 
concepts, information, and a foundation of knowledge 
rooted in several academic disciplines; (b) to examine the 
social, political, and cultural challenges of Latin America, 
the Caribbean, and the Latino/a populations in the global 
community; and (c) to foster a multi cultural, pluralistic, 
and multi-lingual environment by focusing on the interre- 
lations between the United States, Latin America, the 
Caribbean, and its descendant populations. 

This program is student centered and flexible. Students 
are expected to complete course work in a variety of disci- 
plines and departments. All individual programs of study 
must be planned in consultation with the Latin American, 
Caribbean, and Latino/a Studies advisor. 

— 24 hours required. 

— Language Requirement: Students must complete 6 
semesters of high school or second semester college 
(112) coursework in either Spanish or Portuguese. 
Note: Portuguese is not offered at Illinois State, but 
transfer credit will be accepted. Also, foreign lan- 
guage credit below the third semester level (115) does 
not count toward the minor requirement of 24 hours. 

— A plan of study approved by the advisor including 
courses from at least three of the following groups. 

Group A - Department of Curriculum and 
Instruction (Bilingual Education): C&I 319, 320, 321, 

322. 

Group B - Department of Languages, Literatures, 
and Cultures: LAN (Spanish) 115, 116, 233, 240, 
244, 325, 336. 

Students are strongly encouraged to study abroad in 
the Department of Language, Literatures, and 
Cultures' summer program in Taxco, Mexico and 
other available programs for study in Latin America 
and the Caribbean. See office of International Studies 
and programs for information. 

Group C - Department of Geography and Geology: 

GEO 235.02. 



84 



University -Wide Programs 

Group D - Department of History: HIS 104.03, 263, 
282, 283. 

Group E - Department of Politics and Government: 

POL 240, 336, 340. 



Group F - Departmeni 
Anthropology: SOC 109. 



of Sociology and 



NOTE: Other courses with appropriate content may be 
approved by the advisor, particularly LAN (Spanish) 305, 
360; HIS 306; and IDS 203.15 when topic is Latin America. 

MINOR IN MIDDLE EASTERN AND 
SOUTH ASIAN STUDIES 

Director: Ali Riaz, Department of Politics and Government 
401 Schroeder Hall, Campus Box 4600 
(309) 438-8638, ariaz@ilstu.edu 

Advisor: Erik Rankin 
Department of Politics and Government 
401 Schroeder Hall, Campus Box 4600 
Phone: (309) 438-3709, etranki@ilstu.edu 

The Minor in Middle Eastern and South Asian Studies 
provides an interdisciplinary approach to exploring the poli- 
tics, society, cultures and economics of the countries in the 
Middle East and South Asia. This program is designed to be 
of interest to students who want to explore the socio-politi- 
cal-economic dynamics of the countries located in the 
region and their roles in the world. It also examines the 
impacts of the global politics, especially the US foreign 
policies, on the socio-political environment of this region. 
Students are required to take a core of four courses in histo- 
ry, politics, geography and interdisciplinary studies, as well 
as elective courses in the social sciences (History, 
Sociology, Geography, and Politics and Government), 
and in the humanities and fine arts (English, and 
Languages, Literatures, and Cultures). 

— 2 1 hours required. 

— Required core courses (12 hours): GEO 235.03 or 
235.04; HIS 104.04 or 104.05; IDS 203.20 or 203.25; 
POL 245, 247 or 345. 

— Choose 3 courses (9 hours ) from the following: ECO 
205, 245; ENG 206; GEO 255; HIS 270, 271, 378; 
LAN 206; POL 225, 254, 349; SOC 268. 

— NOTE: No more than 9 hours may be selected from the stu- 
dent's first or second major department. 

Other courses approved by the director may be count- 
ed toward the minor. 

Participation in Middle Eastern or South Asian universi- 
ties through Illinois State University or alternative study 
abroad programs, while not required, is strongly encouraged. 
Students can accumulate up to 6 credit hours of electives. 

NOTE: Please refer to specific departments or schools 
for further course information including prerequisites. 



MINOR IN NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES 

Director: Susan Kalter, Department of English 
Stevenson 424J, Campus Box 4240 
(309) 438-8660; smkalte@ilstu.edu 

Website: lilt.ilstu.edu/nativestudies 

The minor in Native American Studies is designed to 
familiarize students with the histories, literatures, cultures, 
and futures of the indigenous citizens of North America. It 
will be of interest to students who wish to explore the unique 
political and social relationship that the First Nations and 
their members hold with the United States. It provides stu- 
dents with key concepts, information, and a foundation of 
knowledge rooted in several academic disciplines. Faculty 
from the departments of Anthropology, English, History, and 
the School of Theatre participate in this minor. Students are 
required to take an interdisciplinary core of four courses 
from three different departments and Interdisciplinary 
Studies. Two electives from approved offerings by faculty in 
the field of Native American Studies may be selected as 
alternatives to the list of electives below. 

— 1 8 hours required. 

— Required courses: IDS 121.29; ANT 283; ENG 266; 
HIS 104.06 or HIS 310. 

— 6 hours of additional courses from the following: ANT 
272; HIS 104.06, 310 (if not previously taken); IDS 
222/223 (with tribal college; may apply 3 hours toward 
minor); IDS 225 (with tribal college; may apply 3 hours 
toward minor); 287, 298/398 (may be on- or off-cam- 
pus; may apply 3 hours towards the minor) 

NOTE: This program must be planned in consultation 
with the Native American Studies faculty director. With 
director approval, courses other than those listed above 
may be counted toward the minor. 

A list of affiliated faculty and more information is 
available on the Native American Studies website. 
Departments participating in the minor: English, History, 
Sociology/Anthropology, Theatre. 

MINOR IN PEACE AND CONFLICT 
RESOLUTION STUDIES 

Program Director: Michaelene Cox 
Department of Politics and Government 
425 Schroeder Hall, Campus Box 4600 
(309) 438-8923, mcox@ilstu.edu 

Advisor: Janet Claus, Academic Advisement 
340 Fell Hall, Campus Box 4060 
(309) 438-7604; jlclaus@ilstu.edu 

The Minor in Peace and Conflict Resolution Studies is 
an interdisciplinary program that includes courses from 
fourteen departments. 

The Minor provides a comprehensive and in-depth 
approach to peace and conflict resolution theories and 



methods. Students are required to take an introductory 
course, as well as one course from each of five areas of 
inquiry (social justice, conflict resolution, violence, environ- 
ment, and globalization), while also specializing in one of 
these areas with two additional courses. The minor's capstone 
experience is a professional practice. 

The Minor allows students to examine the causes and 
prevention of war, as well as the nature of violence, includ- 
ing social oppression, discrimination and marginalization. 
They also learn peace strategies to overcome persecution 
and transform society to attain a more just and equitable 
international community. The inquiry encompasses micro to 
macro perspectives. At the micro end of the spectrum, stu- 
dents investigate non-violent ethics and conflict manage- 
ment; interpersonal communication and relations; intergroup 
relations; and diversity and gender issues. At the macro 
level, students explore the dynamics of international conflict, 
as well as approaches to peace and world order; ethnic and 
socioeconomic justice; multiculturism; renewable econom- 
ics; and biodiversity. 

— 27-28 hours required. 

— Required core (6 hours): IDS 1 1 1 , 398.0 1 . 

— Choose three courses from one group listed below and 
one course from each remaining group. 

Group A - Social Justice: CJS 102, PHI 238; SOC 

106, 108, 264, 366. 

Group B - Conflict Resolution: FCS/SOC/HIS 112, 

FCS 310, HIS 268; POL 252, 255, 351, 363; SOC/HIS 

111. 

Group C - Violence: CJS 369; IDS 254; PHI 248; POL 

352; SOC 365. 

Group D - Environment: AGR201; BSC 202; HSC 156; 

PHI 236; PHY 207. 

Group E - Globalization: ANT 175; ECO 105; IDS 

203; INB 190; MQM 349; POL 150, 151. 

NOTE: Students are encouraged to consult with the pro- 
gram director and/or advisor regarding course selection and 
information regarding Professional Practice (IDS 398.01). 

Peace and Conflict Resolution Courses 



IDS 



MC-IS 



111 PEACE STUDIES 
3 sem. hrs. 

A general, interdisciplinary introduction to Peace Studies, 
including social justice, conflict resolution, global ecology, 
and education for an interdependent world. Includes 
arranged service learning hours. 

398.01 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE INTERNSHIP 
/COOPERATIVE EDUCATION IN PEACE 
STUDIES AND CONFLICT RESOLUTION 
3-6 sem. hrs. 

Practical experience, preferably in an international, national 
or local organization where peacemaking, conflict resolution 
and skills are required and learned. Prerequisites: IDS 1 1 1 
and Minor in Peace and Conflict Resolution Studies. 



University-Wide Programs 85 

MINOR IN URBAN STUDIES 

Advisor: Alan Lessoff, Department of History 
301 Schroeder Hall, Campus Box 4420 
(309) 438-8083, ahlesso@ilstu.edu 

The Minor in Urban Studies is an interdisciplinary 
minor sponsored by the Departments of Economics, 
Geography-Geology, History, Politics and Government, 
and Sociology-Anthropology. The program is designed to 
help students focus on the study of urban places from a 
social science perspective, and should be of interest to 
those who want to pursue careers in urban related areas 
such as politics, planning or community development, or to 
those who wish to pursue graduate study in these areas. 

The program's features include required course work in 
urban geography, history, political science and sociology, 
and in applied research or analytical techniques. Students 
may choose from a range of elective courses, independent 
study with urban studies faculty, and an optional internship. 

— 21 hours required. 

— Required core (12 hours): GEO 336, HIS 322, 
POL 221 or 222, SOC 240 or 361. 

— Required Methods (3 hours): ECO 238 or GEO 
204 or HIS 200 or POL 209 or SOC 27 1 . 

— Choose 6 elective hours from the following: GEO 303, 
GEO 370, HIS 256, SOC 362, or any core course not 
taken to fulfill the core requirement. Independent Study 
courses for up to three hours and 
approved in advance by the Urban Studies 
advisor also may be used for elective credit. 

— Optional Internship (in addition to the 21 
required hours) must be coordinated with the Urban 
Studies advisor. 

— Up to 6 hours taken in the minor may also be applied 
toward the student's major. 

NOTE: This program must be planned in consultation with 
the Urban Studies advisor. Some courses carry prerequisites 
that require planning on the part of the student. In addition, 
the Advisor can assist students in tailoring the program to 
meet their individual interests. 

MINOR IN WOMEN'S AND 

GENDER STUDIES (WGS) 426 

Director: Alison Bailey 

237 Rachel Cooper, Campus Box 4260 

(309)438-2947 

Web address: WomensAndGenderStudies.ilstu.edu 

The minor in Women's and Gender Studies enhances 
any undergraduate major by integrating a working knowl- 
edge of gender issues with the student's field(s) of study. 
Women's and Gender Studies employs gender as an analyti- 
cal category, along with race, class, and ethnicity, to focus on 
women's contributions to society and the gendered implica- 



86 



University-Wide Programs 



tions of cultural, political, and economic processes. By 
broadening a student's knowledge base, this interdisciplinary 
minor has theoretical and practical applications for scholar- 
ship, the workplace, personal growth and relationships. 

— 2 1 hours required. 

- Required courses: WGS 120; ENG 160; HIS 261 or HIS 
262; PHI 246. 

— 9 hours of additional courses from: ANT 270; CJS 339; 
COM 128 or ENG 128 or LAN 128; ENG 206 or LAN 
206; ECO 230; ENG 260, 261, 360; FCS 112 or HIS 
112 or SOC 112; FCS 222, 233, 327; HIS 261 or HIS 
262 if not chosen to fulfill requirement, HIS 264, 330; 
IDS 121.39; PHI 202; POL 225, 337, 338; PSY 123 or 
SOC 123; PSY 305; SOC 264, 265, 341, 342, 366; 
WGS 390, 391, 392, 398. 

NOTE: This program must be planned in consultation with 
the Women's and Gender Studies director or advisor. With 
their approval courses other than those listed above may be 
counted toward the minor. 

Social Work Concentration in Women's and Gender 
Studies: This 12-hour concentration has been designed for 
social work majors who wish to integrate a working knowl- 
edge of gender issues and their intersections with the under- 
graduate BSW degree. SWK 329 pre-practicum must be with 
an organization focusing on gender issues. 

Women's and Gender Studies Courses 



398 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 
INTERNSHIP IN WOMEN'S 
AND GENDER STUDIES 
1-6 sem. hrs. 

Supervised work experience in local, state, national, or inter- 
national businesses, agencies, institutions, or organizations 
focusing on women's or gender issues. May be repeated; 
maximum 6 hours. Formerly PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE 
INTERNSHIP IN WOMEN'S STUDIES Prerequisites: 6 
hours of Women's and Gender Studies and consent of 
Director of Women's and Gender Studies. 



INTERDISCIPLINARY 

STUDIES (IDS) 604 

Director: Sally Parry, Associate Dean 

College of Arts and Sciences 

141 Stevenson Hall, Campus Box 4100 

(309)438-5669 

University-Wide Courses 

These courses may be offered by any department or 
school of the University. For specific departmental offerings 
contact the department or school advisor or visit the 
University Website at IllinoisState.edu. 



120 WOMEN, GENDER AND SOCIETY MC-IS 

3 sem. hrs. 

How systems of gender shape societies around the world; 
how individual and collective actions transform the gender 
system of a society. May not be taken under the CT/NC 
option. Formerly IDS/WS 120, INTRODUCTION TO 
WOMEN'S STUDIES Prerequisites: ENG 101 or COM 110 
or concurrent registration. 

390 INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH 

IN WOMEN'S AND GENDER STUDIES 
1-6 sem. hrs. 

Students will research and write on an interdisciplinary topic 
of their choice relevant to Women's and Gender Studies. 
Formerly INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH IN 
WOMEN'S STUDIES. Prerequisites: A detailed proposal 
approved by the Director of Women's and Gender Studies 
and signed by 2 faculty advisors from different disciplines 
required prior to registration. 

391 WOMEN'S AND GENDER STUDIES SEMINAR 
1-3 sem. hrs. 

Intensive and critical examination of selected topics in 
women's and gender studies. May be repeated; maximum 6 
hours. Formerly WOMEN'S STUDIES SEMINAR. 

392 LESBIAN, GAY, BISEXUAL, TRANSGENDER/ 
QUEER STUDIES AND THEORY 

3 sem. hrs. 

Research in the interdisciplinary field of LGBT/Queer 
Studies, emphasizing how queer theory informs a variety of 
academic disciplines and discourses. Prerequisites: WGS 
120 or consent of instructor. 



189, 289, 389 SELECTED STUDIES 
1-6 sem. hrs. 

Experimental and interdepartmental courses providing con- 
tent not offered within the framework of courses approved 
for inclusion in the Undergraduate Catalog. For descriptions 
of the courses offered each semester contact the department 
or school advisor or visit the University Website at 
IllinoisState.edu. 

193, 293, 393 WORKSHOP 
1-6 sem. hrs. 

Workshop opportunities are provided for the purpose of per- 
mitting students to work on special problems not covered in 
any one course offered by the University. Topics for investiga- 
tion by workshop participants are limited to areas in which the 
University is able to provide adequate workshop staff. 
Maximum of 6 hours may be applied toward graduation. 

198, 298, 398 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE 
1-16 sem. hrs. 

Supervised work experiences in local, state, national, and 
international businesses, agencies, institutions, and orga- 
nizations which are planned, administered, and super- 
vised at the departmental level. University-wide 
coordination is provided through Professional Practice in 
Student and Alumni Placement Services or through the 
Office of Clinical Experiences if the experience is in an 
educational agency or institution. Maximum of 16 hours 
may be applied toward graduation. Prerequisite: Consent 
department chair/school director. 



University-Wide Programs 



87 



287 INDEPENDENT STUDY 
1-6 sem. hrs. 

Intensive work in a special area of the student's interest. 
Each individual project is to culminate in a comprehensive 
written report or examination. Open only to students who 
are not on academic probation and who have demonstrated 
an ability to profit from independent study. Maximum of 6 
hours may be applied toward graduation. Prerequisites: 
Consent department chair/school director and supervisor. 

291 SEMINAR: UNDERGRADUATE 
TEACHING ASSISTANTS 
1-3 sem. hrs. 

Supervised examination of issues related to the 
Undergraduate Teaching Experience. Seminar requires 
time beyond the UTA work experience. Maximum of 3 
hours may be applied toward graduation. Prerequisites: 
Official designation as an Undergraduate Teaching Assistant 
(UTA). Consent department chair/school director. 

299 INDEPENDENT HONOR STUDY 
1-6 sem. hrs. 

Intensive work in a special area of the student's major or 
minor. Each individual project is to culminate in a compre- 
hensive written report or examination. Maximum of 6 hours 
may be applied toward graduation. Prerequisites: Open only 
to students who have achieved superior academic records 
and who have demonstrated an ability to profit from inde- 
pendent study. Consent instructor, department chair or 
school director, and Director of Honors. 

397 INSTITUTE 
1-9 sem. hrs. 

Federal- and state-sponsored institutes or similar short-term 
programs requiring treatment of subject matter of a special 
nature or for special groups. 

399 STUDENT TEACHING 
1-16 sem. hrs. 

Directing the learning of pupils; participating in school and 
community activities; assuming full responsibility for a 
group of learners under the supervision of an expert teacher. 
Assignments are made on the basis of the student's area of 
specialization. The student's transcript indicates the area in 
which student teaching was completed. Prerequisites: 2.50 
cumulative GPA required. Approval of department chair or 
school director and the Director of CECP. 15 hours of course 
work or equivalent at Illinois State. All requirements for 
Admission to Student Teaching must be met by December 
15 for student teaching during the spring semester and by 
July 15 for student teaching during the fall semester. 

High school teaching (6-12): Prerequisites: PSY 215 or 
C&I 210; C&I 212, 214, and 216 and a minimum of 100 
clock hours of approved pre-student teaching Clinical 
Experiences. 

Special Areas (K-12): Prerequisites: PSY 215 or C&I 210; 
C&I 212, 214, and 216, and a minimum of 100 clock hours 
of approved pre-student teaching Clinical Experiences in K- 
12 sites. 

Middle Level Teacher Education (K-9): Prerequisites: 
C&I 390, minimum of 100 hours of approved pre-student 
teaching Clinical Experiences, completion of Field of 
Study required prerequisite for student teaching in areas 
of concentration. 



Early Childhood Education (Age 0-Grade 3): 

Prerequisites: C&I 283, minimum of 100 clock hours of 
approved pre-student teaching Clinical Experiences. 

Elementary Education (K-9): Prerequisites: C&I 211, 257, 
258; minimum of 100 clock hours of approved pre-student 
teaching Clinical Experiences. 

Special Education (K-12): Prerequisites: Specific courses 
are required in each sequence. See listing of requirements in 
individual Special Education sequence. All sequences 
require the completion of a minimum of 100 clock hours of 
approved pre-student teaching Clinical Experiences. 

Other requirements as listed in the University-Wide 
Teacher Education section of this Undergraduate Catalog. 



Honors Courses 

102 HONORS COLLOQUIUM 
1-4 sem. hrs. 

Interdisciplinary, for students in the Honors Program. 
Weekly sessions, presented by one or more specialists on the 
topic, explore a semester theme. May be repeated once for 
credit if topic is different. Materials charge optional for 
Presidential Scholars Freshman Colloquium. 

202 ADVANCED HONORS COLLOQUIUM 
3 sem. hrs. 

Weekly sessions presented by a specialist dealing with a 
semester's topic for advanced students in the Honors Program. 
May be repeated once if topic is different. Prerequisites: 
Junior standing or consent Honors Director. 

225 NATIONAL COLLEGIATE 
HONORS EXCHANGE 
1-6 sem. hrs. 

Honors study for one semester at another university. 
Prerequisite: Participation in Illinois State Honors 
Program. 

285 HONORS UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH 
1-3 sem. hrs. 

Honors student assists a faculty member on the faculty mem- 
ber's research project. May be repeated. Prerequisite: 
Consent Honors Director required. 

286 HONORS UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH II 
1-3 sem. hrs. 

Continuation of IDS 285. May be repeated. Prerequisite: 
IDS 285. 

299 INDEPENDENT HONOR STUDY 
1-6 sem. hrs. 

Intensive work in a special area of the student's major or 
minor. Each individual project is to culminate in a compre- 
hensive written report or examination. Maximum of 6 
hours may be applied toward graduation. Limit of 9 hours 
IDS 299 and 395 combined may count toward graduation. 
Prerequisites: Consent instructor, department chair or 
school director, and Director of Honors. Open only to stu- 
dents in the Honors Program who have achieved superior 
academic records and who have demonstrated an ability to 
profit from independent study. 



88 



University-Wide Programs 



395 HONORS THESIS 
1-6 sem. hrs. 

Intensive research in a special area of the student's major. 
Each individual project is to culminate in a comprehensive 
written thesis and an oral defense of the thesis. Maximum of 
6 hours may be applied toward graduation. Limit of 9 hours 
of IDS 299 and 395 combined may count toward graduation. 
Prerequisites: Consent instructor, department chair or school 
director, and Director of Honors. Open only to students in 
the Honors Program who have achieved superior academic 
records and who have demonstrated an ability to profit from 
independent study. 

Interdisciplinary Studies Courses 

106 CAREER CHOICE 
1 sem. hr. 

Introduction to theory of career decision making. Laboratory 
in the application of skills and strategies to individual career 
choices. Appropriate for freshmen and sophomores. CR/NC 
only. Materials charge optional. 

Ill PEACE STUDIES MC-IS 

3 sem. hrs. 

A general, interdisciplinary introduction to Peace Studies, 
including social justice, conflict resolution, global ecology, 
and education for an interdependent world. Includes 
arranged service learning hours. 

121 TEXTS AND CONTEXTS MC-LH 
3 sem. hrs. 

Interdisciplinary writing-intensive course focusing on 
significant humanities texts in relationship to their histor- 
ical and cultural contexts. May not be taken under the 
CT/NC option. Prerequisite: ENG 101; COM 110 or 
concurrent registration. 

122 FIRST YEAR LEARNING IN 
COMMUNITIES SEMINAR 

1 sem. hr. 

A seminar to assist first-semester students in their transi- 
tion to the University, including exploration of majors, 
minors, and careers and opportunities for engagement in 
university and civic life. Formerly IDS 189.95. 



207 REPRESENTATION KNOWLEDGE 

AND POWER OC-H 

3 sem. hrs. 

Theory, practice, and history of the use of representational 
signs — language, images, sounds, etc. — to communicate 
knowledge about the world and to exercise power. 
Prerequisites: ENG 101; COM 1 10; MC-LH category 

254 RELIGIONS AND CULTURES MC-LH 

3 sem. hrs. 

A critical examination of diverse religious discourses and lit- 
eracies and how they construct and reflect identity based on 
cultural differences. May not be taken under the CT/NC 
option. Prerequisites: ENG 101; COM 110 or concurrent 
registration. 

265 INTRODUCTION TO COGNITIVE 
SCIENCE: COMPUTERS, MINDS, 
BRAINS, AND ROBOTS 
3 sem. hrs. OC-SMT 

Explores fundamental principles from Psychology, Computer 
Science, Philosophy, Linguistics, Biology, that contribute to 
the scientific study of intelligent systems (minds). 
Prerequisites: Inner Core; MC-QR category or one semester 
of Foreign Language. 

298 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: INTERNSHIP 
/COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 
1-6 sem. hrs. 

Interdisciplinary directed project or on-the-job experience 
related to student's career interests under the supervision of 
internship coordinator or faculty of one or more departments. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

398.01 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE INTERNSHIP/ 
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION OR CO-OP 
IN PEACE STUDIES AND CONFLICT 
RESOLUTION 
3-6 sem. hrs. 
Practical experience, preferably in an international, national 
or local organization where peacemaking conflict resolution 
skills are required and learned. Prerequisites: IDS 1 1 1 and 
Minor in Peace and Conflict Resolution Studies. 



125 FOUNDATIONS OF CITIZENSHIP: AN 

INTRODUCTION TO CIVIC RESPONSIBILITY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Designed to enhance students' basic knowledge, understand- 
ing, and skills in active citizenship and civic responsibility 
through introductory concepts and applied elements of civic 
engagement. Prerequisites: COM 1 10; ENG 101. 

133 INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDY ABROAD 
1-6 sem. hrs. 

Study abroad. Specific topics and regions as approved and 
indicated by decimal and extended title. Formerly IDS 189. 
May repeat if content differs. 



398.02 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: SERVICE 
LEARNING EXPERIENCE IN CIVIC 
ENGAGEMENT 

3 sem. hrs. 

This capstone course provides the opportunity to integrate 
academic study with service learning by having supervised, 
practical experience in a professional environment that 
focuses on civic responsibility. Prerequisites: Minor in Civic 
Engagement and Responsibility. 



203 NATIONS AND NARRATIONS OC-H 

3 sem. hrs. 

Construction of national identities from cultural, philosophical, 
religious, and political empires using narrative discourse as a 
lens. Topics vary from one section to another. Prerequisites: 
ENG 101; COM 1 10; MC-LH or MC-UST category. 



89 



COLLEGE OF APPLIED SCIENCE 
AND TECHNOLOGY 



Dean: Jeffrey A. Wood, 143 Turner Hall. 
Associate Deans: Alan Lacy, Todd McLoda 
Assistant Dean: Lori Woeste 

The College of Applied Science and Technology is 
home to six departments and two schools that offer pro- 
grams to prepare students for professional and technical 
positions in education, government, business, and industry. 
Five departments in the College also offer teacher prepara- 
tion programs. Faculty in the College are dedicated to the 
personal and academic development of their students as 
well as the discovery and application of theoretical knowl- 
edge and the advancement of professional practice in their 
respective areas. This is accomplished through a dynamic 
partnership of interdisciplinary learning, scholarship, and 
service that is built on a collaboration among students, fac- 
ulty, and members of the professional community. 

The Departments of Agriculture; Criminal Justice Sci- 
ences; Family and Consumer Sciences; Health Sciences; 
Military Science; and Technology are in the College. The 
Schools of Information Technology and Kinesiology and 
Recreation are also located in the College. 

The College offers graduate programs in six units 
including Agriculture; Criminal Justice Sciences; Family 
and Consumer Sciences; Information Technology; Kinesi- 
ology and Recreation; and Technology. Descriptions and 
requirements of these programs may be found in the Grad- 
uate Catalog. 



AGRICULTURE (AGR) 



502 



125 Ropp Agriculture Building, Phone: (309) 438-5654 
Fax: (309) 438-5653 

Web address: Agriculture.IllinoisState.edu 
Email address: isuagr@ilstu.edu 

Chairperson: Robert Rhykerd. 

Tenured/Tenure-track Faculty: 

Professors: O'Rourke, Rhykerd, Smiciklas, Tudor, Walker, 

Whitacre, Winter, Wood. 

Associate Professors: Moore, Spaulding, Steffen. 

Assistant Professors: Holt, Kopsell. 

General Department Information 

HONORS IN AGRICULTURE 

Departmental Honors in Agriculture is available to qual- 
ified juniors and seniors. The student completing the Honors 
Program graduation requirements will graduate "with Hon- 
ors in Agriculture," which will be indicated on the student's 
official transcript and diploma. Admission to the Honors 



Program in Agriculture requires a minimum of sixty (60) 
semester hours of post-secondary courses with a cumulative 
grade point average of 3.50 or higher on a 4.00 scale. In 
order to graduate as an Honors Graduate in Agriculture, a 
student must fulfill the general requirements for participa- 
tion in the University Honors Program. Students must also 
have a cumulative grade point average of 3.50 or higher; a 
cumulative grade point of 3.70 or higher for all courses 
taken in the Department of Agriculture; successfully com- 
pleted two in-course honors in 200-level or higher courses 
in the student's technical area; successfully completed one 
in-course honors course in a 200-level or higher course 
offered outside the Department of Agriculture; and suc- 
cessfully completed a minimum of three credit hours of 
AGR 299, Independent Study. The Department of Agricul- 
ture offers in-course honors work in all its courses for stu- 
dents enrolled in the University Honors Program or in any 
departmental honors program. In-course work is offered at 
the discretion of the instructor. 

Agriculture Program 

Degree Offered: B.S. 
MAJOR IN AGRICULTURE 

Agribusiness Sequence: 

— 36 hours in Agriculture and 19 hours in the College of 
Business and/or Department of Economics. 

— Required courses: ACC 131; AGR 109, 110; CHE 110 
and 1 12, or 140; ECO 105; MAT 120. (21-22 hours) 

— Choose four courses from AGR 120, 130, 150, 157, 
170, 205. (12-14 hours) 

— The student must complete a minimum of 12 semester 
hours (within the 36 required in Agriculture) in Agribusi- 
ness courses selected from AGR 213, 214, 215, 216, 310, 
311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 317, 318, 319, 320, 324. 

— AGR 295, 394, and 395 do not count toward this major. 

— Non-business majors who desire to elect more than 30 
hours of their course work in business must meet all 
College of Business requirements for graduation. These 
students should register for additional courses only in 
person and with the written permission of the College of 
Business advisor. 

Agriculture Communication and Leadership Sequence: 

— 36 hours in Agriculture and 1 8 hours in Communication. 

— Required Agriculture courses: AGR 109, 110, 120, 130, 
150, 170, 190,205. (24 hours) 

— Additional required courses: COM 111 and 297. (6 
hours) 

— Select one course from: AGR 319; C&I 212; EAF 228, 
231,235. (2-3 hours) 

— Select 3 hours from AGR 295 or 398. 




90 Agriculture 

Agronomy Management Sequence: 

— 55 hours in Agriculture required. 

— Required Agriculture courses: AGR 109, 150, 157, 234, 
272, 305, 357, and choose one from 1 10 or 170. (28 
hours) 

— 1 5 hours of senior level Agribusiness courses. 

— 1 2 hours of Agronomy electives. 

— Additional required courses: BSC 101 or 196 or 197; 
CHE 102, or 1 10 and 1 12, or 140 and 141. (6-12 hours) 

Animal Industry Management Sequence: 

— 55 hours in Agriculture required. 

— Required Agriculture courses: AGR 109, 170, 173.01 or 
173.02, 272, 275, 282, 283, 286; combination of 380 
and one from 381.01 or 381.02 or 381.03 or 398 (2 
hours); and choose one from 110, 120, 130, 150 or 157. 
(32-33 hours) 

— 8 hours of Animal Science electives. 

— 1 5 hours of Agribusiness electives. 

— Additional required courses: BSC 101 or 196 or 197; 
CHE 102, or 110 and 112, or 140 and 141. (6-12 hours) 

Animal Science Sequence: 

— 36 hours in Agriculture required. 

— Required Agriculture courses: AGR 109, 170, 173.01 or 
173.02, 272, 275, 282, 283, 286; combination of 380 
and one from 381.01 or 381.02 or 381.03 or 398 (2 
hours); and choose one from 110, 120, 130, 150, or 157. 
(32-33 hours) 

— 4 hours of Animal Science electives. 

— Additional required courses: BSC 196 or 197; CHE 
1 10 and 1 12, or 140 and 141; CHE 220 or 230 and 
231; and CHE 242 or 342; MAT 120 or 144 or 145. 
(20-24 hours) 

Crop and Soil Science Sequence: 

— 37 hours in Agriculture required. 

— Required Agriculture courses: AGR 109, 150, 157, 234, 
272, 305, 357, and choose one from 110 or 170. (28 
hours) 

— 9 hours of Agronomy electives. 

- Additional required courses: BSC 196 or 197; CHE 110 
and 112, or 140 and 141; CHE 220, or 230 and 231; and 
CHE 242 or 342; MAT 120 or 144 or 145. (20-24 
hours) 

Food Industry Management Sequence: 

— 36 hours in Agriculture and/or Family and Consumer 
Sciences and 19 hours in the College of Business and/or 
Department of Economics. 

- Required courses: ACC 131; AGR 109, 110, 271, 315, 
317; AGR 205 or ITK 150; CHE 1 10 and 1 12, or 140; 
ECO 105; ECO 138 or MQM 100; FIL 185; MKT 230; 
MAT 120. (42-43 hours) 

- Choose one course from AGR 120, 130, 150, 170 

(3-4 hours) 



— 15 hours from AGR 214, 215, 257, 285, 314, 319, 324, 
340; FCS 102,113,213,316,319,332. 

— AGR 295, 394, and 395 do not count toward this 
sequence. 

Horticulture and Landscape Management Sequence: 

— 36 hours in Agriculture and 19 hours in the College of 
Business and/or Department of Economics. 

— Required courses: AGR 109, 110, 120, 130, 157; AGR 
150 or BSC 196 or 197 (AGR 150 preferred); ECO 105; 
ACC 131; FIL 185; MAT 120; CHE 1 10 and 1 12, or 140. 
(38-39 hours) 

— 12 hours from AGR 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 257, 260, 
262,352,353,355,356. 

— AGR 295, 394, and 395 do not count toward this 
sequence. 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sequence: 

— 36 hours in Agriculture required. 

— Required Agriculture courses: AGR 109, 170, 173.01 or 
173.02, 272, 275, 282, 283, 286; combination of 380 
and one from 381.01 or 381.02 or 381.03 or 398 (2 
hours); and choose one from 110, 120, 130, 150, 157. 
(32-33 hours) 

— 4 hours of Animal Science electives. 

— Additional required courses: BSC 196 and 197; CHE 
140, 141, 230, 231, and 242 or 342; MAT 144 or 145; 
PHY 108 and 109, or 1 10 and 1 1 1. (35-37 hours) 

Agriculture Education Sequence: 

All Agriculture Education students planning to become 
certified teachers must apply for and be admitted to the Uni- 
versity Professional Studies program (see Professional 
Studies Admission-Retention program section of this 
Undergraduate Catalog). A cumulative 2.50 GPA and 
2.50 GPA in the major are required for admission and 
retention in the sequence. Students are encouraged to con- 
sider a second certification in an academic area such as 
Biological Sciences, Chemistry or Mathematics. 

— 55 hours in Agriculture required. 

- Required Agriculture courses: AGR 109, 110, 120, 130, 
150, 157, 170, 190, 205, 214, 231, 275, 295, 394, 395. 
(46 hours) 

— Additional required courses: BSC 196 or 197 (196 pre- 
ferred); CHE 1 10 and 1 12, or 140. (8-9 hours) 

— Professional Education requirements: EAF 228 or 23 1 
or 235; PSY 215; C&I 212, 214, and 216. (14 hours) 

— A minimum of 100 clock hours of approved pre-student 
teaching clinical experiences; and Student Teaching 399 
(10 hours). All Professional Education courses must be 
passed with a grade of C or higher. Program leads to 
certification: Secondary 6-12. 

CLINICAL EXPERIENCES IN TEACHER EDUCATION 

Clinical Experiences are provided in off-campus clini- 
cal teaching centers, in local schools and in campus labora- 
tory schools, in agencies and other approved non-school 
settings. All students will show verification of having com- 



Agriculture 



91 



pleted pre-student teaching field experiences commensu- 
rate with attaining local, state, and national standards. Stu- 
dents must provide their own transportation to Clinical 
Experience sites. 

The approximate number of clinical hours and type of 
activity associated with each course offering can be found 
with the appropriate course description. The following leg- 
end relates to the type and kind of activity related to a specif- 



ic course. 


Clinical Experiences Legend 


1. 


Observation 


2. 


Tutoring one-on-one contact 


3. 


Non-instruction assisting 


4. 

5. 
6. 


Instructional aiding a group 
Micro teaching 
Simulation lab exercises 


7. 


Work with clinic client 


8. 
9. 


Graduate practicum 
Professional meeting 


10 


Other 



MINOR IN AGRICULTURE 

— 24 hours in Agriculture required. 

— Required courses: AGR 109, two 100-level Agriculture 
courses. 



Agriculture Courses 



In meeting program requirements in the Department 
of Agriculture, the student should note that the courses are 
considered in areas, as follows: 

General courses: 109, 198, 201, 203, 205, 302, 303, 398. 

Agribusiness: 110, 213, 214, 215, 216, 3 10, 31 1, 312, 

313, 314, 315, 317, 318, 319, 320, 324. 

Agricultural Education: 190, 295, 394, 395. 

Agricultural Engineering Technology: 130, 225, 

231, 232, 234, 235, 304, 340, 383. 

Agronomy: 150, 157, 272, 305, 306, 352, 355, 357, 363. 

Animal Science: 170, 173.01, 173.02, 271, 272, 275, 

280, 282, 283, 285, 286, 288, 363, 372, 375, 380, 381.01, 

381.02,381.03,386. 

Horticulture and Landscape Management: 120, 150, 

157, 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 257, 260, 262, 352, 353, 

355,356. 

109 INTRODUCTION TO THE 
AGRICULTURAL INDUSTRY 

3 sem. hr. 

Study of the agriculture programs within the department and 
career opportunities in agriculture. 

110 INTRODUCTORY AGRICULTURAL 
ECONOMICS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Fundamental principles of economics applied to agricul- 
ture, agriculture finance, prices, taxation, marketing, and 
land use. 



120 INTRODUCTORY HORTICULTURE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to principles and practices in development, pro- 
duction, and use of horticultural crops (fruits, vegetables, 
greenhouse, floral, turf, nursery, and landscape). Materials 
charge optional. 

130 INTRODUCTION TO AGRICULTURAL 
ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 

3 sem. hrs. 

Place of mechanics in agriculture. Examples, problems, 
discussions, and laboratory exercises in present and 
future mechanics applications. Lecture and lab. Materials 
charge optional. 

150 PRINCIPLES OF AGRONOMY 

4 sem. hrs. 

Fundamentals of plant science; importance, classification, 
distribution, and production practices of the major crops of 
the world. Lecture and lab. 

157 SOIL SCIENCE 
4 sem. hrs. 

Origin and formation, physical and chemical properties, 
moisture relationships, liming and fertilizing soils. Chemical 
and physical tests of soils. Lecture and lab. Prerequisites: 
CHE 102 or 1 10 or 140 or equivalent. 

170 INTRODUCTION TO ANIMAL SCIENCE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Breeding, selection, genetics, nutrition, physiology, and pro- 
duction of farm and companion animals. Fundamentals of 
animal science. Lecture. 

173.01 INTRODUCTION TO ANIMAL SCIENCE 
LABORATORY: FARM ANIMALS 

2 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to and study of skills required in livestock pro- 
duction and the different methods and tools to perform these 
skills. Lab. Not for credit if had AGR 284 LIVESTOCK PRO- 
DUCTION SKILLS. Prerequisite: AGR 170 or concurrent 
registration. 

173.02 INTRODUCTION TO ANIMAL SCIENCE 
LABORATORY: COMPANION ANIMALS 

2 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to and study of skills required in companion 
animal care and the different methods available to provide 
appropriate care. Lab. Prerequisite: AGR 170 or concurrent 
registration. 

190 INTRODUCTION TO AGRICULTURAL 
EDUCATION 
2 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to agricultural teaching profession, overview 
of the total agricultural program, philosophical base of edu- 
cation process, and teaching special-need students. Includes 
Clinical Experience: 10 hours, Type 1, 5, 6. 

198 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 
FARM INTERNSHIP 
1-6 sem. hrs. 

Experience in basic agricultural operations. CR/NC only. 
Prerequisites: Major only. Approved application required. 
Minimum 45 hours experience/hours credit. 




92 



Agriculture 




201 RESOURCES, FOOD, AND SOCIETY: 

A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE MC-IS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Food and fiber production and distribution problems, poli- 
cies, and processes analyzed within social, economic, politi- 
cal, and cultural contexts of societies. May not be taken 
under the CT/NC option. Prerequisites: ENG 101 or COM 
1 1 or concurrent registration required. 

203 AGRICULTURE AND THE 

ENVIRONMENT OC-SMT 

3 sem. hrs. 

Examination of contemporary environmental issues that are 
strongly linked to current and past agricultural practices. 
Prerequisites: Inner Core and MC-IS category required. 

205 MICROCOMPUTER APPLICATIONS 
IN AGRICULTURE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to microcomputer applications specific to 
agriculture. Prerequisite: AGR 1 10 recommended. 

213 FARM MANAGEMENT 
3 sem. hrs. 

Factors of production, such as equipment, labor distribu- 
tion, cropping systems, and soils; organization and opera- 
tion; types of farming. 

214 AGRICULTURE MARKETING 
3 sem. hrs. 

Markets, price-making forces, reasons for existing prac- 
tices, marketing services, and cooperative marketing. 

215 FARM SUPPLY AND FOOD 
INDUSTRY MANAGEMENT 
3 sem. hrs. 

Tools for profitable management of corporate and propri- 
etary farm supply and food industry agribusinesses. Prereq- 
uisites: ACC 13 1 or AGR 216 or consent instructor required. 

216 FARM ACCOUNTING 
3 sem. hrs. 

Standard farm business accounting methods and proce- 
dures, financial measures of success, inventories, deprecia- 
tion, net worth, income tax, budgeting and cash flow, and 
business analysis. 

225 RENEWABLE ENERGY AND 
AGRICULTURE 

3 sem. hrs. 

Explores the relationships between renewable energy and 
agriculture with emphasis on biofuels, wind energy and 
hydropower. Prerequisites: AGR 1 10 or ECO 105. 

23 1 MANAGING AND TEACHING IN 

AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNOLOGY 

LABORATORIES 

3 sem. hrs. 

Principles, methods and skills involved in managing and 
teaching in agricultural and technology laboratories. Lec- 
ture and lab. Materials charge optional. Formerly AGRI- 
CULTURAL CONSTRUCTION AND MAIN-TENANCE. 
Prerequisite: AGR 130 or consent of instructor. 



232 AGRICULTURAL AND HORTICULTURAL 
MACHINERY SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT 

3 sem. hrs. 

Principles of power and machinery operation. Calibration, 
management and use of common agricultural and horticul- 
tural machine systems. Lecture and lab. Materials fee 
optional. Formerly AGRICULTURAL POWER UNITS 
AND MACHINERY. 

234 SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION 

3 sem. hrs. 

Drainage, soil erosion control, water conservation on farms; 
planning, materials, construction, repair, and adaptation of 
structures to farm needs. Lecture, lab, and field trips. 

235 AGRICULTURAL AND HORTICULTURAL 
STRUCTURES AND ENVIRONMENTAL 
SYSTEMS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Principles of design, selection, and management of structur- 
al, utility, and HVAC systems used in agricultural and horti- 
cultural production and processing. Lecture and lab. 
Materials charge optional. Formerly FARM UTILITIES. 

252 URBAN LANDSCAPE MANAGEMENT 
3 sem. hrs. 

Cultural practices and principles in the selection and care of 
ornamental plants for landscape and garden use. Introduction 
to landscape design and maintenance. Lecture and lab. 
Offered even-numbered years. Formerly LANDSCAPE MAN- 
AGEMENT. Prerequisites: AGR 150 and 157 or consent 
instructor required. 

253 FLORAL DESIGN 
3 sem. hrs. 

Principles and practice in the design of floral arrange- 
ments. Introduction to the operation of retail florist busi- 
nesses. Lectures and practice in floral designing. 
Materials charge optional. 

254 HERBACEOUS PLANT MATERIAL 

3 sem. hrs. 

Identification, selection, use, and management of annuals, 
perennials and ornamental grasses in the landscape. Lec- 
ture and lab. Field trip. Offered even-numbered years in the 
spring. Materials charge optional. Prerequisite: AGR 120. 

255 LANDSCAPE PLANTS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Identification and landscape value of ornamental trees, 
shrubs, vines, and ground cover. Intensive field study sup- 
plemented by lectures. Offered odd-numbered years. 

256 LANDSCAPE PLANTS II 
3 sem. hrs. 

Continuation of AGR 255. Identification and landscape 
value of additional species of ornamental trees, shrubs, 
vines, and groundcovers. Intensive field study; lecture. Pre- 
requisite: AGR 255. 

257 FRUIT AND VEGETABLE PRODUCTION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Horticultural food crop identification, production and cul- 
tural requirements. Introduction to quality determinations, 
pest control and marketing. Lecture and lab. Field trip. 
Materials charge optional. Prerequisite: AGR 120. 



Agriculture 



93 



260 GREENHOUSE OPERATION AND MANAGEMENT 
3 sem. hrs. 

Commercial greenhouse operation and management; growth 
media, temperature and light factors, irrigation, fertilization, 
growth regulation and pest control programs. Lectures and 
greenhouse practices. Offered odd-numbered years. Materials 
charge optional. Prerequisites: AGR 157 and either BSC 196 
or 197 or AGR 150 or equivalent. 

262 NURSERY MANAGEMENT 
3 sem. hrs. 

Commercial nursery production and management includ- 
ing: nursery site selection; nursery development, container 
and field stock; nursery facilities and equipment require- 
ments. Lecture and lab. Field trip required. Offered even- 
numbered years. Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: 
AGR 120 or 150. 

271 FOODS OF ANIMAL ORIGIN 
3 sem. hrs. 

Concepts of food-animal products (meat, dairy, eggs) 
including their nutritive value, packaging, marketing chain, 
and value-added technology. Lecture and lab. Prerequisites: 
CHE 110, 112, or 140, 141. 

272 AGRICULTURAL GENETICS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Heredity, variation, and development of domesticated plants 
and animals. Mendelian genetics, mutations, linkage, quanti- 
tative inheritance, and population genetics. 

275 INTRODUCTION TO ANIMAL NUTRITION 

4 sem. hrs. 

Study of nutrients, their metabolism and utilization; 
digestive physiology in ruminants, non-ruminants and 
avians; diet formulation and ration balancing. Formerly 
AGR 171. Prerequisite: AGR 170. 

280 LIVESTOCK AND DAIRY CATTLE SELECTION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Fundamentals of livestock and dairy selection; relation to 
production, marketing, and showing. Lab and field trips. 

282 PHYSIOLOGY OF FARM ANIMALS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Study of form (anatomy) and function (physiology) of farm 
animals including skeletal, nervous, muscular, immune, res- 
piratory, cardiovascular and endocrine systems. Formerly 
LIVESTOCK HEALTH AND DISEASES. Prerequisites: 
AGR 170; BSC 196 or 197. 

283 REPRODUCTIVE PHYSIOLOGY AND 
ARTIFICIAL INSEMINATION 

OF FARM ANIMALS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Principles of artificial insemination and factors affecting con- 
ception in natural and artificial breeding. Lecture and lab. For- 
merly ARTIFICIAL INSEMINA TION OF FARM ANIMALS. 

285 MEAT SCIENCE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Comprehensive treatment of the meat industry and pre- 
sentation of basic facts about one of our most important 
food products. Lecture and lab. Offered odd-numbered 
years. Materials charge optional. 



286 BEHAVIOR OF DOMESTIC ANIMALS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Behavioral patterns and systems, group formations, social- 
ization, physical environment, genetic and physiological fac- 
tors as they relate to domestic animals. Prerequisite: AGR 
1 70 recommended. 

288 ADVANCED LIVESTOCK AND 
DAIRY CATTLE SELECTION 

3 sem. hrs. 

Judging various species of livestock in relation to their func- 
tions in the show ring and market and the presentation of 
oral reasons. Lab and field trips. Prerequisite: AGR 280. 

295 SUMMER INTERNSHIP IN 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Experience in the profession of agricultural education in 
high school. Includes program planning and working with 
special-needs students. Includes Clinical Experience: 100 
hours, Type 1-4, 9. Prerequisite: Admission to Profes- 
sional Studies. 

302 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN AGRICULTURE 
1-3 sem. hrs. 

Special work in research interests of student and staff. Pro- 
jects must be approved by the staff member and the Chair- 
person of the Department. May be repeated; maximum 6 
hours. Prerequisite: Major/minor in Agriculture or Agricul- 
ture Business; 2.50 GPA required. 

303 SEMINAR IN AGRICULTURE 
1 sem. hrs. 

Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing required. 

304 GEOSPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES 
IN AGRICULTURE 

3 sem. hrs. 

To understand the acquisition and analysis of geographically 
referenced data for the management of crop production sys- 
tems. Formerly AGR 237, GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION 
SYSTEMS AND GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEMS 
APPLICATIONS IN AGRICULTURE. 

305 CROP GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 

4 sem. hrs. 

Crop management and plant growth as influenced by the 
environment, plant species, cropping systems, and principles 
of integrated crop management (ICM). Lecture and lab. For- 
merly AGR 250. 

306 WEED SCIENCE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Principles and practices of weed management systems, 
including chemical and non-chemical controls. Identification 
and biology of common weed species. Lecture and lab. For- 
merly AGR 263. 

310 RURAL APPRAISALS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Principles, procedures, and terminology for evaluating rural 
property; preparation of appraisal reports as currently pre- 
pared by qualified and experienced rural appraisers. Field 
trips. Prerequisites: AGR 216 or 318 or ACC 131 recom- 
mended and an academic background in agriculture. 




94 



Agriculture 



311 STRATEGIC AGRIBUSINESS SALES 
3 sem. hrs. 

Skills, ethics and behavior theories and concepts for the 
professional, business-to-business, agribusiness salesper- 
son. Prerequisites: Junior/senior standing; AGR 215 or 
consent instructor. 

312 ADVANCED FARM ACCOUNTING 

3 sem. hrs. 

Advanced farm business records and analysis with emphasis 
on computer applications. Prerequisites: AGR 213 and 216. 

313 ADVANCED FARM MANAGEMENT 
3 sem. hrs, 

Farm business decisions and their interrelationships. 
Examination of statics, dynamics, and uncertainty in agri- 
cultural decision-making. Prerequisite: AGR 213 and 
216. 

314 MARKETING GRAIN AND LIVESTOCK 
3 sem. hrs. 

Economic principles applied to marketing grain and live- 
stock. Consideration given to producers and distributors of 
grain. Formerly GRAIN MARKETING. Not for credit if had 
AGR 3 1 6. Prerequisite: AGR 2 14 or consent instructor. 

315 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT AND 
ANALYSIS OF THE AGRIBUSINESS FIRM 
3 sem. hrs. 

Application of quantitative concepts and methods to the 
analysis and financial management of proprietary and coop- 
erative agribusiness firms. Prerequisites: AGR 215; MAT 
120; and AGR 216 or ACC 131 or consent instructor. 

317 FOOD INDUSTRY MARKETING AND 
STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT 

3 sem. hrs. 

Marketing management and decision-making as they relate 
to corporate and cooperative marketing and strategic prob- 
lem solving in the food industry. Prerequisites: AGR 2 1 5 or 
consent instructor. 

318 AGRICULTURAL FINANCE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Principles of agricultural finance including the capital 
requirements, the sources of credit, and the optimum uses 
of capital. Prerequisites: AGR 2 1 6 or ACC 131. 

319 AGRICULTURAL POLICIES AND PROGRAMS 

3 sem. hrs. 

History and impact of governmental intervention in agricul- 
ture. Examination of major agricultural programs, past and 
present. Prerequisite: AGR 1 10. 

320 FARM COMMODITY PRICING 
3 sem. hrs. 

Theory and mechanics of price determination for agriculture 
commodities. Prerequisite: AGR 214. 

324 COMMODITY FUTURES AND OPTIONS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Examines the evolution of futures markets and the use of 
futures and options contracts as price risk management tools. 
Prerequisites: AGR 214 or consent of instructor. 



340 CURRENT RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY 
IN AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 
TECHNOLOGY 

3 sem. hrs. 

A critical examination of the most recent technologies and 
research being introduced into the agricultural and horticultur- 
al industries. Lecture, lab. Formerly EQUIPMENT FOR PRO- 
DUCING AND HANDLING AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS. 
Prerequisite: AGR 130 or consent of instructor. 

352 RESIDENTIAL AND SPORTS 
TURF MANAGEMENT 

3 sem. hrs. 

Principles and practices used in the management of residen- 
tial and recreational turfgrasses. Lecture, lab and field trips. 
Offered odd-numbered years. Materials charge optional. 
Formerly TURF MANAGEMENT. Prerequisites: AGR 120 
and 150 or consent instructor. 

353 LANDSCAPE DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Problem approach to landscape design and construction. Site 
surveys and analyses. Plant selection and preparation of 
functional designs. Lectures and practice in landscape 
design. Prerequisites: AGR 252 and 255. 

355 PLANT BIOTECHNOLOGY AND BREEDING 
3 sem. hrs. 

Breeding procedures and techniques used in developing new 
varieties of field crops. Offered even-numbered years. 

356 PLANT PROPAGATION 

3 sem. hrs. 

Basic principles and commercial practices involved in sex- 
ual and asexual propagation of agricultural plants. Lecture 
and lab. Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: AGR 150 or 
BSC196orl97. 

357 SOIL FERTILITY AND FERTILIZERS 

4 sem. hrs. 

Fundamental concepts of soil fertility and fertilizer manufac- 
turing. Plant nutrition, factors affecting plant growth, soil- 
plant relationships, and macro- and micro-nutrients. Lecture, 
lab, and field trips. Prerequisite: AGR 157. 

363 AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Principles of agricultural research for plant and animal sci- 
ences; includes design, data collection, interpretation, and 
presentation of results. Offered odd-numbered years. Former- 
ly AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENTATION. Prerequisites: 
MAT 120 or 144. 

372 LIVESTOCK BREEDING 
3 sem. hrs. 

Reproduction and principles of heredity and their application 
to livestock breeding; population genetics, inbreeding, rela- 
tionship, outbreeding, and selection. Prerequisites: AGR 272 
orBSC219. 

375 ANIMAL NUTRITION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Science of animal nutrition; special attention to recent dis- 
coveries pertaining to the protein, mineral, and vitamin 
requirements of livestock. Field trips. Offered odd-numbered 
years. Prerequisites: AGR 170 and 171. 



Agriculture; Criminal Justice Sciences 



95 



380 CURRENT ISSUES IN THE 
LIVESTOCK INDUSTRY 
3 sem. hrs. 

A study of the history and evolution of the livestock industry 
as impacted by internal and external factors. Lecture. Not for 
credit if had AGR 274, 276, 371, 378. Formerly CURRENT 
ISSUES IN THE BEEF CATTLE INDUSTRY. Prerequisites: 
AGR 170, 173.01 or 173.02, 272, 275, 282, 283, 286, or 
consent of instructor. Senior standing recommended. 

381.01 LIVESTOCK INDUSTRY: BEEF CATTLE 
2 sem. hrs. 

Basic principles and commercial practices involved in feedlot 
and cow-calf management. Lecture and lab. Not for credit if 
had AGR 378, 381 BEEF CATTLE INDUSTRY. Prerequisites: 
AGR 170, 173.01 or 173.02, 272, 275, 282, 283, 286, 380 or 
concurrent registration, or consent of instructor. 

381.02 LIVESTOCK INDUSTRY: DAIRY CATTLE 
2 sem. hrs. 

Basic principles and commercial practices involved in dairy 
cattle management. Lecture and lab. Not for credit if had 
AGR 274. Prerequisites: AGR 170, 173.01 or 173.02, 272, 
275, 282, 283, 286, 380 or concurrent registration, or con- 
sent of instructor. 

381.03 LIVESTOCK INDUSTRY: SWINE 

2 sem. hrs. 

Basic principles and commercial practices involved in 
swine management. Lecture and lab. Not for credit if had 
AGR 276. Prerequisites: AGR 170, 173.01, 173.02, 272, 
275, 282, 283, 286, 380 or concurrent registration, or con- 
sent of instructor. 

383 AGRICULTURAL SAFETY AND HEALTH 

3 sem. hrs. 

Major problems of accident causation and prevention applic- 
able to agriculture and the need for farm safety education, 
engineering, and enforcement countermeasures. Half-day 
Saturday field trip at end of semester required, ^lso offered 
as HSC 383. Formerly AGRICULTURAL ACCIDENT PRE- 
VENTION. Prerequisite: CHE 1 10, 140 or consent instructor 
or admission to Environmental Health and Safety graduate 
program required. 

386 ANIMAL WELFARE 

2 sem. hrs. 

Examination of the multidisciplinary tools used to study and 
assess animal welfare. Prerequisites: AGR 170 and 286 or 
consent of instructor. 

394 METHODS AND PROCEDURES IN 
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

3 sem. hrs. 

Procedures in planning, conducting, and evaluating an 
agricultural education program; pragmatic interfacing of 
learning theories, philosophy and guidance with instruc- 
tional programs in agriculture. Includes Clinical Experi- 
ence: 10 hours, Type 1-6, 9. Prerequisite: Admission to 
Professional Studies. 

395 PROFESSIONAL SEMINAR 

IN AGRICULTURE EDUCATION 
2 sem. hrs. 

In-depth analysis of selected trends, issues, problems con- 
fronting the agricultural educator. Prerequisites: STT 399 
concurrent registration, Admission to Professional Studies. 



398 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 

INTERNSHIP IN AGRICULTURE 
1-6 sem. hrs. 

Supervised on-the-job experience in an agriculture setting. 
Minimum 45 hours experience/credit. May be repeated; 
maximum 6 hours. Prerequisites: Major in any AGR pro- 
gram; 2.50 GPA; 8 hours of course work in intern area; 
approved application required. 



CRIMINAL JUSTICE 
SCIENCES (CJS) 525 

441 Schroeder Hall, (309) 438-7626 

Web address: CriminalJustice.IUinoisState.edu 

Chairperson: Jacqueline Schneider. 

Tenured/Tenure-track Faculty: 

Distinguished Professor: Weisheit. 

Professors: Kethineni, Morn, Wells. 

Associate Professor: Beichner, Gizzi, Krienert, Schneider, 

Walsh. 

Assistant Professors: Ingram, Leyman, Rabe-Hemp, 

General Department Information 

The purpose of the Criminal Justice Sciences program is 
to provide the student with a system orientation to the field of 
Criminal Justice. Study in Criminal Justice involves the 
application of the principles of Criminal Justice and the relat- 
ed behavioral and social sciences to problems and issues in 
the field of Criminal Justice. The program focuses on the 
building of knowledge in the areas of law enforcement, 
courts, and corrections from a social science perspective. Stu- 
dents develop a knowledge base for an in-depth understand- 
ing of human behavior and the kinds of problems and 
circumstances that often result in criminality. Finally, the pro- 
gram provides students with the opportunity to gain neces- 
sary skills in the area of interviewing, program development, 
community organization, planning and research to function in 
a professional position in the field of Criminal Justice. 

Program Admission Requirements for New and Contin- 
uing Students: 

Admission to this academic program is limited and is 
based on space availability and the competitiveness of the 
applicant pool. Factors that may be considered include, but 
are not limited to: courses completed, cumulative GPA, 
hours completed, personal interview or written statement, 
and samples of work completed. For additional information 
on minimum requirements for admission and the application 
and selection process, visit www.FindYourMajor.ilsru.edu or 
contact the undergraduate advisor for the intended major. 

The Department of Criminal Justice Sciences reserves 
the right to maintain a balanced enrollment. 

a. This may restrict the numbers of freshmen, transfer stu- 
dents, and continuing students who wish to be Criminal 
Justice Sciences majors. 

b. Most Criminal Justice Sciences courses are restricted to 
Criminal Justice Science majors. 



96 



Criminal Justice Sciences 



Retention Requirements: 

Criminal Justice Sciences majors must maintain a 
cumulative GPA of at least 2.40 every semester. If, at any 
given time, a student's GPA falls below a 2.40 that student 
may be removed from the major and reclassified as Unde- 
clared. After a student is reclassified as Undeclared, all 
rights as a major are forfeited, including the right to be eligi- 
ble to do the Criminal Justice Sciences internship. 

Students who have been reclassified must meet regu- 
lar admission requirements to be eligible for readmission 
to the major. 

HONORS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE SCIENCES 

The Department offers honors study in Criminal Justice 
Sciences to highly qualified students who will pursue an indi- 
vidualized program of study. The Honors Program enables 
the superior student to focus on topics of the student's own 
choosing in close consultation with a Criminal Justice Sci- 
ences Department faculty member. In order to qualify, the 
student must have achieved a GPA of 3.30 or better, both 
overall and in the major. The student must complete: 

1 . at least 3 hours credit of in-course honors; 

2. at least 3 hours credit in CJS 299 — Independent Honors 
Study or Honors-Undergraduate Research (IDS 285 or 
286) in the Criminal Justice Sciences Department; and 

3. an additional 3 hours of in-course honors, honors inde- 
pendent study or honors-undergraduate research, equiv- 
alent with a grade of B or better. 

Students must also fulfill the general education require- 
ments for participation in the University's Honors Program. 
Successful completion of the Honors Program will provide 
the designation of Honors in Criminal Justice Sciences 
upon graduation. The University will note the Honors 
designation on official transcripts and the diploma. 

Students interested in participating in the Honors Pro- 
gram should inquire about admission in the Office of the 
Department of Criminal Justice Sciences. 

Criminal Justice Sciences Programs 

Degrees Offered: B.A., B.S. 

MAJOR IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE SCIENCES 

— 64 hours required. 

— Required courses: CJS 101, 200, 201, 207, 208, 300, 
395, 398.01* (6 hours), 398.02* (6 hours). 

— 2 1 hours of electives selected with the approval of the 
academic advisor. A minimum of 12 hours must be 
selected from Illinois State University Department of 
Criminal Justice Sciences course offerings (Group I). 
See departmental website for courses designated as 
Group I. The remaining electives (Group II) must be 
taken from the list of recommended courses from other 
departments at Illinois State University, or may be 
appropriate transfer credit. Group II electives in other 
departments: LAN 111, 112, 115, 1 16 (8 hour maxi- 
mum); FIL 185; MOM 220, 221; POL 201, 215, 231, 
330, 331; PSY 223, 233, 302, 350; SOC 223, 263, 264, 



365, 367; SED 362. Students who major in Criminal 
Justice Sciences must complete the following courses 
or equivalents: ENG 145; PSY 110 or 111; SOC 106. 

♦Students seeking enrollment in CJS 398.01 and 398.02 
must complete necessary paperwork for application to the 
internship which will be received during mandatory meet- 
ings set by the Internship Coordinator. To be eligible, the 
student must have: (1) completed 90 semester hours, (2) an 
overall and major GPA of 2.40 at the time referrals are 
made, and (3) completed all required courses including SOC 
106; PSY 110 or 111; and ENG 145. Students who have 
completed accredited corrections and/or police training may 
substitute this training for a portion of the internship with 
departmental approval. Students eligible for an internship 
will, with the assistance of the internship coordinator, 
choose an agency from a list of approved agencies. Stu- 
dents may also participate in out-of-state internships. 

MINOR IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE SCIENCES 

— 2 1 hours required. 

— Required courses: CJS 101, 200, 201, 207, 208. 

— 6 hours of electives selected, with the approval of an aca- 
demic advisor, from the Department of Criminal Justice 
Sciences course offerings. 

— NOTE: Space in Criminal Justice Sciences courses is 
limited for non-majors. 

Criminal Justice Sciences Courses 

101 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL 
JUSTICE SCIENCES 

3 sem. hrs. 

An analysis of the criminal justice system focusing on the 
police, courts, and corrections. 

102 INDIVIDUALS, SOCIETY, AND JUSTICE 
3 sem. hrs. MC-ICL 

Explores justice, law, and civic life from historical, compar- 
ative, social science, and contemporary cultural perspectives. 
May not be taken under the CT/NC option. Not for credit 
major/minor. Prerequisites: ENG 101 or COM 110 or con- 
current registration. 

200 CONTEMPORARY CORRECTIONS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Familiarizes students with correctional alternatives as 
they currently exist. Controversies and emerging trends in 
corrections will be considered. Prerequisites: CJS 101. 
Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 

201 CRIME AND BEHAVIOR 
3 sem. hrs. 

Theoretical and conceptual explanations of criminal 
behavior. Prerequisites: CJS 101; SOC 106; PSY 110 or 
111. Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 

206 FUNDAMENTALS OF 

CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION 

3 sem. hrs. 

An intensive analysis of the criminal investigation process 
including information gathering and analysis, preservation of 
evidence, legal issues, and investigative strategies. Prerequisites: 
CJS 101. Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 



Criminal Justice Sciences 



97 



207 CONTEMPORARY POLICING IN AMERICA 
3 sem. hrs. 

Survey of law enforcement, its history, police practices, func- 
tions, and related issues and concepts of contemporary police. 
Prerequisites: CJS 101. Major/minor only or consent depart- 
ment advisor. 

208 CRIMINAL LAW 
3 sem. hrs. 

Survey of criminal law, including development of substantive 
criminal law. Examination of judicial opinions related to the 
criminal justice process. Formerly CJS 304. Prerequisites: 
CJS 101. Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 

212 COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Theoretical basis, current methodology, and operations: court 
counselors, citizen action, half-way houses, work-release, 
drug abuse treatment, detention, reception and diagnostic cen- 
ters, and probation and parole. Prerequisites: CJS 101 and 
ENG 145; Major/minor only. CJS 200 recommended. 

215 JUVENILE JUSTICE 
3 sem. hrs. 

The processing and treatment of juvenile offenders. Exam- 
ines the organization, operation, and goals of the individuals, 
agencies, and institutions that work with youthful offenders. 
Prerequisites: CJS 101. Major/minor only or consent depart- 
ment advisor. 

240 HISTORY OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Crime and the American criminal justice system from the colo- 
nial period until the mid-20th century. Prerequisite: CJS 101. 

298.50 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 
IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE 
1 sem. hr. 

Paid, supervised experiences in local, state, and federal crimi- 
nal justice agencies. Enrollment limited, based on availability 
of sites. May be repeated once. Prerequisites: Sophomore or 
junior standing; prior department approval. CJS major only. 

300 RESEARCH METHODS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Assesses basic components of how research is conducted in 
criminal justice inquiries. Examines the criteria for social sci- 
entific research in the criminal justice field. Formerly EVALU- 
ATIVE RESEARCH OF PROGRAMS IN CRIMINAL 
JUSTICE. Prerequisites: CJS 101. Junior standing (60 hours 
completed). Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 

305 RULES OF EVIDENCE FOR THE 
ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE 

3 sem. hrs. 

Types of evidence, standards of proof, and legal requirements 
relating to the admissibility of evidence in court. Prerequi- 
sites: CJS 101 and 208. Junior standing (60 hours completed). 
Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 

306 EXPERIENCES IN INTERNATIONAL 
JUSTICE 

3 or 6 sem. hrs. 

The course involves an exploration of a foreign country. 
Students will have exposure to cultural, political, social and 
criminal justice issues. Travel fees apply. Prerequisite: 
Freshman standing (12 hours completed). 



307 FAMILY VIOLENCE: CROSS-CULTURAL 
PERSPECTIVES 

3 sem. hrs. 

Analysis of family violence in the US and other countries. 
Emphasis on police and judiciary response, solutions and 
treatments. Prerequisites: CJS 101. Junior standing (60 hours 
completed). Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 

308 RACE, ETHNICITY, AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Historical and contemporary perspectives of race, ethnicity, 
crime, and justice relations in the United States. Prerequisites: 
CJS 101; major/minor only or consent department advisor. 

310 CORRECTIONAL INSTITUTIONS 
3 sem. hrs. 

An intensive analysis of correctional institutions and jails 
focusing on management issues, inmate subcultures, and pris- 
onization. Prerequisites: Junior standing (60 hours completed). 
CJS 101 , 200 or consent department advisor. CJS major only. 

322 COMMUNICATION SKILLS 
IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Development of interpersonal communication, interviewing 
and decision-making skills for intervention with criminal jus- 
tice clients. Prerequisites: Junior standing (60 hours complet- 
ed). CJS 201 concurrent registration or consent instructor. 

337 SEX OFFENDERS AND THE 
CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM 
3 sem. hrs. 

Analysis of sex offender prevalence and typologies. Emphasis 
on assessment, treatment, and management within the com- 
munity. Prerequisites: CJS 101. Junior standing (60 hours 
completed). Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 

338 ALCOHOL, DRUGS, AND CRIME 
3 sem. hrs. 

Analysis of the impact of alcohol and drugs on crime and 
the criminal justice system. Prerequisites: CJS 101. Junior 
standing (60 hours completed). Major/minor only or con- 
sent department advisor. 

339 WOMEN IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Historical and theoretical perspectives and contemporary 
trends concerning women and crime and processing of 
women by the criminal justice system. Prerequisites: CJS 
101 required. Junior standing (60 hours completed). 
Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 

340 ORGANIZED AND WHITE COLLAR CRIME 
3 sem. hrs. 

Analysis of organized and white collar crime problem in 
America. Topics include prevalence, impact, laws, and 
investigative techniques. Prerequisites: CJS 101. Junior 
standing (60 hours completed). Major/minor only or consent 
department advisor. 

342 VICTIMOLOGY 
3 sem. hrs. 

An examination of the victim's role in the criminal 
event, the process of victimization, patterns, trends, theo- 
ries, and victim offender relationships. Prerequisites: 
Junior standing. CJS 101 or consent department advisor. 
CJS 201 recommended. 




98 



Criminal Justice Sciences; Family and Consumer Sciences 



360 ISSUES IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE 
1-4 sem. hrs. 

A critical and analytical study of a contemporary issue or 
controversy in the field of criminal justice. May be repeated 
once; maximum 6 hours if content different. Prerequisites: 
Junior standing (60 hours completed). Major/minor only or 
consent department advisor. 

369 WORLD CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEMS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Analysis of crime and criminal justice systems of select- 
ed countries. Emphasis on England, France, Sweden, 
Japan, and Russia. Prerequisites: Junior standing (60 
hours completed). CJS 101 or consent department advisor. 

395 CRIMINAL JUSTICE ADMINISTRATION 

4 sem. hrs. 

Aspects of organizational behavior in criminal justice agen- 
cies will be considered to enable the student to better under- 
stand on-the-job experiences. Prerequisites: Junior 
standing (60 hours completed). CJS 101, 200, 201, 207, 208 
and 300; consent department advisor, CJS major only. 

398.01 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 
CRIMINAL JUSTICE INTERNSHIP I 
6 sem. hrs. 

Field placement in a criminal justice related agency. Interns 
work with designated agency personnel and receive an overview 
of agency functions. Prerequisites: CJS 395 and consent 
department advisor, CJS major only. See CJS major requirements 
for enrollment limitations. CR/NC only. 

398.02 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 
CRIMINAL JUSTICE INTERNSHIP H 

6 sem. hrs. 

Intensive experience in a single criminal justice agency 
setting. Prerequisites: CJS 395, 398.01 and consent 
department advisor, CJS major only. See CJS major 
requirements for enrollment limitations. CR/NC only. 



FAMILY AND CONSUMER 
SCIENCES (FCS) 506 

144 Turner Hall, (309) 438-2517 
Web address: FCS.IllinoisState.edu 

Chairperson: Connor Walters. 

Tenured/Tenure-track Faculty: 

Professors: Murphy, Nnakwe, Walters. 

Associate Professors: Wilson. 

Assistant Professors: Anderson, Banning, Cullen, Dyar, 

Gam, Johnson, Ma, Riehm. 

General Department Information 

Family and Consumer Sciences is a profession commit- 
ted to improving the quality of life for individuals and fami- 
lies. The mission of the department is to provide integrative 
study of the human environment and systems that impact and 
strengthen individuals, family units, agencies, businesses, 
and the community at large. 



Family and Consumer Sciences is a broad field of study 
that provides opportunity for specialization in challenging 
careers. The faculty seek to prepare men and women to enter 
professions concerned with enhancing the quality of life for 
individuals, families and communities, and the environment 
in which they function. Academic preparation involves the 
integration and application of knowledge and skills gained 
from family and consumer science courses as well as courses 
in a variety of other disciplines. 

The Department serves undergraduate and graduate 
majors specializing in fields such as interior design, child 
development, family life education, consumer services, 
nutrition and dietetics, apparel merchandising, and family 
and consumer sciences teacher education. 

HONORS IN FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES 

The Department offers honors work in each Family and 
Consumer Sciences sequence to highly qualified juniors and 
seniors. Candidates must be full-time students, declared 
Family and Consumer Sciences majors, and have an overall 
3.30 GPA and 3.50 GPA in Family and Consumer Sciences. 
Honors requirements include completion of 3 in-course hon- 
ors at the 200-level or above (at least 2 must be taken in the 
Department), and a minimum of 3 hours in FCS 299 culmi- 
nating in a substantial research paper. The Department also 
offers in-course honors work in all courses for students 
enrolled in the University Honors Program or in any depart- 
mental honors program. In-course honors work is offered at 
the discretion of the instructor. For further information con- 
tact the departmental advisor. All Family and Consumer Sci- 
ences honors students must fulfill the general requirements 
for participation in the University Honors Program. 

Family and Consumer Sciences 
Programs 

Degrees Offered: B.A., B.S. 

Admission Requirements for Family and Consumer Sci- 
ences Majors (Non-Teacher Education Options): 

A student may enter a major or minor in the Depart- 
ment of Family and Consumer Sciences as a freshman, trans- 
fer student or as a change of major at Illinois State 
University. Students should contact the Family and Con- 
sumer Sciences Undergraduate Advisor for minimum GPA 
requirements and/or other admission requirements. Options 
in the Department of Family and Consumer Sciences are in 
high demand and admissions are based on a combination of 
student qualifications and course capacities. 

MAJOR IN FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES 

Apparel Merchandising and Design Sequence: 

The Apparel Merchandising and Design Sequence 
prepares students for careers such as fashion marketer, 
retail manager, fashion buyer, private label developer, 
visual merchandiser, merchandiser, technical designer, 



Family and Consumer Sciences 



99 



apparel/textile designer, quality assurance supervisor, 
purchasing agent, trend analyst, fashion journalist, and 
museum curator/conservator. 

— 59-62 hours required. 

— 1 1-hour core: FCS 101, 103, 200, 300. 

- 48-51 hour sequence: FCS 225, 226, 323, 327, 328, 
329, 362; ECO 105; MKT 230; PSY 110 or 
PSY/SOC 131; and option A or B that follows: 

A. Merchandising: FCS 368, 369, 371, 398 (3 
hours); MQM 220; MKT 335. 

B. Apparel Design/Product Development: FCS 122, 
228, 321, 324, 361, 366, 365 or 398 (3 hours). 

— For students interested in Fashion Merchandising, a 
Business Administration, Marketing or Communica- 
tion minor is recommended; for students interested in 
Apparel Design/Product Development, an Art, The- 
atre, Marketing, or Business Administration minor 
is recommended; for students interested in Fash- 
ion Journalism, a Communication minor is recom- 
mended; for students interested in Museum 
Curator/Conservator, a minor in History or Art Histo- 
ry is recommended. 

— A travel study for credit is available periodically. 

Food, Nutrition and Dietetics Sequence: 

Career opportunities in the broad field of food, nutri- 
tion and dietetics are quite varied and employment exists 
throughout the areas of healthcare, food service, educa- 
tion and research. Employment opportunities include: 
clinical or foodservice dietitian in a healthcare organiza- 
tion, food service manager for a company, nutrition con- 
sultant for a physician practice, community nutritionist, 
nutrition and health writer, food and nutrition product 
sales and marketing, corporate wellness, food promotion for 
a grocery store, school foodservice and others. 

The Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD) at Illinois 
State University is currently accredited by the Commission 
on Accreditation for Dietetics Education (CADE) of the 
American Dietetics Association (ADA). CADE is recog- 
nized by the United States Department of Education and the 
Council for Higher Education Accreditation, and can be con- 
tacted at 120 South Riverside Plaza, Suite 2000, Chicago, IL 
60606-6995, (312) 899-0040, Ext. 5400. 

— 66-67 hours required. 

— 1 1-hour core: FCS 101, 103, 200, 300. 

— The following General Education courses must be 
taken: Inner Core— CHE 110 and 112; Outer Core— 
BSC 160. 

— 55-56-hour sequence: FCS 102, 113, 213, 311, 312, 
316, 317, 318, 319, 398 (3 hours); BSC 160; CHE 220, 
242; ECO 103 or 105; KNR 182; MQM 220; PSY 110 
or 111,215. 

— This program provides the first step for students 
wanting to become a registered dietitian (R.D.). Stu- 
dents must apply for an ADA-approved dietetic 
internship after graduation, and then successfully 
complete the registration examination to be an R.D. 



An American Dietetic Association Verification State- 
ment of DPD Program Completion will be given to 
students completing this sequence. This official state- 
ment is required for graduates to begin an ADA- 
approved dietetic internship after acceptance, and for 
other professional applications requiring verification 
of DPD Program completion. 

Human Development and Family Resources Sequence: 

The Human Development and Family Resources 
Sequence prepares students for careers such as child care 
provider or center director; child life specialist in hospital 
settings; child care resource and referral specialist; family 
life educator or marriage enrichment provider; extension 
specialist or youth program director; case worker or man- 
ager; elder services coordinator; consumer advocate; con- 
sumer relations specialist; product development consultant; 
or middle, junior, or high school teacher. 

— 41-62 hours required. 

— 11 -hour core: FCS 101, 103, 200, 300. 

— 30-51-hour sequence: FCS 231, 232, 233, 310, 333 
and option A, B, C, or D that follows. A. Human 
Development: FCS 250, 251, 307, 308, 309, 331, 
398 (3 hours); SWK 323; and 12 hours from FCS 
111, 212, 224, 305, 306, 314. B. Family Relation- 
ships: FCS 305, 309, 364, 398 (3 hours); SWK 323; 
and 15 hours from FCS 111, 212, 330, 331, 394; C&I 
312; HSC 390; PSY 111, 302, 303; SOC 106, 123, 
211, 212, 262, 311, 341, 342, 365. C. Consumer Ser- 
vices: FCS 330, 331, 364, 398 (3 hours); ECO 105; 
MKT 230, 231. D. Teacher Education: FCS 102, 
111, 113, 203, 250. Part of the endorsement program 
leading to certification by the State of Illinois for 
teaching Family and Consumer Sciences courses 
grades 6-12 in Family and Consumer Sciences - 
Nutrition, Wellness, and Hospitality designation. See 
the Family and Consumer Science advisor for infor- 
mation about courses that count towards additional 
Family and Consumer Science endorsements. Twen- 
ty-four (24) hours Professional Education (see C&I 
Professional Education Requirements in the Under- 
graduate Catalog), including STT 399. 

See Professional Studies Admission-Retention pro- 
gram found in University-Wide Professional Studies Pro- 
gram Requirements for admission and retention 
standards. Also see Family and Consumer Sciences Selec- 
tive Admission-Retention Requirements section of this 
Undergraduate Catalog. 

Interior and Environmental Design Sequence: 

The Interior and Environmental Design Sequence pre- 
pares students for careers in residential design, contract 
design, space planning, store design, restaurant design, 
kitchen and bath design, historic preservation and design for 
special populations. 




100 



Family and Consumer Sciences 



The undergraduate Interior and Environmental 
Design (IED) program at Illinois State University is 
currently accredited by the Council for Interior De- 
sign Accreditation. 

— 63 hours required. 

— 1 1-hour core: FCS 101, 103, 200, 300. 

— 52-hour sequence: FCS 104, 218, 225, 242, 244, 338, 
340, 345, 346, 347, 348, 370, 375, 398 (3 hours); FCS 
352; ART 372 or 373; TEC 1 17, 217. 

— Possible minors based on individual interests: Industrial 
Technology, Construction Management, Art or Business. 

- Recommended electives: FCS 393.38; TEC 322. 

— To be licensed in the State of Illinois, students must 
have a minimum of 2 years professional work experi- 
ence and pass the National Council for Interior 
Design Qualification (NCIDQ) Examination. Passage 
of this exam also qualifies the individual profession- 
al membership in interior design organizations such 
as American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) 
and International Interior Design Association (IIDA). 

MINOR IN FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES 

— 23 hours required in Family and Consumer Sciences. 

— 1 1-hour core: FCS 101, 103, 200, 300. 

— 12 additional hours in Family and Consumer Sciences. 



CLINICAL EXPERIENCES EN TEACHER EDUCATION 

Clinical Experiences are provided in off-campus 
clinical teaching centers, in local schools and in campus 
laboratory schools, in agencies and other approved non- 
school settings. All students will show verification of 
having completed pre-student teaching field experiences 
commensurate with attaining local, state, and national 
standards. Students must provide their own transporta- 
tion to Clinical Experience sites. 

The approximate number of clinical hours and type of 
activity associated with each course offering can be found 
with the appropriate course description. The following 
legend relates to the type and kind of activity related to a 
specific course. 

Clinical Experiences Legend 



1. 


Observation 


2. 


Tutoring one-on-one contact 


3. 


Non-instruction assisting 


4. 


Instructional aiding a group 


5. 


Micro teaching 


6. 


Simulation lab exercises 


7. 


Work with clinic client 


8. 


Graduate practicum 


9. 


Professional meeting 


10 


Other 



Selective Admission-Retention Requirements for the Teacher 
Education Option in Family and Consumer Sciences: 

Selective Admission: 

All Family and Consumer Sciences Education students 
planning to become certified teachers must apply for and be 
admitted to the University's Professional Studies program 
(see Professional Studies Admission-Retention program sec- 
tion of this Undergraduate Catalog). Upon applying for 
admission each Family and Consumer Sciences student must 
have verified the following: 

1. A minimum GPA of 2.50 overall and in all Family and 
Consumer Sciences courses including Professional 
Education courses. 

2. A positive recommendation for Admission to Profes- 
sional Studies by all Family and Consumer Sciences 
faculty. See departmental advisor for procedure. 

3. An interview with the Family and Consumer Sciences 
Education Coordinator. 

Selective Retention: 

In order to receive departmental approval for a student 
teaching assignment the student must verify the following: 

1. Maintain a GPA of 2.50 in all courses and in all Family 
and Consumer Sciences courses including Professional 
Education courses. 

2. Completion of FCS 200, or the equivalent for transfer 
students. 



Family and Consumer Sciences Courses 

101 HUMAN AND FAMILY DEVELOPMENT 
3 sem. hrs. 

Human development throughout the lifespan within the 
context of the developing family unit. 

102 NUTRITION IN THE LIFE SPAN 
3 sem. hrs. 

Nutrients needed by humans. Food choices to meet nutrition 
needs of individuals and families throughout the life cycle. 

103 MANAGEMENT FOR 
CONSUMERS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Management for individual and family problems in the 
home and marketplace. 

104 ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN 
ELEMENTS: STUDIO 

3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to design fundamentals and development of 
perceptual skills, creative awareness, and the technical 
ability to handle a variety of design media. Lecture and lab. 
Prerequisites: Major/minor only or consent advisor. 

Ill INTRODUCTION TO THE 
FAMILY AND CONSUMER 
SCIENCES EDUCATOR ROLE 

2 sem. hrs. 

Historical, methodological, and philosophical prologue 
unique to the family and consumer sciences educator role. 
Field trips; 15 clinical hours. Prerequisites: FCS 101 and 
103, consent instructor. 



112 AMERICAN FAMILY: CHANGE 

AND DIVERSITY MC-UST 

3 sem. hrs. 

Historical and comparative exploration of activities of family 
formation, maintenance, and reconfiguration in America. 
Emphasis on issues of diversity. May not be taken under the 
CT/NC option. Also offered as HIS/SOC 1 12. Prerequisites: 
ENG 101 or COM 1 10 or concurrent registration. 

113 PRINCIPLES OF FOOD PREPARATION 

3 sem. hrs. 

Scientific principles involved in the preparation of food. 
Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: FCS 102 
required. Major/minor only or consent advisor. 

122 APPAREL PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT I 
3 sem. hrs. 

Basic apparel production techniques. Materials charge option- 
al. Prerequisites: Major/minor only or consent advisor. 

198 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE 
1 sem. hr. 

Exploration of entry-level career opportunities. Observa- 
tion of professional skills and competencies of practicing 
home economists. CR/NC only. May be repeated; maximum 3 
hours. Prerequisites: Major only. 2.00 GPA; 27 hours; 
Approved application required. 

200 PRACTICAL PROBLEM SOLVING IN 
FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES 

3 sem. hrs. 

Mission and goals of family and consumer sciences related 
to the practical reasoning process for problem solving and 
critical thinking. Prerequisites: FCS 101, and 103; Junior 
standing. Major/minor only or consent advisor. 

203 COMPETENCIES FOR TEACHING 

4 sem. hrs. 

Curriculum development, evaluation, teaching strategies, 
and professionalism for vocational education teachers. 
Includes Clinical Experience: 20 hours, Type 1 and 10. Field 
trips required. Prerequisites: Admission to Professional 
Studies. FCS 111, C or better in C&I 212, 214, or 216; or 
PSY 215 (6 hours); or concurrent registration. Major/minor 
only or consent advisor. 

208 DYNAMICS OF UNITED STATES 

CONTEMPORARY HEALTH ISSUES OC-SMT 
3 sem. hrs. 

Exploration and analysis of current health and lifestyle 
issues. Emphasis on how individuals, communities and soci- 
ety make health decisions. Also offered as HSC/KNR 208. 
Prerequisites: Inner Core and MC-IS category required. 

212 FAMILY HEALTH AND WELL BEING 
3 sem. hrs. 

Relationship of personal decision making, self assessment 
and behavioral change to optimal wellness for individuals 
and families. Practicum rotations included. Prerequisites: 
FCS 101. Major/minor only or consent advisor. 

213 FOOD PLANNING, MARKETING, 
AND COST CONTROLS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Meal planning based on criteria of nutritive requirements, 
marketing challenges, and utilization of resources. Materials 
charge optional. Prerequisites: FCS 113. Major/minor only 
or consent advisor. 



Family and Consumer Sciences 101 

218 INTERIOR CONSTRUCTION AND 
BUILDING SYSTEMS 

2 sem. hrs. 

Evaluation of building infrastructure, including heating/cool- 
ing systems, electrical and plumbing conventions, and interi- 
or construction, as related to the design process. Field trips. 
Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: FCS 242. FCS 244 
concurrent registration recommended. 

222 CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN DRESS OC-SS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Interdisciplinary, comparative exploration of diverse cultures 
through dress and adornment. Prerequisites: Inner Core and 
MC-IS category. 

224 ENDURING ISSUES FOR COUPLES 

AND FAMILIES OC-SS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Analysis of persistent and newly emerging issues for cou- 
ples and families living in the 21st century. Prerequisites: 
Inner Core and MC-UST category. 

225 TEXTILES 
3 sem. hrs. 

Fundamentals of textile science: fibers, yarns, fabrications, 
finishes, and dyeing. Selection and care of apparel/home fur- 
nishings fabrics. Textile legislation. Lecture and lab. Materi- 
als charge optional. Prerequisites: Major/minor only or 
consent advisor. 

226 FASHION TREND AND INDUSTRY ANALYSIS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Fundamentals of the fashion industry, emphasis on analy- 
sis and forecasting of trends and sectors of apparel and 
merchandising industries. Formerly APPAREL. Prerequi- 
sites: Major/minor only or consent advisor. FCS 101 and 
103 recommended. 

228 APPAREL DESIGN 
3 sem. hrs. 

Application of art principles to apparel creation through com- 
puters and hand techniques. Idea development from conception 
through production to retailing. Style nomenclature empha- 
sized. Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: FCS 122, 226. 

231 FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Functions of productive family units to fulfill individual and 
group needs. Emphasis on the skills needed by the parent. 
Prerequisites: FCS 101 required or C&I 281 concurrent regis- 
tration recommended. Major/minor only or consent advisor. 

232 RESOURCE MANAGEMENT FOR 
INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES 

3 sem. hrs. 

Problem solving approach to the use of managerial compo- 
nents and their functional relationships to the complexities of 
today's living. Prerequisites: FCS 103. Major/minor only 
or consent advisor. 

233 FAMILY ECONOMIC RESOURCES 
3 sem. hrs. 

Economic description of the family emphasizing the family's 
financial, physical, and human capital investments over the 
life cycle. Prerequisites: FCS 103. Major/minor only or 
consent advisor. 




102 



Family and Consumer Sciences 



242 DRAFTING FOR INTERIOR DESIGN 
3 sem. hrs. 

Introduces students to equipment, media, and techniques for 
graphic presentation of architectural design. Materials charge 
optional. Prerequisites: Major/minor only or consent advisor. 

244 INTERIOR SYSTEMS AND HOUSING 
3 sem. hrs. 

Consumer choice of dwelling and the analysis of interior 
spaces and equipment. Field trips required. Prerequisite: 
FCS 104. 

250 DEVELOPMENT AND GUIDANCE OF 
PRESCHOOL CHILDREN 

3 sem. hrs. 

Applied child development and guidance of preschool chil- 
dren in early childhood programs. Emphasis on observation, 
assessment and developmentally appropriate practices. 
Includes Clinical Experience: 32 hours. Prerequisites: FCS 
101. Major/minor only or consent advisor. 

251 DEVELOPMENT AND GUIDANCE OF 
INFANTS AND TODDLERS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Applied child development guidance of infants and toddlers 
in early childhood programs. Emphasis on observation, 
assessment and developmentally appropriate practices. 
Includes Clinical Experience: 32 hours. Prerequisites: FCS 
101 . Major/minor only or consent advisor. 

300 LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT 
FOR FAMILY AND CONSUMER 
SCIENCES PROFESSIONALS 

2 sem. hrs. 

Leadership as a context for examining disciplinary issues 
and professional preparation while synthesizing knowledge 
and skills attained throughout the collegiate experience. Pre- 
requisites: FCS 200. Senior standing. 

305 FAMILIES IN LATER LIFE 

3 sem. hrs. 

Exploration of family dynamics in later life. Emphasis on 
developmental tasks, needs and decision-making issues of 
aging family members. Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

306 SEMINAR IN CHILD LIFE STUDIES 
3 sem. hrs. 

Application of child development theories and developmen- 
tally appropriate practices to children in health care settings. 
Prerequisites: FCS 101, and 250 or 251, consent of instructor. 
Practicum experience required. 

307 ADVANCED CHILD 
DEVELOPMENT APPLICATIONS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Application of research in the development and guidance of 
infants, toddlers and preschool age children as related to 
family and society. Includes Clinical Experience: 32 hours. 
Prerequisites: FCS 101, 250, 251. 

308 ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF 
EARLY CHILDHOOD PROGRAMS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Administration of early childhood programs and community 
services responsible for guidance of young children. 
Includes Clinical Experience: 20 hours, Type 10. Prerequi- 
sites: FCS 250 or consent instructor. 



309 COUPLE RELATIONSHIPS 
3 sem. hrs. 

An interactional approach to the study of intimate male- 
female pairing: establishing couple relationships and devel- 
oping effective intimate pairing communication; an 
overview of marriage enrichment history, programs, prac- 
tice, theory, and research. Prerequisite: FCS 23 1 . 

310 FAMILY CRISES 
3 sem. hrs. 

Cognitive and affective exploration of family crisis: defini- 
tion, management processes, and professional helping 
resources. Field trips required. Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

311 COMMUNITY NUTRITION 

3 sem. hrs. 

Nutritional needs of selected populations vulnerable to 
inadequate diet; emphasis on U.S. programs designed for 
groups at nutritional risk. Prerequisite: FCS 102. 

312 MEDICAL NUTRITION THERAPY 

4 sem. hrs. 

Planning modified diets and studying underlying diseases. 
Nutritional counseling of individuals and groups. Prerequi- 
site: FCS 317. 

314 EARLY CHILDHOOD NUTRITION 
EDUCATION 

3 sem. hrs. 

Principles of nutrition and current research. Emphasis 
on the needs of young children. Guidance in imple- 
menting a sound nutritional education program. 
Includes Clinical Experience. 

315 NUTRITION FOR HEALTH 
AND PHYSICAL FITNESS 

3 sem. hrs. 

An advanced course focusing on the physiological and bio- 
chemical importance of nutrition to health, physical fitness, 
and sports. Prerequisites: FCS 102 or consent instructor; 
KNR182;orBSC181andl82. 

316 FOOD SCIENCE 

3 sem. hrs. 

Experimental approach to principles underlying food 
preparation. Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: FCS 
213; CHE 110 and 112. 

317 NUTRITION AND METABOLISM 

4 sem. hrs. 

Physiological and biochemical basis for human nutritional 
requirements and health. Prerequisites: FCS 102; BSC 160; 
KNR 182. CHE 242 concurrent registration. 

318 FOOD SERVICE MANAGEMENT 
3 sem. hrs. 

Management of commercial foodservice systems: planning, 
control systems, decision making, human considerations. 
Prerequisites: FCS 103, 213; MQM 220. 

319 QUANTITY FOODS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Principles, techniques, and standards required to procure, 
store, and produce food in quantity for institutional and com- 
mercial feeding. Field trips. Prerequisite: FCS 213. 



Family and Consumer Sciences 



103 



321 FLAT PATTERN DESIGN 
3 sem. hrs. 

Computer and hand techniques in making garment patterns 
by the flat pattern method. Materials charge optional. Pre- 
requisites: FCS 122 or equivalent. Major/minor only or con- 
sent advisor. 

323 ADVANCED TEXTILES 
3 sem. hrs. 

Exploration of established practices and new developments 
in the textile and apparel industry. Research and problem- 
solving emphasis. Lecture and lab. Materials charge optional. 
Prerequisites: FCS 225, 226. 

324 DRAPING AND DESIGN 
3 sem. hrs. 

Interpretation of garment designs in fabric by means of the 
draping procedure. Materials charge optional. Prerequisite: 
FCS 122. 

327 CLOTHING AND BEHAVIOR 
3 sem. hrs. 

Factors that influence behavior related to clothing selection 
and use. Emphasis on research. Prerequisites: FCS 225, 226; 
PSY 1 10. Junior/senior standing only. 

328 ECONOMICS OF FASHION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Fashion as an economic force in the international economy. 
Fashion's influence on production, distribution and con- 
sumption of textiles and apparel. Prerequisites: FCS 225, 
226 and ECO 105. 

329 APPAREL PRODUCT ANALYSIS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Overview of apparel manufacturing and analysis of ready-to- 
wear apparel product quality. Prerequisites: FCS 122, 225 
and 226. 

330 DECISION-MAKING FOR CONSUMERS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Survey of consumer problems, trends, and information. Top- 
ics include: insurance, housing, credit, life style, consumer 
protection, leisure, and achieving financial security. Also 
offered as BTE 330. 



340 INTERIOR DESIGN I: STUDIO 
4 sem. hrs. 

Design principles applied to residential space. Students 
examine the ways in which rooms are affected by various 
design elements. Lecture and lab. Materials charge optional. 
Prerequisites: FCS 242. FCS 225 and 244 and TEC 117 or 
concurrent registration recommended. Major/minor only or 
consent advisor. 

345 INTERIOR DESIGN BUSINESS PRACTICES 
2 sem. hrs. 

Practices and procedures of professional design firms. 
Emphasis on business ownership, programming, purchasing 
procedures, billing hours, contracts and business forms. Pre- 
requisites: FCS 340 required; FCS 300 recommended. 

346 ENVIRONMENTAL LIGHTING DESIGN 
2 sem. hrs. 

Design of the luminous environment. Emphasis on light- 
ing sources, fixture schedules, switching patterns, and 
the required drawings used in residential and commer- 
cial applications. Prerequisite: FCS 340. 

347 HUMAN FACTORS IN 
INTERIOR ENVIRONMENTS 
2 sem. hrs. 

This course focuses on the functionality and aesthetics of 
interior environments with an emphasis on the interface 
between man-made environments and humans. The needs 
of special populations are addressed. Lecture and lab. 
Prerequisite: FCS 242. 

348 HISTORY OF INTERIOR AND 
ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN II 

2 sem. hrs. 

Major movements in architecture and interior design from the 
late 19th century to the present. Prerequisites: Major/minor 
only or consent advisor. FCS 338 recommended. 

352 RENDERING FOR INTERIOR DESIGNERS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Perspective sketching and delineations of architectural 
interiors. Various media and application techniques will 
be stressed for professional results in presentations. 
Also offered as ART 352. Prerequisites: FCS 242 or 
consent instructor. 



331 CONSUMER MATERIALS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Application and evaluation of consumer information sources. 
Prerequisites: FCS 103 required; 233 recommended. 

333 FAMILY AND CONSUMER PUBLIC POLICY 

3 sem. hrs. 

Public and private sector programs serving human needs; 
role of family and consumer science professional in the 
public policy arena. Prerequisites: FCS 103 required, FCS 
233 recommended. Major or minor only or consent advisor. 

338 HISTORY OF INTERIOR AND 
ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN I 
3 sem. hrs. 

Major stylistic time periods in architecture and interior 
design from antiquity to late 19th century. Prerequi- 
sites: Junior or senior standing. Major/minor only or 
consent advisor. 



361 FASHION HISTORY I 

3 sem. hrs. 

Analysis of historic costume from antiquity through 1 9th 
century, in relation to social and cultural environments. 
Emphasis on western world. Formerly FASHION HISTO- 
RY. Prerequisites: FCS 225, 226. 

362 FASHION HISTORY II 
3 sem. hrs. 

Analysis of 20th century fashion in relation to social and 
cultural environments. Study of American and international 
designers and innovators. Formerly TWENTIETH CENTU- 
RY FASHION. Prerequisites: FCS 225, 226. 

364 BASIC SKILLS IN COUNSELING 
3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to the basic procedures and skills of counseling 
from a multi-cultural context. Not for credit if taken SED 
362, 363. 



104 



Family and Consumer Sciences; Health Sciences 



365 APPAREL COLLECTION DEVELOPMENT 
3 sem. hrs. 

Advanced problem solving in apparel collection design 
with emphasis on integration of various tools of design. 
Lecture and lab. Formerly DESIGN STUDIO. Prerequisites: 
FCS 122, 228, 321 or consent instructor. 

366 CAD FOR APPAREL DESIGN 
3 sem. hrs. 

Application of art principles to apparel design using CAD. 
Apparel idea development from concept through applica- 
tion to production. Portfolio development. Lecture and lab. 
Prerequisites: FCS 122, 226, 228. 

368 FASHION PROMOTION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Apparel merchandising techniques with emphasis on visual 
merchandising, advertising, fashion shows, and related pro- 
motional activities. Prerequisite: FCS 226. 

369 MERCHANDISE PLANNING AND CONTROL 

3 sem. hrs. 

The financial management of merchandising fashion 
goods, with emphasis on stock, sales, assortment planning 
and control. Formerly FASHION MERCHANDISING. Pre- 
requisites: FCS 226; MKT 230, 335; MQM 220. 

370 INTERIOR DESIGN II: STUDIO 

4 sem. hrs. 

The process of linking spaces using architectural elements. 
Emphasizing the design process as it affects private and public 
spaces. Field trips required. Materials charge optional. Pre- 
requisites: FCS 340. FCS 218; TEC 217; and ART/FCS 352 
concurrent registration recommended. 

371 ADVANCED MERCHANDISING 

3 sem. hrs. 

Merchandising practices as related to current issues in 
management, entrepreneurship, as well as planning, devel- 
oping, and presenting soft good lines. Formerly FASHION 
MERCHANDISING II Prerequisite: FCS 369. 

375 INTERIOR DESIGN III: STUDIO 

4 sem. hrs. 

Study of design theory/analysis in relation to large-scale, 
comprehensive commercial interiors. Emphasis on codes 
regulating ergonomic and life safety issues. Materials charge 
optional. Prerequisite: FCS 370. 

380 ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION 
OF VOCATIONAL COOPERATIVE 
EDUCATION PROGRAMS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Planning and organizing a cooperative program; emphasis 
on recruitment, selection of training stations, student place- 
ment, and operation of cooperative plan. Also offered as 
BTE 380. Includes Clinical Experience: 5 hours, Type 10. 

382 COORDINATION TECHNIQUES 
OF COOPERATIVE VOCATIONAL 
EDUCATION PROGRAMS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Coordination techniques needed for high school and post-sec- 
ondary teacher coordination in integrating classroom activities 
with daily employment. Also offered as BTE 382 and TEC 
306. Includes Clinical Experience: 5 hours, Type 10. 



394 HEALTH ASPECTS OF AGING 
3 sem. hrs. 

Characteristics of the aging process and factors influencing 
adaptations and the quality of living. Also offered as 
HSC/KNR 394. 

398 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: FAMILY 
AND CONSUMER SCIENCES 
2-4 sem. hrs. 

Planned and supervised work experience in government, com- 
munity, business, or industry. May be repeated once. Prerequi- 
sites: Junior/senior standing (74 hours); FCS 200 and 50 
percent sequence completed; 2.00 overall GPA on date of 
application. See advisor for additional requirements. Placement 
is not guaranteed. Prior consent department chair required. 

398.01 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: CHILD 
DEVELOPMENT AND 

FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS 

398.02 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 
CONSUMER SCIENCES 

398.03 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 
FOOD— NUTRITION OR DIETETICS 

398.04 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 
INTERIOR AND 
ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN 



398.05 



PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: APPAREL 
MERCHANDISING AND DESIGN 



HEALTH SCIENCES (HSC) 522 

305 Felmley Hall, Phone: (309) 438-8329 
Facsimile: (309) 438-2450 
Web address: HealthSciences.IllinoisState.edu 
Email address: hscinfo@ilstu.edu 

Chairperson: Marilyn Morrow. 
Tenured/Tenure-track Faculty: 

Professor. Bierma, Broadbear. 

Associate Professor. Barham, Byrns, Jin, Micke, Miller, 

Morrow, Temple, Waterstraat, Woeste. 

Assistant Professor: Brown, Fuller, Grieshaber, Van Draska. 

General Department Information 

HONORS IN HEALTH SCIENCES 

The Department offers honors study to qualified students 
who will pursue an individualized course of study. To qualify, 
students must be declared majors in the Department, have com- 
pleted 30 hours of credit, have and maintain a minimum cumu- 
lative 3.50 GPA; and have and maintain a 3.50 GPA in the 
major. To graduate with Departmental Honors, students must 
be a member of the University Honors Program and complete 
1 2 credit hours of honors work in Health Sciences courses 
selected from at least two of the following options: Honors 
Undergraduate Research, Honors Independent Study, in-course 
Honors, or Honors Undergraduate Teaching Assistant. Students 
interested in the Honors Program must contact the departmental 
advisor to complete an orientation and planning meeting. 



Environmental Health Program 

Web site: 

HealthSciences.IllinoisState.edu/Environmental_Health 

Degree Offered: B.S. 

Environmental Health specialists identify and resolve 
problems that occur when humans interact with their envi- 
ronment. Some of these environmental problems include 
indoor and outdoor air pollution, water pollution, food conta- 
mination, hazardous wastes, insect-borne diseases, occupa- 
tional hazards, and chemical or biological terrorism. 
Environmental Health specialists identify, implement, and 
evaluate the best methods of controlling or preventing these 
problems. Employment opportunities include private con- 
sulting firms; industry; non-profit organizations; and local, 
state, or federal agencies. 

New Freshmen, New and Internal Transfer Admission 
Requirements: 

Entering freshmen, transfer students and internal trans- 
fer students (current Illinois State students wanting to 
change their major or minor) desiring admission to the 
Environmental Health (EH) program must meet admission 
requirements established by the University. Internal transfer 
students must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.00. 
Students should schedule an appointment with the depart- 
mental academic advisor for information. 

Standards for Progress in the Major: 

Students must maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.00 to be 
retained in the major. 

Accreditation: 

The Environmental Health program is accredited by the 
National Environmental Health Science and Protection 
Accreditation Council, www.ehacoffice.org/. 

MAJOR IN ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH 

— 42 hours in Health Sciences required. 

— Required courses (18 hours): HSC 145, 156, 204*, 249, 
258,355. 

— Professional Practice (9 hours): 398.01 . 

— Group 1 elective courses (15 hours): HSC 248, 252, 254, 
257, 322, 350, 359. 

— Group 2 (additional) elective courses (3 hours): HSC 271, 
378, 381, 383; CHE 215, 242, 280; ECO 255; HIS 240; 
GEO 102, 276, 336. Additional courses may be approved 
by the program director. 

— Required courses outside of Health Sciences (15 hours, 
excluding required General Education courses): CHE 
141, 220; KNR 182; MAT 119. 

— Required General Education courses (20 hours): BSC 160; 
CHE 140; HSC 156; MAT 120 or 145; PHY 105 or 108. 

— *NOTE: General Education courses MQM 100 or 
either ECO 138, GEO 138, POL 138, or PSY 138 may 
be substituted for HSC 204. 



Health Sciences 
MINOR IN ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH 



105 



— 15 hours in Health Sciences required. 

— Required courses (6 hours): HSC 145, 156**. 

— Elective courses (9 hours): HSC 248, 249, 252, 254, 
257, 258, 322, 350, 359, 383 (no more than 6 hours 
from HSC 248, 359 and 383 may be counted towards 
the minor). 

— Required courses outside of Health Sciences: (a mini- 
mum of 11 hours): CHE 140**, 141; MAT 119 or 
120** or 145**. 

**NOTE: CHE 140, MAT 120, 145; and HSC 156 are 
General Education courses. 

Health Education Program 

Web site: 

HealthSciences.IllinoisState.edu/Health_Education 

Degrees Offered: B.S., B.S. in Ed. 

Health Educators work with people in schools and 
community settings. They promote positive health behav- 
iors by giving presentations, planning and implementing 
programs, preparing instructional materials, assessing 
individual health needs, teaching and training, coordinat- 
ing community/school efforts, and acting as a resource 
person. Every Health Education major completes a core of 
21 hours and either a sequence in school health education 
or community health education. 

New Freshmen, New and Internal Transfer Admission 
Requirements: 

New freshmen and transfer students desiring admission to 
the Health Education (HED) program must meet the admission 
requirements established by the University. Those students 
wishing to be admitted into the School Health sequence of 
Health Education must apply for and be admitted into the Uni- 
versity Professional Studies program (see Teacher Education 
Admission and Retention in this Undergraduate Catalog). Stu- 
dents currently enrolled at the University who wish to 
change their major or minor to HED must have a minimum 
cumulative GPA of 2.50, though this minimum GPA does not 
guarantee admission. Transfer students and internal transfer 
students should schedule an appointment with the departmental 
academic advisor for information. 

Standards for Progress in the Major and Minor: 

School Health Education Sequence: All students should 
have a projected program plan completed in consultation with 
the departmental academic advisor. A minimum cumulative 
and major GPA of 2.50 is required for admission to Student 
Teaching as well as for retention in the Health Education pro- 
gram. Admission to Professional Studies is contingent upon 
recommendation of Health Education faculty and the Teacher 
Education Coordinator following completion of the Clinical 
Experience in HSC 391. Those majors in the School Health 
Education Sequence must also complete a second teaching 
endorsement with a minimum GPA of 2.50. Contact the 
departmental advisor for specific information. 



106 



Health Sciences 



Community Health Education Sequence: All students 
should have a projected program plan completed in consulta- 
tion with the departmental academic advisor. A minimum 
cumulative and major GPA of 2.50 is required for retention 
in the Community Health Education program as well as for 
enrollment in Professional Practice, HSC 398.02. 

Minors in Health Education: Minors in either Commu- 
nity Health Education or School Health Education should 
have a projected program plan completed in consultation with 
the departmental academic advisor. A minimum cumulative 
minor GPA of 2.50 is required for retention in the program. 

CLINICAL EXPERIENCES IN SCHOOL HEALTH 
EDUCATION 

Clinical Experiences are provided in off-campus clinical 
teaching centers, in local schools and in campus laboratory 
schools, in agencies and other approved non-school settings. 
All students will show verification of having completed pre- 
sident teaching field experiences commensurate with 
attaining local, state, and national standards. Students must 
provide their own transportation to Clinical Experience sites 

The approximate number of clinical hours and type of 
activity associated with each course offering can be found 
with the appropriate course description. The following 
legend relates to the type and kind of activity related to a 
specific course. 

Clinical Experiences Legend 

1 . Observation 

2. Tutoring one-on-one contact 

3. Non-instruction assisting 

4. Instructional aiding a group 

5. Micro teaching 

6. Simulation lab exercises 

7. Work with clinic client 

8. Graduate practicum 

9. Professional meeting 

10. Other 

Accreditation: 

The School Health Education curriculum is accredited by 
the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education 
(NCATE), www.ncate.org/. It is also accredited by the Ameri- 
can Association for Health Education (AAHE), www.aah- 
perd.org/aahe/template.cfm. The Community Health 
Education curriculum has been approved through combined 
review of two health education professional organizations. 

MAJOR IN HEALTH EDUCATION 

— 56 total hours (School Health Education) or 57 total 
hours (Community Health Education) required. 

— Required core courses (21 hours) including: HSC 190, 
290, 292, 293, 294, 390; SOC 123. 

Health Education majors must also complete either the 
School Health Education Sequence or the Community 
Health Education Sequence. 



School Health Education Sequence: 

This sequence is part of the program leading to a 
6-12 secondary certificate. 

— Required courses (6 hours): HSC 387, 391 (3 hours). 

— Elective (3 hours): 1 course selected from: FCS 102; 
HSC 105, 156*, 170*, 296. 

— Students must complete a second teaching area, including 
all Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) requirements 
for certification in that content area, and the Professional 
Education requirements (26 hours, including 12 hours of 
student teaching) as described in the Teacher Education 
requirements section of this Undergraduate Catalog and 
the General Education requirements. A 2.50 cumulative 
and major GPA is required for admission to Professional 
Studies and for student teaching. 

NOTE: This major does not meet middle-level endorsement 
requirements for the State of Illinois. See advisor for infor- 
mation on this endorsement. 

* Course is a General Education option. 

Community Health Education Sequence: 

— Required courses (27 hours): *BSC 145**; HSC 204.01, 
286, 296, 395, 396, 398.02. 

— Electives (9 hours) chosen in consultation with an advi- 
sor from the following: FCS 102; HSC 105, 156**, 
170**, 208**, 387, 394. 

— 2.50 cumulative and major GPA prior to the semester of 
enrollment in HSC 398.02. 

*BSC 145 meets General Education requirement for OC-SMT. 
**Course is a General Education option. 

MINOR IN HEALTH EDUCATION 

Minor in School Health Education: 

— 26 hours required. 

— Required courses (23 hours): HSC 190, 290, 292, 293, 
294, 390, 391 (2 hours); SOC 123. 

— Electives (3 hours): FCS 102; HSC 156*, 170*, 296, 387. 
*Course is a General Education option. 

The School Health Education Minor does not lead direct- 
ly to teacher certification. Students seeking an additional 
teaching endorsement in this academic area should contact 
their advisor or the Illinois State Board of Education website 
(www.isbe.net) for specific certification requirements. 

Minor in Community Health Education: 

— 24 hours required. 

— Required courses (18 hours): HSC 190, 290, 292, 293, 
294, 296. 

— Electives (6 hours): 2 courses from: FCS 102; HSC 
105, 156*, 170*, 208*, 387, 394. Other advanced-level 
Health Sciences courses may be substituted as electives 
with consent of Health Sciences advisor 

*Course is a General Education option. 

The Community Health Education Minor does not 
lead directly to teacher certification. Students seeking an 



additional teaching endorsement in this academic area 
should contact their advisor or the Illinois State Board of 
Education website (www.isbe.net) for specific certifica- 
tion requirements. 

Health Information 
Management Program 

Web site: 

HealthSciences.IllinoisState.edu/Health_Info_Management 

Degree Offered: B.S. 

Health information managers are professionals responsi- 
ble for the management of health data and health informa- 
tion systems in health care organizations and organizations 
that use health data. They ensure data quality; code and clas- 
sify data; maintain data security and privacy; design, imple- 
ment and manage health information systems (both manual 
and electronic); evaluate medical care data to monitor quali- 
ty and risk; and manage support personnel. 

MAJOR IN HEALTH INFORMATION 
MANAGEMENT 

The Health Information Management (HIM) major pro- 
gram offers two sequences to students who are seeking to 
earn a Bachelor of Science degree in Health Information 
Management. The sequences are the HIM On-Campus 
Sequence and the RHIT-HIM Online Sequence. 

HIM On-Campus Sequence: This sequence is designed for 
and restricted to students who are taking HIM courses on 
campus. 

New Freshmen, New and Internal Transfer Admission 
Requirements: 

New freshmen, transfer students and internal transfers 
(current Illinois State students wanting to change their major) 
desiring admission to the Health Information Management 
Program must meet the admission requirements established by 
the University. Students currently enrolled at Illinois State Uni- 
versity who wish to change their major to Health Information 
Management (HIM) and transfer students seeking admission to 
the HIM Program should see the Health Sciences Depart- 
ment's academic advisor for information. 

Admission and Retention in the HIM On-Campus 
Sequence: 

To be admitted and retained in the HIM major a student 
must: 

— Be in good academic standing in the University with a 
minimum cumulative 2.00 GPA; 

— Have a grade of C or better in the following courses, or 
their equivalents, to enroll in the HIM professional 
courses: KNR 181 and 182 and HSC 105; 

— Maintain a minimum cumulative 2.00 GPA for retention 
in the major; and 

— Earn grades of C or better in all major courses. 



Health Sciences 107 

Course Requirements for the HIM On-Campus Sequence: 

— Prerequisite courses (12-14 hours): ECO 101 or 103 or 
105; HSC 105; KNR 181 and 182. 

- Major courses (58 hours): HSC 200, 201, 202, 204*, 
210, 212, 213, 214, 230, 298.03, 300, 310, 320, 340, 
345, 346, 398.03; ENG 145.13 or 249; MQM 220, 323. 

- Recommended courses: BSC 145; ITK 150. 

*NOTE: General Education courses MQM 100 or ECO 

138, GEO 138, POL 138, or PSY 138 may be substituted for 
HSC 204. 

RHIT-HIM Online Sequence: 

This sequence is designed for and restricted to students 
who have completed an associate degree program in health 
information technology (HIT) and are currently certified as 
Registered Health Information Technicians (RHIT). The 
Sequence is designed to give these students an opportunity 
to earn a Bachelor of Science Degree in Health Information 
Management in six semesters. All HIM courses will be 
delivered online via distance learning. Students will be 
expected to complete one course each semester. 

Admission and Retention in the RHIT-HIM Online 
Sequence: 

To be admitted and retained in the RHIT-HIM Online 
Sequence, a student must: 

— Be admitted to Illinois State University; 

— Be a graduate of an associate degree program in health 
information technology accredited by the Commission 
on the Accreditation of Health Informatics and Informa- 
tion Management Education (CAHIIM); 

— Be currently certified as a Registered Health Informa- 
tion Technician; 

— Complete the Associate Degree in Arts (A.A.) or an 
Associate Degree in Science (A.S.) or the Illinois Trans- 
ferable General Education Core Curriculum; 

— Maintain a minimum cumulative 2.00 GPA for retention 
in the HIM major; and 

— Earn grades of C or better in all HIM major courses. 

Course Requirements in the RHIT-HIM Online Sequence: 

— Major courses (64 hours): HSC 326, 327, 328, 329, 330, 
and 398.03; and 33 semester hours earned as Proficien- 
cy Credit; 

— A grade of C or better is required in all HIM courses for 
retention in the major. 

Health information technology courses are held as Profi- 
ciency Credit for the student until successful completion 
of three specified Health Information Management upper- 
division courses: HSC 326, 327 and 328. Once these three 
courses have been successfully completed with a grade of 
C or better through enrollment, thirty-three (33) credit 
hours are placed on the student's transcript as Proficiency 
Credit for the following Health Information Management 
courses: HSC 105, 200, 201, 202, 210, 212, 214, 230, and 
298.03; KNR 181 and KNR 182. 



108 



Health Sciences 



Accreditation and Credentialing: 

The HIM Program is accredited by the Commission on 
Accreditation of Health Informatics and Information Man- 
agement (www.cahiim.org). Graduates of the program are 
eligible and expected to write the national registry examina- 
tion. Successful completion of the registry examination leads 
to the Registered Health Information Administrator (RHIA) 
professional designation. 

Medical Laboratory Science 
Program 

Web site: HealthSciences.IllinoisState.edu/MLS 
Degree Offered: B.S. 

Medical laboratory scientists work as a part of the 
medical team. They analyze body fluids and perform tests 
using highly specialized equipment to diagnose diseases 
and monitor treatment. They are largely employed in hos- 
pitals and private clinical laboratories and industry. Grad- 
uates of the program are eligible for national certification. 

New Freshmen and New and Internal Transfer Admission 
Requirements: 

New freshmen, new transfer students, and internal trans- 
fer students (current Illinois State students wanting to change 
their majors) desiring admittance to the Medical Laboratory 
Science (MLS) program must meet the admission require- 
ments established by the University. Internal transfer stu- 
dents must also have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.00. 
NOTE: Evidence of hepatitis B immunization or waiver is 
required for enrollment in professional practice. 

Standards for Progress in the Major: 

MLS majors must earn grades of C or better in all courses 
required by the major and maintain a minimum cumulative 
GPA of 2.00 or better to be retained in the program. 

PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE IN MEDICAL 
LABORATORY SCIENCE 

Professional Practice is provided off-campus in clini- 
cal facilities affiliated with the University. The experience 
involves technical instruction in clinical hematology, 
chemistry, blood banking, microbiology and other aspects 
of laboratory medicine. Students are responsible to provide 
their own transportation and housing during the Profession- 
al Practice experience. Students apply for acceptance into 
the clinical experience during the spring of the junior year. 
Students must have maintained a cumulative 2.00 GPA and 
have received a grade of C or better in all required courses 
to be eligible for professional practice. 

Two Professional Practice options are available: the 
Standard Track and the Alternative Track. The Standard 
Track is professional practice in the fall and advanced course- 
work in the spring semester. The Alternative Track is a 10-12 



month experience in an accredited hospital-based program 
which includes both lecture and laboratory practice through- 
out. Enrollment in the Alternative Track is extremely limited 
(see the program director for further details). See the Medical 
Laboratory Science Student Handbook for more information 
and a current list of Standard Track and Alternative Track 
locations. Students must complete an entire set of Profession- 
al Practice courses (Standard Track or Alternative Track) to 
be eligible for graduation and national certification. 

Criminal Background Check: 

All Medical Laboratory Science students applying to 
the Standard Track Professional Practice are required to pass 
a criminal background check. The complete policy is out- 
lined in the Medical Laboratory Science Student Handbook. 

MAJOR IN MEDICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE 

— 73 hours as specified below. 

— Required courses (18 hours): HSC 260, 261, 262, 263, 
308 and either the Standard or Alternative Track: 
Standard Track required courses (32 hours): HSC 
301, 302, 312, 315, 316, 317, 318, 319, 325, 398.22, 
398.23, 398.24, 398.27, 398.28, 398.29. 

Standard Track elective courses (8 hours): BSC 170, 
181 (or KNR 181), 182 (or KNR 182), 196, 203, 219, 
220, 283; CHE 215, 242; PHY 105, 108. 
Alternative Track required courses (32 hours): HSC 
331, 332, 333, 334, 335, 336, 337, 338, 339. 
Alternative Track elective courses (8 hours; 3 hours 
must be from CHE): BSC 170, 181 (or KNR 181), 182 (or 
KNR 182), 196, 203, 219, 220, 283; CHE 215, 242. 

— Required courses outside Health Sciences (17 hours): 
BSC 160 or 260; CHE 141, 220. 

— Required General Education courses (12 hours): BSC 
197; CHE 140; MAT 120. 

— Strongly recommended courses: HSC 105, 204.02, and 
ITK 150. 

— NOTE: This major may require more hours than indi- 
cated due to prerequisites or lack of prior skill. 

A.A.S. to B.S. Degree: 

Persons possessing an Applied Associate of Science 
degree in clinical (medical) laboratory technology from an 
Illinois community college may complete a B.S. through the 
Illinois Articulation Initiative. To qualify, students must be 
certified as a medical laboratory technician by the American 
Society for Clinical Pathology or as a clinical laboratory 
technician by the National Credentialing Agency. Qualified 
students are awarded proficiency credit for some of the 
A.A.S. courses. Interested students should contact the Med- 
ical Laboratory Science program director for details. 

Accreditation: 

The Medical Laboratory Science program is accredited 
by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory 
Sciences, www.naacls.org/, 5600 N. River Road, Ste. 720, 
Rosemont, IL 60018, Phone (773) 714- 



Health Sciences 



109 



Safety Program 

Web site: HealthSciences.IllinoisState.edu/Safety 

Degree Offered: B.S. 

Safety professionals apply principles drawn from such 
disciplines as technology, the sciences, management, com- 
munication, health, and education to reduce the risk of 
harm to people, property and the environment. Safety pro- 
fessionals have the knowledge and skills to identify, evalu- 
ate, and cost-effectively control or prevent the hazards that 
can produce harm to people, property and the environment. 
Successful safety professionals are effective communica- 
tors with strong "people skills." Safety professionals are 
employed in a variety of public and private sector assign- 
ments, including manufacturing, insurance, construction, 
government, and consulting. 

New Freshmen, New and Internal Transfer Admission 
Requirements: 

New freshmen, transfer students and internal transfer 
students (current Illinois State students wanting to change 
their major) desiring admission to the Safety (SAF) pro- 
gram must meet the admission requirements established 
by the University. Students currently enrolled at Illinois 
State who wish to change their major to SAF must have a 
minimum cumulative GPA of 2.00. Students should see 
the Department academic advisor for information. 

Standards for Progress in the Major: 

A minimum cumulative GPA of 2.00 is required for 
retention in the program. All students should have a pro- 
jected plan of study completed in consultation with the 
departmental academic advisor. 

Professional Affiliation: 

Professional affiliation is with the American Society of 
Safety Engineers (ASSE), Central Illinois Chapter, Illinois 
State University student section, www.asse.org/index.html. 

MAJOR IN SAFETY 

— 48 hours in Health Sciences required. 

— Required courses (33 hours): HSC 248, 271, 359, 362, 
370, 372, 378, 380, 381, 382, 385. 

— Professional Practice (9 hours): HSC 398.04. 

— Two elective courses selected from the following (6 
hours): HSC 272, 383, 384. 

— Required courses outside of Health Sciences (10 hours): 
CHE 141; KNR 182; TEC 130. 

— Required General Education courses: CHE 140; 
MAT 120; PHY 105 or 108; and one of the follow- 
ing: MQM 100; ECO 138, GEO 138, POL 138, or 
PSY 138*. 

— Recommended electives based on career goals (vari- 
able): BSC 160; CHE 220; ENG 145.13 or 249; FIL 
250; HSC 145, 156, 247; KNR 181, 282, 342**. 

*NOTE: *HSC 204.02 may be substituted, but is not a 

General Education course. 
**KNR 181, 182, and 282 are prerequisites for KNR 342. 



MINOR IN SAFETY 



2 1 hours in Health Sciences required. 

Required courses (6 hours): HSC 271, 381. 

Elective courses selected from the following (15 hours): 

HSC 248, 272, 359, 362, 370, 372, 378, 380, 382, 383, 

384, 385. 

Required courses outside of Health Sciences (12-14 

hours): CHE 110, 112 or CHE 140; MAT 120; PHY 

105 or 108. 



Health Sciences Courses 

105 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Study of basic language related to medical science and 
allied health specialties with emphasis on word analysis, 
construction, definitions, pronunciation, spelling, and stan- 
dard abbreviations. 

145 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH PRACTICE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to problem-solving tools and skills used in the 
practice of environmental health from the perspective of 
waste in society. Not for credit if had HSC 247. Prerequi- 
site: Major/minor or consent of instructor. 

156 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH IN 
THE 21ST CENTURY: MEETING 
THE GLOBAL CHALLENGE OC-SMT 

3 sem. hrs. 

Application of scientific methods of inquiry to understand 
environmental problems as they affect public health and 
personal well-being. Not for credit if had HSC 155. Prereq- 
uisite: Inner Core. 

170 SAFETY AND SOCIETY OC-SS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Examines the impact of the social sciences upon safety and 
accident prevention. Focuses on cultural influences from a 
global perspective. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or concurrent 
registration or COM 1 10 or concurrent registration. 

176 INTRODUCTION TO 

MOTORCYCLE SAFETY 
1 sem. hrs. 

Classroom and laboratory experiences provide basic 
knowledge, skills, and techniques necessary for the safe 
operation of a motorcycle. Not for credit major/minor. 

190 FOUNDATIONS OF HEALTH EDUCATION 
3 sem. hrs. 

The historical and philosophical perspectives of the develop- 
ment of Health Education. A comparison of the major con- 
cepts and theories of health and characteristics of health 
education programs in schools and communities. Prerequi- 
site: Health Education major/minor only. 

200 HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Understanding the role and requirements of information 
technology in health information management. Prerequi- 
sites: HSC 105, 201 and 210. Major only. 








Health Sciences 



201 PATHOPHYSIOLOGY I 
3 sem. hrs. 

Study of human disease processes, including the diagnosis, 
treatment and management of patients. Prerequisites: HSC 
105; KNR 181 and 182. HCS major only. 

202 PATHOPHYSIOLOGY II 
3 sem. hrs. 

Continuation of HSC 201. Prerequisite: HSC 201. 

204 HEALTH DATA ANALYSIS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Theory and practice of analysis and presentation of data for 
management and research in the Health Sciences. Prerequi- 
site: HCS major only. 

208 DYNAMICS OF UNITED STATES 

CONTEMPORARY HEALTH ISSUES OC-SMT 

3 sem. hrs. 

Exploration and analysis of current health and lifestyle 
issues. Emphasis on how individuals, communities and soci- 
ety make health decisions. Also offered as FCS/KNR 208. 
Prerequisites: Inner Core and MC-IS category. 

210 INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH 
INFORMATION MANAGEMENT 
3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction of health information management principles, 
policies and procedures including health data content, collec- 
tion, quality, registries, access, and retention. Lecture and lab. 
Prerequisites: HSC 105; KNR 181 and 182. 

212 HEALTH DATA CLASSIFICATION 
AND INDEXING SYSTEMS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to the application of diagnosis and procedure 
classification systems and indexing systems. Prerequisites: 
HSC 201 and 210. 

213 ADVANCED APPLICATIONS OF HEALTH 
DATA CLASSIFICATIONS 

AND INDEXING SYSTEMS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Application of advanced concepts in classification and 
indexing systems including quality and performance moni- 
toring. Prerequisites: HSC 202, 212, and 298.03. 

214 HEALTHCARE CLASSIFICATION SYSTEMS 
AND REIMBURSEMENT PROCESSES 

3 sem. hrs. 

Application and analysis of specialized diagnosis and proce- 
dure classification systems for healthcare reimbursement 
processes. Formerly ALTERNATIVE CLASSIFICATION 
SYSTEMS Prerequisites: HSC 213 and 298.03. 

230 LEGAL ASPECTS OF HEALTH INFORMATION 
AND RISK MANAGEMENT 
3 sem. hrs. 

Review and application of laws, policies, procedures and 
practices applying to the legal aspects of health information 
and risk management. Prerequisites: HSC 105 and 210 or 
consent instructor. Major only. 

248 OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH 
3 sem. hrs. 

Adverse environmental conditions encountered in the work- 
place affecting the efficiency, health, and well-being of 
employees. 



249 ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Toxicants such as heavy metals, gases, vapors, dusts, pesti- 
cides, food additives, and their effects on health and the envi- 
ronment. Formerly HSC 349. Prerequisites: CHE 140, 141; 
MAT 120 or 145; CHE 220 or concurrent registration; KNR 
182 and HSC 145. 

252 WATER AND 

WASTEWATER CONTROL 

3 sem. hrs. 

Protection of water quality for human and ecosystem 
needs, and the control of wastewater. Lecture and lab. 
Materials charge optional. Formerly HSC 352; WATER 
QUALITY AND TREATMENT. Not for credit if had HSC 
247. Prerequisites: CHE 140 and 141; MAT 120 or 145; 
HSC 145; BSC 160 or concurrent registration. 

254 CONTROL OF INSTITUTIONAL 
ENVIRONMENTS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Environmental health aspects of hospitals, nursing homes, 
penal institutions, schools, colleges and universities. Control 
of physical, chemical and microbiological hazards. Lecture 
and lab. Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: CHE 140; 
CHE 141 or concurrent registration; HSC 145; BSC 160 or 
concurrent registration. 

257 AIR QUALITY AND 
POLLUTION CONTROL 

3 sem. hrs. 

Air contaminants found in the ambient air, workplace, 
and home, including health effects, measurement, and 
control. Lecture and lab. Materials charge optional. For- 
merly HSC 357. Prerequisites: CHE 140, 141 or concur- 
rent registration; MAT 119; KNR 182 or concurrent 
registration; HSC 145. 

258 EPIDEMIOLOGY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Principles and methods governing the surveillance and 
investigation of disease and injury in human populations. 
Prerequisites: MAT 1 19; BSC 160 or 260 or concurrent reg- 
istration; HSC 145 and 204. 

260 INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL 
IMMUNOHEMATOLOGY 

3 sem. hrs. 

Basic principles and procedures of immunohematology 
(blood banking). Lecture and lab. Materials charge optional. 
Formerly INTRODUCTION TO THE MEDICAL LABORA- 
TORY: IMMUNOHEMATOLOGY AND SEROLOGY. Pre- 
requisites: HSC 261, 262, 263. Major only; junior standing. 
CHE 220 recommended. 

261 INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL 
HEMATOLOGY 

4 sem. hrs. 

Basic principles of hematology and body fluid analysis. Lec- 
ture and lab. Materials charge optional. Formerly INTRO- 
DUCTION TO THE MEDICAL LABORATORY: 
HEMATOLOGY. Prerequisites: BSC 197; CHE 140 and 
141; concurrent registration in HSC 262, 263. Major only; 
junior standing. CHE 220 recommended. 



Health Sciences 



111 



262 INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL CHEMISTRY 
4 sem. hrs. 

Basic principles and procedures of clinical chemistry and uri- 
nalysis. Lecture and lab. Materials charge optional. Formerly 
INTRODUCTION TO THE MEDICAL LABORATORY: 
APPLIED CLINICAL ANALYSIS. Prerequisites: BSC 197; 
CHE 140 and 141; concurrent registration in HSC 261, 263. 
Major only; junior standing. CHE 220 recommended. 

263 INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Basic principles and procedures of immunology and serolo- 
gy. Lecture and lab. Materials charge optional. Prerequi- 
sites: BSC 197; CHE 140 and 141; concurrent registration in 
HSC 261, 262. Major only; junior standing. CHE 220 rec- 
ommended. 

271 SAFETY TECHNOLOGY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Controlling production costs due to accidents. Addresses 
legislation, worker's compensation, hazard recognition, and 
safety planning. Includes basic engineering solutions. Pre- 
requisites: CHE 102 or 1 10 and CHE 1 12 or 140; MAT 120 
or 121 or 145. 

272 CONSTRUCTION SAFETY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Addresses employee safety training requirements, recordkeep- 
ing, hazard recognition, safety inspections, and program plan- 
ning in the construction industry. Prerequisite: MAT 120. 

286 NEEDS ASSESSMENT IN 
HEALTH EDUCATION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Emphasis on procedures which identify Health Education 
priorities of populations in various settings. Examination of 
health needs of select populations. Prerequisites: HSC 190. 
Health Education major/minor only. 

290 STRATEGIES IN HEALTH EDUCATION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Examination of the educational process, methods, strategies, 
and techniques in Health Education, communication tech- 
niques and current resources. Topics: .01, Community Health; 
.02, School Health. Includes Clinical Experience: 5 hours, 
Type 1, 3, 5. Prerequisites: Major/minor only. HSC 190. 

292 COMMUNITY PUBLIC HEALTH 
3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to community public health at local, state, 
and national levels. Includes emphasis on community 
health problems, institutions and resources. Prerequisites: 
Major/minor only. 

293 PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN DISEASE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Emphasis on human disease processes with special focus 
on cardiovascular and respiratory systems and the implica- 
tions for health education. Not for credit if had HSC 297. 
Prerequisite: Health Education major/minor only. 

294 DISEASES OF THE HUMAN BODY 
3 sem. hrs. 

The course explores human diseases affecting various body 
systems including the nervous, digestive, reproductive, 
skeletal and integumentary. Not for credit if had HSC 297. 
Prerequisites: HSC 293. Health Education major/minor only. 



296 CONCEPTS IN HEALTH EDUCATION 
3 sem. hrs. 

An examination of health determinants, major theories, and 
models of health behavior. Application to Health Education 
programming will be emphasized. Prerequisites: HSC 190. 
Major/minor only. 

298.03 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: HEALTH 
INFORMATION MANAGEMENT: 
CLINICAL INTERNSHIP 

3 sem. hrs. 

Rotation and project assignments in hospital medical records 
departments. Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C in HSC 
200, 202, 212, 230. Major only and consent program director. 

300 HEALTH INFORMATION SYSTEMS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Management and analysis of health data using health infor- 
mation systems. Prerequisites: HSC 200 and 298.03; ENG 
145.13 or 249 or concurrent registration. Major only. 

301 INTRODUCTION TO COAGULATION 
AND HEMOSTASIS 

2 sem. hrs. 

Principles and test procedures related to blood coagulation 
and hemostasis. Correlation of test results in disease states. 
Materials charge optional. Formerly HSC 361. Prerequi- 
site: HSC 261. 

302 INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL BIOCHEMISTRY 

3 sem. hrs. 

Theory and principles of advanced instrumentation and tech- 
niques used in reference, pharmaceutical, and biotechnology 
laboratories as related to disease diagnosis. Formerly CLINI- 
CAL INSTRUMENTATION Prerequisites: HSC 262 or con- 
sent instructor. 

308 INTRODUCTION TO 

CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY 

4 sem. hrs. 

Survey of medical microbiology with emphasis on common 
pathogens. Included are taxonomy, identification, culture 
methods, procedures and antibiotic susceptibility testing. 
Lecture and lab. Materials charge optional. Prerequisite: 
BSC 160 or 260. 

310 HEALTH INFORMATION 
MANAGEMENT SEMINAR 

1 sem. hr. 

Synthesis of program content in preparation for initial 
employment and the RHIA examination. Prerequisites: 
HSC 213, 298.03, and 345. Major only. 

312 CLINICAL CHEMISTRY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Concentrated laboratory instruction and theoretical applica- 
tions of clinical biochemistry. Current testing procedures, 
method comparison, and quality assurance are studied. For- 
merly CLINICAL BIOCHEMISTRY. Prerequisites: HSC 
262; MAT 120 or consent instructor. 

315 CLINICAL PARASITOLOGY 
AND MYCOLOGY 

2 sem. hrs. 

General techniques for identification of clinically significant 
parasites and fungi. Morphology, symptomology, and epi- 
demiology are stressed. Prerequisite: HSC 308. 




12 



Health Sciences 



316 CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE: 
RESEARCH DESIGN 

1 sem. hr. 

Research design in clinical laboratory science. Formerly 
CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE: SPECIAL TOP- 
ICS. Prerequisites: HSC 260, 261 and 262 or consent 
instructor. 

317 CLINICAL HEMATOLOGY 

2 sem. hrs. 

Advanced concepts in Hematology. Clinical correlation of 
test results and disease are emphasized. Prerequisites: HSC 
261,301. 

318 CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY 

2 sem. hrs. 

Comprehensive medical microbiology with emphasis on 
characterization of less common pathogens, interpreta- 
tion of clinical data and etiology. Prerequisites: HSC 
308 and BSC 260. 

319 CLINICAL IMMUNOHEMATOLOGY 

3 sem. hrs. 

Advanced concepts in Immunohematology. Donor criteria, 
component therapy, transfusion and problem solving are 
emphasized. Prerequisite: HSC 260. 

320 ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT OF 
HEALTH INFORMATION SERVICES 

3 sem. hrs 

Managerial decision making for planning, organizing, staffing, 
directing and controlling the functions, operations and resources 
of a health information department. Prerequisites: HSC 230, 
298.03, 300, 345 and 346; MQM 323. Major only. 

322 POLLUTION PREVENTION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Basic methods in pollution prevention as applied to 
industrial and nonindustrial settings. Prerequisites: HSC 
145; MAT 119. 

325 LABORATORY EDUCATION 

AND MANAGEMENT 

2 sem. hrs. 
Foundational concepts of education and management, with 
emphasis on philosophies, methods and techniques for pro- 
fessional application with practicum. Prerequisites: HSC 
260, 26 1 and 262 or consent instructor. 

326 HEALTHCARE FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT 
AND REIMBURSEMENT SYSTEMS 

6 sem. hrs. 

Analysis and application of principles and theories of finan- 
cial management and reimbursement systems utilized in the 
United States healthcare system. Prerequisites: RHIT-HIM 
Online Sequence only. 

327 HEALTHCARE QUALITY MANAGEMENT, 
LAW, AND RISK MANAGEMENT 

6 sem. hrs. 

Analysis and application of principles and theories concern- 
ing United States healthcare quality management, law, and 
risk management. Prerequisites: HSC 326. RHIT-HIM 
Online Sequence only. Minimum grade of C required in all 
prerequisite courses. 



328 PLANNING, IMPLEMENTATION AND 
MANAGEMENT OF HEALTH 
INFORMATION SYSTEMS 

6 sem. hrs. 

Addresses the Health Information manager's role and respon- 
sibilities in planning, implementing and managing health 
information systems to manage health data. Prerequisites: 
HSC 327. RHIT-HIM Online Sequence only. Minimum 
grade of C required in all prerequisite courses. 

329 MANAGEMENT FOR THE HEALTH 
INFORMATION ADMINISTRATOR 
5 sem. hrs. 

Organization and management of personnel and processes 
by health information administrators. Prerequisites: HSC 
328. RHIT-HIM Online Sequence only. Minimum grade of 
C required in all prerequisite courses. 

330 HEALTH DATA ANALYSIS FOR 
DECISION MAKING 

5 sem. hrs. 

Collect, analyze, and report clinical data to address adminis- 
trative problems and issues. Prerequisites: HSC 329. RHIT- 
HIM Online Sequence only. Minimum grade of C required 
in all prerequisite courses. 

331 APPLIED CLINICAL LABORATORY 
MANAGEMENT 

1-3 sem. hrs. 

Concentrated instruction in the fundamentals of laboratory 
management including regulatory, budgetary, personnel 
and educational issues. Lecture in a clinical setting. May 
repeat maximum 3 hours. Prerequisites: HSC 260, 261 and 
262 or consent of instructor. 

332 APPLIED CLINICAL BIOCHEMISTRY 
1-7 sem. hrs. 

Concentrated laboratory instruction in clinical biochemistry. 
Current testing procedures, instrumentation and quality 
assurance are studied. Lecture and lab in a clinical setting. 
Prerequisite: HSC 302. 

333 APPLIED CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY 
1-6 sem. hrs. 

Concentrated laboratory instruction in clinical serology and 
immunology. Current testing procedures, instrumentation and 
quality assurance are studied. Lecture and lab in a clinical 
setting. Formerly APPLIED CLINICAL SEROLOGY AND 
IMMUNOLOGY. Prerequisites: HSC 260 and 308. 

334 APPLIED CLINICAL URINALYSIS 
1-3 sem. hrs. 

Concentrated laboratory instruction in routine and special 
urinalysis procedures. Clinical lab only. Prerequisite: HSC 
262. 

335 APPLIED SPECIAL MICROBIOLOGY 
1-6 sem. hrs. 

Concentrated laboratory instruction in the identification of sig- 
nificant pathogens requiring unique identification methods. 
May include virology, parasitology or mycology. Lecture and 
lab in a clinical setting. Formerly APPLIED CLINICAL PAR- 
ASITOLOGY AND MYCOLOGY. Prerequisite: HSC 308. 



Health Sciences 



113 



336 CURRENT ISSUES IN CLINICAL 
LABORATORY SCIENCE 

1 sem. hr. 

Current topics and trends in clinical laboratory science. 
Emphasis on concepts of education and management for pro- 
fessional application. Lecture and lab in a clinical setting. Pre- 
requisites: HSC 260, 261 and 262 or consent instructor. 

337 APPLIED CLINICAL HEMATOLOGY 
1-6 sem. hrs. 

Concentrated laboratory instruction in clinical hematology 
and coagulation. Current testing procedures, instrumentation 
and quality assurance are studied. Lecture and lab in a clini- 
cal setting. Prerequisites: HSC 261 and 301. 

338 APPLIED CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY 
1-6 sem. hrs. 

Concentrated laboratory instruction in clinical microbiology, 
including identification of pathogens, culture methods, pro- 
cedures, antibiotic testing and interpretation of clinical data. 
Lecture and lab in a clinical setting. Prerequisite: HSC 308. 

339 APPLIED CLINICAL IMMUNOHEMATOLOGY 
1-4 sem. hrs. 

Concentrated laboratory instruction in blood bank. Current 
testing procedures, donor collection, preparation of blood 
components and quality assurance are studied. Lecture and lab 
in a clinical setting. Prerequisite: HSC 260. 

340 TRENDS IN HEALTH CARE DELIVERY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Review of emerging nontraditional and specialized health 
care facilities including organization characteristics, accredi- 
tation standards, regulatory requirements and health infor- 
mation applications. Prerequisites: HSC 210, 212, and 
298.03. Major only. 

345 QUALITY MANAGEMENT IN HEALTH CARE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Review and application of strategies to investigate, identify, 
assess, resolve and monitor performance using health data. 
Prerequisites: HSC 204, 210, 212, and 298.03 or consent 
instructor. Major only. 

346 HOSPITAL BUDGETING PROCEDURES 

3 sem. hrs. 

Systematic study of hospital planning; coordination of 
resources and expenditures; reimbursement methods. Prereq- 
uisites: HSC 200, 212, and 298.03 or consent instructor. 
Major only. 

350 FOOD PROTECTION 
3 sem. hrs. 

An intensive study of the laws, principles, and tech- 
niques applied in the protection of food and milk for 
human consumption. Lecture and lab. Materials charge 
optional. Prerequisites: HSC 145; BSC 160 or concur- 
rent registration. 

355 ENVTRONMENTAL HEALTH 
DECISION PROCESSES 
3 sem. hrs. 

Intensive study of the decision making techniques, organiza- 
tional structure, interagency relationships, program method- 
ologies, and legal aspects of environmental health practice. 
Prerequisites: HSC 145 and 156. Senior major in Environ- 
mental Health Program or consent instructor. 



359 INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Techniques for measurement, evaluation, and control of 
chemical and physical hazards in occupational environments. 
Lecture and lab. Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: 
HSC 248; MAT 120 or 145. 

362 ERGONOMICS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Overview of physical and psychological aspects of ergonom- 
ics, including workstation design, its role in accident causa- 
tion, and ergonomic-related injuries and illnesses. Lecture. 
Prerequisites: HSC 248 or 271; PHY 105 or 108. 

370 INDUSTRIAL SAFETY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Principles, responsibilities, and techniques for developing, 
organizing, implementing, and administering an industrial 
safety program. Formerly INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENT PRE- 
VENTION. Prerequisites: HSC 271; PHY 105 or 108. 

372 ACCIDENT/INCIDENT INVESTIGATION, 
RECORDS, AND EVALUATION 

3 sem. hrs. 

Theory, function and application of accident/incident investi- 
gation, reporting, and analysis systems. Form design, utiliza- 
tion and record keeping procedures. Prerequisites: PHY 105 
or 108; HSC 271 or concurrent registration. 

378 DISASTER PREPAREDNESS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Organizing, directing, coordinating disaster services in 
schools, industry, and local government. Includes a hands-on 
disaster exercise. Prerequisites: CHE 110 and 112 or CHE 
140; MAT 120 or consent instructor. 

380 FIRE PROTECTION AND PREVENTION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Measures related to safeguarding human life and preser- 
vation of property in prevention, detection, and suppres- 
sion of fire. Prerequisites: HSC 370 or concurrent 
registration. 

381 OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY 
AND HEALTH ACT (OSHA) 

3 sem. hrs. 

Interpretation of the provisions of the Occupational Safety 
and Health Act; the regulations, standards, and reporting 
requirements pursuant to it. Prerequisites: Junior/Senior 
standing; or consent instructor. 

382 IMPROVING SAFETY PERFORMANCE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Development of specialized knowledge and skills in prob- 
lem-solving; evaluation and implementation of occupational 
safety programs. Formerly SAFETY PERFORMANCE 
CONTROL. Prerequisites: HSC 370; MQM 100 or ECO or 
GEO or POL or PSY 138. 

383 AGRICULTURAL SAFETY AND HEALTH 
3 sem. hrs. 

Major problems of accident causation and prevention applic- 
able to agriculture and the need for farm safety education, 
engineering, and enforcement of countermeasures. Half-day 
field trip required. Also offered as AGR 383. Formerly 
A GRICUL TURAL A CCIDENT PRE VENTION Prerequi- 
sites: CHE 1 10 or 140, or consent instructor. 




14 



Health Sciences 



384 HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Overview of federal and state safety and environmental 
regulations dealing with hazardous materials in the work- 
place and community. Prerequisites: CHE 140; HSC 271. 

385 SYSTEM SAFETY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Risk and life cycle concept. Application of inductive and 
deductive analytical techniques for hazard identification and 
risk assessment. Prerequisites: HSC 204 or MQM 100 or 
ECO or GEO or POL or PSY 138. 

387 PROGRAMS IN SCHOOL HEALTH 
3 sem. hrs. 

Comprehensive school health education with major topics of 
health education, school health programs, and school com- 
munity collaboration. 

390 DRUGS IN SOCIETY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Psychological, social, medical, legal, and economic aspects 
of use, misuse, and abuse of substances will be explored 
along with the implications for education and prevention. 
Prerequisites: Health Education major/minor only. 
Junior/senior standing. 

391 CURRICULUM AND EVALUATION 
IN SCHOOL HEALTH 

2-3 sem. hrs. 

School health education standards, curriculum development 
and evaluation, student assessment and accommodation for 
student with special needs. Health Education majors are 
required to take 3 hours; Includes Clinical Experience: 35 
hours, Type 1, 2, 4. Health Education minors and other 
teaching majors enroll for 2 hours. Prerequisites: HSC 290; 
admission to Professional Studies. 

394 HEALTH ASPECTS OF AGING 
3 sem. hrs. 

Characteristics of the aging process and factors influencing 
adaptation and the quality of living. Also offered as 
FCS/KNR 394. 

395 MEDIA AND MATERIALS 
IN HEALTH EDUCATION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Analysis and development of print and non-print materials 
and their use by health educators. Prerequisite: HSC 286. 
HSC major only. 

396 HEALTH EDUCATION PROGRAM 
PLANNING AND EVALUATION 

3 sem. hrs. 

Theory and application of Health Education planning and pro- 
motion. Grantsmanship and evaluation will be emphasized. 
Prerequisites: HSC 286. HSC major only. 

398.01 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH INTERNSHIP 
3-12 sem. hrs. 

Internship in a governmental, industrial, or institutional orga- 
nization, providing on-the-job training and introduction to a 
career in environmental health. May be repeated; maximum 
12 hours. Prerequisite: Consent program director. 



398.02 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 
INTERNSHIP IN HEALTH EDUCATION 

1-16 sem. hrs. 

Extended in-service experience under the guidance of quali- 
fied personnel in Health Education. Prerequisites: 2.50 
major and cumulative GPA; HSC 395 and 396. 

398.03 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: HEALTH 
INFORMATION MANAGEMENT: 
MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP 

3 sem. hrs. 

Application of advanced Health Information Management 
skills in a health related setting geared towards the career 
interests of the students. Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C 
in all major courses. Major only and consent program direc- 
tor. Evidence of health insurance and professional liability 
insurance required. 

398.04 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 
SAFETY 

6-12 sem. hrs. 

Structured safety work experience under the supervision of an 
experienced safety professional in a business, industry, or gov- 
ernment setting, with oversight by a Safety faculty member. 
Provides a capstone experience for Safety majors. Formerly 
PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: IN SAFETY. Prerequisites: 
HSC 248, 271, 359, 381 and 6 hours from HSC 272, 362, 370, 
372, 378, 380, 382, 383, 384, 385. Senior standing; 2.00 major 
and cumulative GPA required. Safety majors only. 

398.21 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 
MEDICAL LABORATORY SCDZNCE: 
SPECIAL STUDIES 

1-8 sem. hrs. 

Structured, off-campus clinical laboratory experience under 
the guidance of qualified medical laboratory professionals. 
Students receive individualized training and practicum to 
develop professional attitudes, competencies and analytical 
skills. Primarily for students completing the B.S. require- 
ments through clinical study standard track. Prerequisites: 
HSC 260, 261, 262, 263, 301, 302, 308. 

398.22 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: MEDICAL 
LABORATORY SCIENCE: BIOCHEMISTRY 
2 sem. hrs. 

Structured, off-campus clinical laboratory experience under 
the guidance of qualified medical laboratory professionals. 
Students receive individualized training and practicum to 
develop professional attitudes, competencies and analytical 
skills. Primarily for students completing the B.S. require- 
ments through clinical study standard track. Prerequisites: 
C or better in HSC 260, 261, 262, 263, 301, 302, 308 taken 
within the last 7 years. 

398.23 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: MEDICAL 
LABORATORY SCIENCE: SEROLOGY 

1 sem. hr. 

Structured, off-campus clinical laboratory experience under 
the guidance of qualified medical laboratory professionals. 
Students receive individualized training and practicum to 
develop professional attitudes, competencies and analytical 
skills. Primarily for students completing the B.S. require- 
ments through clinical study standard track. Prerequisites: 
C or better in HSC 260, 261, 262, 263, 301, 302, 308 taken 
within the last 7 years. 



398.24 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: MEDICAL 
LABORATORY SCIENCE: URINALYSIS 
AND BODY FLUIDS 

1 sem. hr. 

Structured, off-campus clinical laboratory experience under 
the guidance of qualified medical laboratory professionals. 
Students receive individualized training and practicum to 
develop professional attitudes, competencies and analytical 
skills. Primarily for students completing the B.S. require- 
ments through clinical study standard track. Prerequisites: 
C or better in HSC 260, 261, 262, 263, 301, 302, 308 taken 
within the last 7 years. 

398.27 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: MEDICAL 
LABORATORY SCIENCE: HEMATOLOGY 

2 sem. hrs. 

Structured, off-campus clinical laboratory experience under 
the guidance of qualified medical laboratory professionals. 
Students receive individualized training and practicum to 
develop professional attitudes, competencies and analytical 
skills. Primarily for students completing the B.S. require- 
ments through clinical study standard track. Prerequisites: 
C or better in HSC 260, 261, 262, 263, 301, 302, 308 taken 
within the last 7 years. 

398.28 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: MEDICAL 
LABORATORY SCIENCE: MICROBIOLOGY 

4 sem. hrs. 

Structured, off-campus clinical laboratory experience under 
the guidance of qualified medical laboratory professionals. 
Students receive individualized training and practicum to 
develop professional attitudes, competencies and analytical 
skills. Primarily for students completing the B.S. require- 
ments through clinical study standard track. Prerequisites: C 
or better in HSC 260, 261, 262, 263, 301, 302, 308 taken 
within the last 7 years. 

398.29 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: MEDICAL 
LABORATORY SCIENCE: 
IMMUNOHEMATOLOGY 

2 sem. hrs. 

Structured, off-campus clinical laboratory experience under 
the guidance of qualified medical laboratory professionals. 
Students receive individualized training and practicum to 
develop professional attitudes, competencies and analytical 
skills. Primarily for students completing the B.S. require- 
ments through clinical study standard track. Prerequisites: C 
or better in HSC 260, 261, 262, 263, 301, 302, 308 taken 
within the last 7 years. 



INFORMATION 
TECHNOLOGY (ITK) 515 

202 Old Union, (309) 438-8338 
Web address: www.ITK.ilstu.edu 

Interim Director: Joaquin Vila-Ruiz. 

Tenured/Tenure-track Faculty: 

Professors: Gyires, Lim, Vila-Ruiz. 

Associate Professors: Califf, Li, Mahatanankoon, Qaddour, 

Rariden. 

Assistant Professors: Chou, Hosack, Jong, Sagers, Shesh, 

Suh, Tang, Twitchell, Wolf. 



Health Sciences; Information Technology 

General School Information 



115 



The School of Information Technology (ITK) offers 
three degree programs: Information Systems, Computer 
Science, and Telecommunications Management. All three 
require substantial interpersonal communication skills as 
well as technical skills in computing, information tech- 
nology and networking. The curricula have a strong prac- 
tical emphasis on the application of computers, systems, 
and networking techniques to real world problems. Practi- 
cal skills and applications are balanced with exposure to 
the knowledge base that underlies the field of computing. 
A core of 3 courses (10 hours) provides a common foun- 
dation for each degree program. 

Both the Information Systems and Computer Science 
programs prepare a student for an application develop- 
ment oriented computing career, but, there are important 
differences in the context of the work to be performed, 
the types of problems to be solved, and the types of sys- 
tems to be designed and built. Starting positions for either 
program include such job titles as programmer or pro- 
grammer/analyst. The Telecommunications Management 
program prepares undergraduate students to enter the 
telecommunications industry in entry-level positions with 
adequate preparation to assume management positions 
once work experience is gained. 

Department minors are intended to help majors in 
other departments focus on specific skills and electives 
which are relevant for their career needs. Minors are avail- 
able in Information Systems and in Computer Science. 

Academic Requirements: 

For any student who enrolls in a course in the School 
of Information Technology, a grade of C or better is 
required in all prerequisite courses. For majors, only cours- 
es in which the student has received a grade of C or better 
may be counted toward the hours required in the major, 
including supporting requirements. 

A student cannot pursue a double major in any two 
programs in the School of Information Technology. Also, 
a student cannot pursue both a major and a minor in 
Information Technology. 

Admission Requirements: 

A student may enter a major or minor in the School of 
Information Technology as a new freshman, a transfer stu- 
dent, or as a change of major at Illinois State University. Stu- 
dents should contact the Information Technology 
undergraduate advisor or University Admissions for mini- 
mum admission requirements. 

Transfer Students: 

Proficiency with the Java programming language is 
expected in 200-and 300-level Information Technology 
courses and is usually obtained by completing ITK 168 or 
177 and one of 178, 179, 277; or ITK 275. 



116 Information Technology 

HONORS IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 

The School offers honors work in all programs to 
highly qualified juniors and seniors. Candidates must 
have a 3.30 overall GPA and a 3.50 GPA in Information 
Technology. Honors requirements involve honors course 
work and the preparation of a substantial research paper 
or the completion of a significant application project pre- 
pared under the guidance of a faculty advisor. For further 
information contact the Director of Honors. 

PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE 

Each degree program requires a practical experience that 
may be satisfied by a directed project or an internship. An 
internship experience is the usual way for students to satisfy 
this requirement. ITK 191(1 hour) is required and prepares 
students for fulfilling this requirement. It is recommended 
that ITK 191 be taken no later than the sophomore year. 

The six (6) hours of Professional Practice credit 
counted toward the major will be graded. Any additional 
Professional Practice credit will be earned on a CR/NC 
basis. A maximum of 16 hours of Professional Practice 
credit (ITK 391, 398) may be applied toward graduation. 
Students may not register for ITK 398 during the last 
semester of their studies. 

MINOR IN COGNITIVE SCIENCE 

The School of Information Technology participates in 
the Minor in Cognitive Science program. Several courses 
offered by the School contribute to the minor. For further 
information, please consult the School undergraduate advi- 
sor as well as the section entitled "Minor in Cognitive Sci- 
ence" under University-Wide Curriculum in this 
Undergraduate Catalog. 

Information Systems Programs 

Degree Offered: B.S. 

MAJOR IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS 

The Information Systems (IS) Major is designed to 
prepare professionals in Information Systems including such 
areas as systems analysis and design and software engineer- 
ing. This degree focuses on the use of computer technology 
and information management methods to solve business 
problems. This requires an understanding of both the orga- 
nizational context of the problem and the technologies, 
methodologies, and tools typically utilized. There are four 
sequences within this program: the Information Assurance 
and Security Sequence, the Integration of Enterprise Sys- 
tems Sequence, the Systems Development/Analyst 
Sequence, and the Web Application Development 
Sequence. 

The Analyst sequence provides breadth and depth in 
analysis and design techniques preparing students to work in 
a variety of information technology environments, while the 
Web sequence emphasizes the development of Web/Inter- 
net-based business information systems. The Integration of 



Enterprise Systems Sequence is designed for students who 
wish to pursue both technical and practical skills in large- 
scale, multi-platform enterprise computing systems. The 
Information Assurance and Security Sequence is designed to 
give students the knowledge and tools necessary for protect- 
ing information and information systems. The Information 
Systems program is accredited by the Computing Accredita- 
tion Commission (CAC) of the Accreditation Board for 
Engineering and Technology (ABET). 

Preparation for Graduate Study: 

The Information Systems major offers excellent prepa- 
ration for a number of computer and management informa- 
tion systems master's programs. Students interested in an 
MBA program may want to combine this major with a Busi- 
ness Administration minor. Any student interested in gradu- 
ate school should discuss options with faculty and an 
academic advisor during their junior year. 

Information Assurance and Security Sequence: 

The Information Assurance and Security Sequence is 
designed to give students the knowledge and tools necessary 
for protecting information and information systems. The 
sequence provides education for protecting the confidentiali- 
ty, availability, and integrity of information using technolo- 
gy, people, and policy. A minor is not required. 

Information Technology courses (45 hours): 
Information Technology core (10 hours): 

—ITK 160, 177,261. 
Practical Experience (7 hours): 

— ITK 191. 

— 1 of 3 options: 

— 6 hours of ITK 398, or 

— 3 hours of ITK 391 and 3 hours of ITK 398, or 

— 3 hours of ITK 391 and 1 course from ITK 
353, 368, 373, 380 (if not used to satisfy 
other requirements). 

Other ITK course requirements (28 hours): 

— ITK 178, 254, 350, 351, 363, 375, 377, 378. 

—1 course from: ITK 353, 368, 373, 380 (if not 
already used). 
Supporting requirements (33 hours): 

Mathematics and Statistics (11 hours): 
—MAT 120 or 145, 160. 
—1 statistics course, e.g., ECO/GEO/POL/PSY 138; 
MQM 100. 
Communication and Organization (22 hours): 

— ACC 131; COM 223; ECO 105; MQM 220. 
—1 course from: COM 202, 227; ENG 249. 
—2 courses from: ACC 132; ECO 225 or 239 or 
245; FIL 185, FIL 240; MKT 230. 

Integration of Enterprise Systems Sequence: 

The Integration of Enterprise Systems Sequence is 
designed for students who are interested in the areas of 
software development, project management, and applica- 
tion integration using large enterprise computing systems. 



This sequence provides in-depth knowledge regarding the 
integration of business applications on a large enterprise 
computing system. A minor is not required. 

Information Technology courses (45-46 hours): 
Information Technology core (10 hours): 

— ITK 160, 177,261. 
Professional Practice (7 hours): 

—ITK 191. 

— 1 of 2 options: 

— 6 hours of ITK 398, or 

— 3 hours of ITK 391 and 3 hours of ITK 398. 
Other ITK course requirements (28-29 hours): 

—ITK 178, 225, 330, 331, 332, 378, 392. 

—1 of: ITK 272, 363. 

—1 of: ITK 363, 365, 367, 368, 372, 384 (if not 

used to satisfy other requirements). 
Supporting requirements (33 hours): 

Mathematics and Statistics (11 hours): 

—MAT 120 or 145, 160. 

—1 of: ECO/GEO/POL/PSY 138; MQM 100. 
Communication and Organization (22 hours): 

— ACC 131; COM 223; ECO 105; MQM 220. 

—1 courses from: COM 202, 227; ENG 249. 

—2 courses from: ACC 132; ECO 225 or 239 or 
245; FIL 240; MKT 230. 

Systems Development/Analyst Sequence: 

The Systems Development/Analyst Sequence is 
designed for the student who will seek a position as an 
Information Systems professional developing business- 
oriented information systems. This sequence provides 
in-depth knowledge of analysis and design techniques 
along with electives in emerging technologies. A minor 
is not required. 

Information Technology courses (46 hours): 
Information Technology core (10 hours): 

—ITK 160, 177,261. 
Professional Practice (7 hours): 

—ITK 191. 

— 1 of 3 options: 

— 6 hours of ITK 398, or 

— 3 hours of ITK 391 and 3 hours of ITK 398, or 

— 3 hours of ITK 391 and 1 course from ITK 
341, 346, 353, 365, 367, 368 (if not 

used to satisfy other requirements). 
Other ITK course requirements (29 hours): 

—ITK 178, 254, 272, 363, 372, 375, 378. 
— 2 additional courses from: ITK 341, 346, 350, 
353, 365, 367, 368 (if not already used). 
Supporting requirements (33 hours): 

Mathematics and Statistics (1 1 hours): 
—MAT 120 or 145, 160. 
—1 statistics course, e.g. ECO/GEO/POL/PSY 138; 
MQM 100. 
Communication and Organization (22 hours): 

—ACC 131; COM 223; ECO 105; MQM 220. 
—1 course from: COM 202, 227; ENG 249. 
—2 courses from: ACC 132; ECO 225 or 239 or 
245; FIL 185, FIL 240; MKT 230. 



Information Technology 
Web Application Development Sequence: 



17 



The Web Application Development Sequence is 
designed to give students a background for developing 
information systems in a Web/Internet-based environ- 
ment. This sequence provides in-depth knowledge of 
Web development techniques and supporting technolo- 
gies, along with related emerging technologies. A minor 
is not required. 

Information Technology courses (45 hours): 
Information Technology core (10 hours): 

—ITK 160, 177,261. 
Professional Practice (7 hours): 

—ITK 191. 

— 1 of: 3 options: 

— 6 hours of ITK 398, or 

— 3 hours of ITK 391 and 3 hours of ITK 398, or 

— 3 hours of ITK 391 and 1 course from ITK 
341, 367, 368.03 (if not used to satisfy other 
requirements). 

Other ITK course requirements (28 hours): 

—ITK 178, 254, 272, 353, 354, 375, 377, 378. 
—1 additional course from: ITK 341, 367, 368 (if 
not already used). 
Supporting requirements (33 hours): 

Mathematics and Statistics (1 1 hours): 
—MAT 120 or 145, 160. 

—1 statistics course, e.g. ECO/GEO/POL/PSY 138; 
MQM 100. 
Communication and Organization (22 hours): 

—ACC 131; COM 223; ECO 105; MQM 220. 
—1 course from: COM 202, 227; ENG 249. 
—2 courses from: ACC 132; ECO 225 or 239 or 
245; FIL 185, FIL 240; MKT 230. 



MINOR IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS 

The Information Systems Minor is designed for peo- 
ple who will use computers as tools in their chosen pro- 
fession or provide limited computer support for their 
work group, but not be computing professionals. The 
Application Development Concentration is a general 
information systems minor requiring the ITK core plus 
two elective courses. 

Minor (22 hours): 

Required core (10 hours): 

—ITK 160, 177,261. 
Concentration (12 hours): 

Application Development: 
—ITK 178, 254. 
—1 course from: ITK 341, 353, 365, 367, 

368, 375, 378. 
—1 additional ITK 200 or 300-level course (at 
least 3 hours). 



118 Information Technology 

Computer Science Programs 

Degree Offered: B.S. 

MAJOR IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 

This degree is designed for students who wish to pur- 
sue a comprehensive study of computer science that blends 
theory, abstraction, and design in a variety of traditional 
and current areas. Graduates will be prepared to work for a 
variety of companies including those that have a scientific, 
engineering, or mathematical focus. It would also prepare 
students to pursue graduate studies in Computer Science. 
There are two sequences, the General Computer Science 
Sequence, and the Enterprise Computing Engineering 
Sequence, within this program. The General Computer Sci- 
ence sequence is designed for students who wish to pursue 
a broad education in computer science. The Enterprise 
Computing Engineering sequence is designed for students 
who wish to pursue both technical and practical skill in 
large-scale, multi-platform enterprise computing systems. 
The General sequence of the Computer Science program is 
accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission 
(CAC) of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and 
Technology (ABET). 

General Computer Science Sequence: 

The General Computer Science Sequence is designed to 
prepare students to work for a variety of companies includ- 
ing those that have a scientific, engineering, or mathematical 
focus. It would also prepare students to pursue graduate 
studies in Computer Science. A minor is not required. 

Computer Science courses (47 hours): 
Computer Science core (10 hours): 

— ITK160, 168,261. 
Professional Practice (7 hours): 

— ITK191. 

— 1 of 3 options: 

— 6 hours of ITK 398, or 

— 3 hours of ITK 391 and 3 hours of ITK 398, or 

— 3 hours of ITK 391 and 1 course from ITK 
326, 340, 341, 353, 354, 356, 367, 375, 378, 
382, 384, 385, 388 (if not used to satisfy 
other requirements). 

Other ITK course requirements (30 hours): 
—ITK 179, 225, 279, 327, 328, 383. 
—2 of: ITK 326, 340, 356, 378, 384, 388. 
—2 additional courses from: ITK 326, 340, 341, 
353, 354, 356, 367, 375, 378, 382, 384, 385, 388 
(if not already used). 
Supporting requirements (36-38 hours): 

Mathematics and Statistics (15-16 hours): 
—MAT 145, 146,260. 
—1 course from: MQM 100; MAT 250, 350. 
Communication (6 hours): 

— COM 223; ENG 249. 
Science (15-16 hours): 

— 1 pair of: CHE 140, 141; or PHY 110, 111. 
—2 additional courses from: BSC 196, 197; 

CHE 140, 141; PHY 110, 111, 112,375. 



Enterprise Computing Engineering Sequence: 

The Enterprise Computing Engineering Sequence is 
designed for students who are interested in the areas of com- 
puter architecture, networking, and performance analysis 
and improvement of mainframe computing systems. This 
sequence prepares students for system programmer/analyst 
positions in a large scale enterprise computing environment. 
A minor is not required. 

Computer Science courses (47-49 hours): 
Computer Science core (10 hours): 

—ITK 160, 168,261. 
Professional Practice (7 hours): 

—ITK 191. 

— 1 of 2 options: 

— 6 hours of ITK 398, or 

— 3 hours of ITK 391 and 3 hours of ITK 398. 
Other ITK course requirements (30-32 hours): 

—ITK 179, 225, 279, 330, 331, 332, 394. 

—2 courses from: ITK 272, 372, 378, 382, 383. 

—1 course from: ITK 326, 327, 340, 363, 382, 

383, 384, 385, 388 (if not used to satisfy other 
requirements). 

Supporting requirements (36-38 hours): 

Mathematics and Statistics (15-16 hours): 

—MAT 145, 146, 260. 

—1 course from: MQM 100; MAT 250, 350. 
Communication (6 hours): 

— COM 223; ENG 249. 
Science (15-16 hours): 

—1 pair of: CHE 140, 141; or PHY 110, 111. 

—2 additional courses from: BSC 196, 197; 
CHE 140, 141; PHY 1 10, 1 1 1, 1 12, 375. 

Preparation for Graduate Study: 

The Computer Science major should be elected by those 
students interested in traditional Computer Science graduate 
programs. Any student interested in graduate school should 
discuss options with faculty and an academic advisor during 
the junior year. 

MINOR IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 

This minor provides a solid foundation for using the 
computer as a tool in any discipline and may be of particular 
interest to majors in mathematics or the natural sciences. It 
provides an opportunity for students to gain knowledge in a 
specialized area such as graphics, parallel processing, or arti- 
ficial intelligence. 

Minor (22 hours): 

Required core (10 hours): 

—ITK 160, 168,261. 
Concentration (12 hours): 

—ITK 179,225,279. 

—1 course from: ITK 327, 328, 340, 341, 356, 

384, 388. 



Information Technology 



119 



Telecommunications 
Management Programs 

Degree Offered: B.S. 

MAJOR EN TELECOMMUNICATIONS MANAGEMENT 

Telecommunications Management is concerned with 
information systems, telecommunications technology, com- 
puter technology, business practices, policy issues, and psy- 
chological/social considerations involved in voice, data, 
image, and facsimile transmission. This multidisciplinary 
program prepares undergraduate students to enter the 
telecommunications industry in entry-level positions with 
adequate preparation to assume management positions 
once work experience is gained. Graduates will possess 
an in-depth technical understanding of computer networks 
and telecommunication systems as well as an appreciation 
of the economic and public policy issues that are impor- 
tant in the design and development of local and wide area 
networks, and national and multinational telecommunica- 
tion systems. A minor is not required. 

Major courses (57 hours): 

Information Technology core (10 hours): 

— ITK 160, 177,261. 
Professional Practice (7 hours): 

—ITK 191. 

— 1 of 3 options: 

— 6 hours of ITK 398, or 

— 3 hours of ITK 391 and 3 hours of ITK 398, or 

— 3 hours of ITK 391 and 1 course from ITK 
350, 353, 371, 374, 378, 380, 382 (if not 
used to satisfy other requirements). 

Telecommunications Technology (27 hours): 
—ITK 254, 277, 373, 375, 377, 379. 
—TEC 383. 

— 2 additional courses from: ITK 350, 353, 371, 
374, 378, 380, 382 (if not used to satisfy other 
requirements). 
Economic, Legal, Public Policy (13 hours): 
—ECO 105, 235. 

—1 course from: FIL 311, 312; POL 318. 
—1 course from: MQM 221; PSY 230. 
Supporting requirements (29 hours): 

Mathematics and Statistics (1 1 hours): 

— 1 course from: MAT 120 or 145. 
— 1 course from: MAT 146 or 160. 
—1 course from: ECO/GEO/POL/PSY 138; 
MQM 100. 
Communication and Organization (15 hours): 

—1 course from: COM 202, 227; ENG 249. 
— ACC 131; COM 223; FIL 185; MQM 220. 
Ethics (3 hours): 
—PHI 234. 

Information Technology Courses 

Most Information Technology courses are restricted to 
students with majors or minors within the School of Infor- 
mation Technology. Some Information Technology courses 



may not be offered every year. Contact the School of Infor- 
mation Technology undergraduate advisor for the current 
schedule of offerings. 

115 REASONING ABOUT 

COMPLEX SYSTEMS MC-QR 

3 sem. hrs. 

Systems theory applied to complex systems. Design, construc- 
tion, uses, and analysis of simulations for complex systems. 
May not be taken under the CT/NC option. Prerequisites: 
MAT 113, 120, or 145. 

140 INTERACTING IN A 

DIGITAL WORLD OC-SMT 

3 sem. hrs. 

This course provides foundation concepts of computers and 
information technologies and their application in today's 
world. Not for credit ITK major/minor. Formerly INTRO- 
DUCTION TO THE COMPUTER WORLD. Prerequisites: 
Inner Core: ENG 101; COM 1 10. 

150 USING MICROCOMPUTER 
PRODUCTIVITY TOOLS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to typical microcomputer-based productivity 
tools such as word processing, spreadsheets, databases, and 
presentation graphics. Lecture and lab. Not for credit ITK 
major/minor, or if had BTE 125. 

155.02 INTRODUCTION TO MICROCOMPUTERS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to microcomputers and programming, with 
scientific and technical applications emphasized. BASIC 
and machine language programming including I/O, ele- 
mentary files, application software, and hardware and soft- 
ware evaluation. Lecture and lab. Materials charge 
optional. Not for credit ITK major/minor, or if had ITK 
155.01 or 254. 

160 FOUNDATIONS OF INFORMATION 
TECHNOLOGY 

3 sem. hrs. 

Concepts of computer-based systems; computer hardware, 
software, and organizational environments; system cate- 
gories, delivery modes; systems development methods; 
career opportunities, responsibilities. Required as the first 
course in the ITK major. 

165 COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 
FOR SCIENTISTS 

4 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to computer programming emphasizing 
numerical algorithms for scientific applications. Problem 
analysis and operating system concepts included. Not for 
credit ITK major/minor. Lecture and lab. Prerequisite: C 
or better in MAT 145. 

168 STRUCTURED PROBLEM-SOLVING 
USING THE COMPUTER 
4 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to the development of algorithms for comput- 
er systems processing. Emphasis on structured problem 
solving and the design of problem solutions. Recommend- 
ed as one of the first courses in the CS major. Lecture and 
lab. Prerequisite: MAT 104 or high school equivalent. 



120 Information Technology 

177 PROBLEM SOLVING FOR 
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 
4 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to algorithm development for computer systems 
processing emphasizing end-user needs, problem solving, 
and object-oriented programming techniques. Recommended 
as one of the first courses in IS/TCM major. Lecture and lab. 
Formerly ITK 189.02. Not for credit if had ITK 168. Prereq- 
uisite: MAT 104 or high school equivalent. 

178 COMPUTER APPLICATION 
PROGRAMMING 

3 sem. hrs. 

The design, development, and implementation of computer 
application systems, including files and GUI. Not for credit 
if had ITK 169 or 275. Prerequisites: C or better in ITK 177 
or consent department advisor. 

179 INTRODUCTION TO DATA STRUCTURES 

3 sem. hrs. 

Intermediate computer programming, including elemen- 
tary data structures such as linked lists, stacks, queues, 
binary trees. Not for credit if had ITK 169 or 275. Prerequi- 
sites: C or better in ITK 168 or consent department advisor. 

191 INTRODUCTION TO ITK 
PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE 
1 sem. hr. 

Researching available positions, interpreting job descrip- 
tions, interview skills, preparing a resume, benefits of a 
Professional Practice experience. Prerequisites: C or better 
in ITK 160 and ITK (168 or 177). Major only. 

214 SOCIAL, LEGAL, AND ETHICAL ISSUES 

IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY OC-SMT 

3 sem. hrs. 

Study of personal, societal, legal, and ethical issues raised 
by the effects of information technology. Prerequisite: 
Inner Core. 

225 COMPUTER ORGANIZATION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to computer organization, internal representa- 
tion of instructions and data, and interaction between soft- 
ware and hardware components. Formerly ITK 325. 
Prerequisites: C or better in ITK 178 or 179. Major/minor 
only or consent department advisor. 

254 HARDWARE AND 

SOFTWARE CONCEPTS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Overview of nature and interrelationships of computer 
architectures, hardware, operating systems, data types, 
programming languages, application development facili- 
ties, networks, communications. Prerequisites: C or bet- 
ter in ITK 160 and 177. Major/minor only or consent 
department advisor. 

261 SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT I 
3 sem. hrs. 

Information systems development, development methodolo- 
gies, analysis and design techniques and tools, relational 
database concepts. Prerequisites: C or better in ITK (178, 
1 79, or 277) and ITK (254 or 225 or concurrent registration). 
Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 



272 COBOL AS A SECOND LANGUAGE 
4 sem. hrs. 

COBOL language for students with substantial program- 
ming experience in another language. Emphasizes struc- 
tured problem-solving and programming. Not for credit if 
had ACC 366. Prerequisites: C or better in ITK 178. 
Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 

275 JAVA AS A SECOND LANGUAGE 
4 sem. hrs. 

Intensive study of the Java programming language for stu- 
dents with previous programming experience. Not for credit 
if had ITK 169, 178, 179, or 277. Prerequisites: 2-semester 
sequence in a high-level programming language required. 
Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 

277 PROGRAMMING FOR 

TELECOMMUNICATIONS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Network programming based on TCP/IP and other commu- 
nications protocols. Emphasis is on multi-tier and collabora- 
tive applications. Formerly ITK 355 MICROCOMPUTER 
APPLICATION AND DESIGN Not for credit if had ITK 
169 or 275. Prerequisites: C or better in ITK 177 or consent 
department advisor. 

279 ALGORITHMS AND DATA STRUCTURES 
3 sem. hrs. 

Data structures, algorithms, mathematical foundations of 
computer science. Topics include lists, trees, graphs, sort- 
ing, searching, correctness, computational complexity, 
parallel algorithms. Prerequisites: C or better in ITK 179; 
MAT 160 or 260 or concurrent registration in MAT 260. 
Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 

326 PRINCIPLES OF SOFTWARE ENGINEERING 
3 sem. hrs. 

Fundamentals of software engineering. Topics include speci- 
fication models, metrics, design fundamentals, interface 
design, quality assurance, and automated tools. Offered alter- 
nate years. Prerequisites: C or better in ITK 179 and 261. 
Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 

327 CONCEPTS OF PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES 
3 sem. hrs. 

Survey of pragmatic, syntactic and semantic structure of 
programming languages. Procedural, logic-oriented, object- 
oriented and other contemporary languages included. Pre- 
requisites: C or better in ITK 179. Major/minor only or 
consent department advisor. 

328 INTRODUCTION TO THE THEORY 
OF COMPUTATION 

3 sem. hrs. 

Basic concepts in computing theory. Topics include recur- 
sive definitions, regular expressions, transition graphs, 
automata, nondeterminism, grammars, parsing, decidability, 
Turing machines. Prerequisites: C or better in ITK 279. 
Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 

330 INTRODUCTION TO ENTERPRISE 
COMPUTING SYSTEMS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to the mainframe enterprise computing sys- 
tems, organizations, architectures, operating systems, net- 
working, hardware and software utilities, and applications. 
Prerequisites: C or better in ITK 225. Major/minor only or 
consent department advisor. 



Information Technology 



121 



331 OPERATING, DATA COMMUNICATIONS, 
NETWORKING, AND SECURITY OF 
ENTERPRISE SYSTEMS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Mainframe Operating Systems, process communications, 
networking, protocols, enterprise system clustering, 
front/back-end hardware/software component connec- 
tions, administrations, and security. Prerequisites: C or 
better in ITK 225. Major/minor only or consent depart- 
ment advisor. 

332 ADVANCED ENTERPRISE 
COMPUTING SYSTEMS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Enterprise system programming, application development 
and integration, performance analysis and improvement, 
workload/resource management, database and information 
management, and system security enhancement. Prerequi- 
sites: C or better in ITK 261, 330 and 331. Major/minor 
only or consent department advisor. 

334 SYSTEM PROGRAMMING AND 
SYSTEM ADMINISTRATION IN 
ENTERPRISE COMPUTING SYSTEMS 

3 sem. hrs. 

In-depth study of the system programming methodologies and 
system administration mechanisms of large-scale mainframe 
based enterprise computing systems. Prerequisites: C or better 
in ITK 330. Major or minor only or consent department advisor. 

340 INTRODUCTION TO 
ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE 

3 sem. hrs. 

Foundations of artificial intelligence including heuristic 
search and knowledge representation with a survey of sev- 
eral artificial intelligence research areas. Prerequisites: C 
or better in ITK 279. Major/minor only or consent depart- 
ment advisor. 

341 OBJECT-ORIENTED 
SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT 

3 sem. hrs. 

Main concepts of object-oriented technology and a comprehen- 
sive methodology for system development. Object-oriented 
analysis, design, and implementation including object-oriented 
databases. Prerequisites: C or better in 261. Major/minor only 
or consent department advisor. 

346 KNOWLEDGE ENGINEERING 
3 sem. hrs. 

In-depth study of knowledge-based systems and the 
knowledge engineering process; use of expert systems 
tools to construct applications. Offered alternate years. 
Prerequisites: C or better in ITK 261. Major/minor only 
or consent department advisor. 

350 FUNDAMENTALS OF INFORMATION 
ASSURANCE AND SECURITY 

3 sem. hrs. 

Fundamental concepts in information assurance and 
security including planning, risk management, cryptog- 
raphy, network security, hardening, people, and physical 
security. Prerequisite: C or better in ITK 261 . 



351 ADVANCED INFORMATION ASSURANCE 
AND APPLIED CRYPTOGRAPHY 

3 sem. hrs. 

Information assurance and security using technology 
including applied cryptography, authentication protocols, 
intrusion detection, and anti-malware. Formerly DATA 
COMMUNICATIONS SECURITY. Prerequisites: C or bet- 
ter in ITK 350 and 375 or consent of department advisor. 

353 WEB DEVELOPMENT TECHNOLOGIES 
3 sem. hrs. 

Web concepts, infrastructure, development technologies, 
multi-tiered program design and implementation, and current 
issues and trends. Prerequisites: C or better in 261. 
Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 

354 ADVANCED WEB APPLICATION 
DEVELOPMENT 

3 sem. hrs. 

Theory and practice of state-of-the-art technologies for 
application development for the Web including service-ori- 
ented and mobile systems. Prerequisite: C or better in ITK 
353. Major/minor only or consent of department advisor. 

356 INTRODUCTION TO 

COMPUTER GRAPHICS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Graphics software and hardware, pipeline model of render- 
ing. 2D/3D modeling, transformations. Algorithms: poly- 
gons, lighting, textures, visibility. Prerequisites: ITK 279. 
Major/minor only or consent of department advisor. 

363 SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT II 

4 sem. hrs. 

Emphasis on analysis and design techniques and tools, pro- 
ject communication, systems development methodologies, 
interface design. Systems development team project. Pre- 
requisites: C or better in ITK 261. C or better in COM 223. 
Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 

365 SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT 
TOOLS AND ISSUES 
3 sem. hrs. 

Modern systems development tools, implementation issues 
related to modern tools, techniques, and methodologies; 
emerging type of systems being developed. Prerequisites: 
C or better in ITK 261. Major/minor only or consent 
department advisor. 

367 DESIGNING THE USER INTERFACE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Human factors issues in developing information systems: 
task analysis, user interface design guidelines, psychological 
principles, prototyping interfaces, and user evaluation. Pre- 
requisites: C or better in ITK 261. Major/minor only or con- 
sent department advisor. 

368 TOPICS IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Advanced topics in information systems, including sys- 
tems analysis, design, systems development and Web 
development. May be repeated if content different. Pre- 
requisites: Junior/senior standing. Major/minor only or 
consent department advisor. Prerequisites vary with topic 
chosen. 



122 



Information Technology 



371 SIMULATION AND ANALYSIS OF INTERNET 
APPLICATION PERFORMANCE 

3 sem. hrs. 

Performance prediction and simulation-modeling methods 
and techniques in the design and proactive management of 
Internet applications. Prerequisite: C or better in ITK 375. 
Major/minor only or consent of department advisor. 

372 EXTERNAL DATA STRUCTURES 
3 sem. hrs. 

External file design, VSAM, IBM utilities and 
sort/merge, basic concepts of IBM/MVS operating sys- 
tems, and extensive study of JCL. Prerequisites: C or 
better in ITK 254 and 272. Major/minor only or consent 
department advisor. 

373 WIDE AREA NETWORK 
INFRASTRUCTURES 

3 sem. hrs. 

Design, configure, operate, and use Wide Area Networks 
and network applications. Emphasizes hands-on use of net- 
work design tools. Prerequisites: C or better in ITK 375. 
Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 

374 TOPICS IN TELECOMMUNICATIONS 
3 sem. hrs. 

In-depth study of a topic in telecommunications such as 
emerging technologies, network administration, network 
management architectures, and wireless communica- 
tions. May be repeated if content different. Prerequi- 
sites: Junior/senior standing. Major/minor only or 
consent department advisor. Prerequisites vary with 
topic chosen. 






375 DATA COMMUNICATIONS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Hardware and software used in data communications and 
networking. Network types, architectures, protocols and 
standards. Local area and packet networks. Prerequisites: C 
or better in ITK (178, 179 or 277) and (254 or 225). 
Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 

377 PRACTICAL TELECOMMUNICATIONS 
NETWORKING 

3 sem. hrs. 

Design, configure, operate and use local area networks, net- 
work applications, and wide area network concepts. Empha- 
sizes hands-on use of a network operating system. 
Prerequisites: C or better in ITK 375. Major/minor only or 
consent department advisor. 

378 DATABASE PROCESSING 
3 sem. hrs. 

Database concepts, emphasis on relational databases, SQL, 
data modeling, database design, DBMS functions, database 
application programming, current trends, design project. 
Prerequisites: C or better in ITK 261. Major/minor only or 
consent department advisor. 

379 TELECOMMUNICATIONS NETWORK 
OPERATIONS AND MANAGEMENT 

3 sem. hrs. 

Overview of process of operating and managing large scale 
telecommunications networks; capstone course for Telecom- 
munications Management major. Prerequisites: C or better 
in ITK 377; ECO 235; TEC 383; MQM 220. Major/minor 
only or consent department advisor. 



380 WIRELESS COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS 
3 sem. hrs. 

The theory and practice of wireless telecommunications 
systems. Emphasis is on application, design, and analysis 
of wireless systems. Prerequisites: C or better in ITK 375. 
Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 

382 DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Overview of distributed systems including system architec- 
tures, models, distributed operating systems, distributed 
algorithms, distributed databases, distributed objects, issues 
and trends. Offered alternate years. Prerequisites: C or better 
in ITK (179 or 277) and (225 or 254) and 261. Major/minor 
only or consent department advisor. 

383 PRINCIPLES OF OPERATING SYSTEMS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Functional criteria for operating system design. Job man- 
agement, task management, data management, resource 
allocation and dump and trace facilities. Prerequisites: C 
or better in ITK 179 and 225. Major/minor only or con- 
sent department advisor. 

384 COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Modern computer system design methodologies, techniques 
used in high-performance computing systems, multiprocessor 
architectures and interconnection networks, storage systems, 
and performance evaluations. Prerequisites: C or better in 
ITK 225. Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 

385 TOPICS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 
3 sem. hrs. 

In-depth study of a topic such as compiler design, artificial 
intelligence, programming language and digital logic design. 
May be repeated if content different. Offered alternate years. 
Prerequisites: Junior/senior standing. Major/minor only or con- 
sent department advisor. Prerequisites vary with topic chosen. 

388 INTRODUCTION TO PARALLEL PROCESSING 
3 sem. hrs. 

Study of parallel processors and their software environ- 
ments. Students will write programs for several parallel 
computers. Offered alternate years. Prerequisites: C or bet- 
ter in ITK 225; concurrent registration in ITK 279. 
Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 

391 DIRECTED PROJECT IN 
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 
1-6 sem. hrs. 

Team design and/or implementation of a modest-sized 
computer-based system in a live environment under facul- 
ty supervision. May be repeated; maximum 16 hours 
combined credit in ITK 298, 391 and 398. Prerequisites: 
Senior standing and C or better in ITK 191 and 377 or 
378 or 383. Major only. 

392 ENTERPRISE SYSTEMS INTEGRATION 
AND APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT 

3 sem. hrs. 

Capstone course including business applications, systems 
integration, enterprise business decisions, systems adminis- 
tration, and the systems deployment life cycle. Prerequi- 
sites: C or better in ITK 332 and 378. Major/minor only or 
consent department advisor. 



394 ENTERPRISE SYSTEMS ARCHITECTURE, 
PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS, AND 
SERVER STRUCTURES 
3 sem. hrs. 

Capstone course, including enterprise system architectures, 
hardware/software design, performance analysis/evaluation 
and improvement, and server construction. Prerequisites: 
C or better in ITK 279 and 332. Major/minor only or con- 
sent department advisor. 

398 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: IN 
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 
1-6 sem. hrs. 

Maximum 16 hours credit in Professional Practice. Prereq- 
uisites: C or better in 191. By application and prior approval 
of ITK Professional Practice Advisor only. Major only. 

398.50 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: COOP I 
IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 
1-6 sem. hrs. 

May be repeated; maximum 6 hours. Prerequisite: 
Major only. 

398.60 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: COOP II 
IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 

CR/NC basis only. May be repeated. Prerequisites: Concur- 
rent registration in ITK 398.50. Major only. 



KINESIOLOGY AND 
RECREATION (KNR) 512 

214 Horton, (309) 438-8661 

Web address: KinRec.IllinoisState.edu 

Director: Kevin L. Burke. 
Tenured/Tenure-track Faculty: 

Professors: Brown, Burke, Lacy, McCaw, Thomas. 
Associate Professors: Amorose, Beggs, Coleman, Garrahy, 
Henninger, Hurd, Klitzing, Lagally, Laudner, McEvoy, 
McLoda, Schlatter, Smith. 

Assistant Professors: Carlson, Cox, Elkins, Laurson, Popp, 
Williams, Zahl. 

General School Information 

Admission/Retention Requirements: 

A student may be admitted to the Athletic Training 
Major, Exercise Science Major, Physical Education 
Teacher Education Major or the Recreation and Park 
Administration Major as a new freshman, as a transfer stu- 
dent, or as a change of major at Illinois State University. 
New freshmen who meet the University's admission stan- 
dards may elect to become a major in the School of Kinesiolo- 
gy and Recreation. GPA requirements for transfer student 
admissions are the same as the Change of Major (within Illi- 
nois State). Applications for prospective majors are available in 
the School academic advisement office. 

Retention of students will be determined by the stu- 
dent's cumulative GPA and other specified criteria 
required for the major. All courses required in each major 
must be completed with a grade of C or better. 



Information Technology; Kinesiology and Recreation; 

HONORS IN KINESIOLOGY AND RECREATION 



123 



Majors in the School of Kinesiology and Recreation 
with superior academic records are invited to apply for 
admission to the School Honors Program. The program 
provides an opportunity for a scholastically gifted student 
to pursue personal interests through an independent honors 
project. Students successfully completing the Honors Pro- 
gram will receive the designation of Honors in Kinesiology 
and Recreation upon graduation. The student's official acad- 
emic transcript and diploma will be so noted. 

Admission Requirements: 

— Be a declared Athletic Training, Physical Education 
Teacher Education, Exercise Science, or Recreation and 
Park Administration major with at least 30 and not more 
than 90 hours of course work completed, including at 
least 6 hours of KNR courses. 

— Have a minimum 3.30 overall GPA. 

— Submit an application form to the School of Kinesiology 
and Recreation Honors advisor. 

Honors Program Requirements: 

— Fulfill the general requirements for participation in the 
University Honors Program. 

— Successfully complete a minimum of 3 hours of 
School of Kinesiology and Recreation Honors courses. 

— Successfully complete KNR 295: Honors Seminar. 

— Initiate and complete a research project in KNR 299: 
Independent Honors Study (variable, 3-6 hours) under 
the direction of a faculty mentor in the student's 
major/sequence. 

— Maintain a minimum 3.30 overall GPA. 



PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE/STUDENT TEACHING 

Internship and cooperative education experiences are 
available at all levels in Athletic Training (298, 398), Exer- 
cise Science (298, 398), and in Recreation and Park 
Administration (298, 398). Students may earn from 1-16 
hours. No more than 16 hours may be applied toward grad- 
uation. Professional Practice experiences are supervised 
work experiences in businesses, agencies, organizations, 
and institutions and are either paid or unpaid. For further 
information, contact the Professional Practice coordinator 
in your major. A student with a double major within the 
School of Kinesiology and Recreation will enroll in profes- 
sional practice with the area of certification as the primary 
assignment. An 80-hour assignment in the secondary 
sequence area will be assigned. 

Student Teaching in Physical Education requires being 
accepted into the Teacher Education program at Illinois 
State University. Students are placed in schools with physi- 
cal education cooperating teachers at the elementary, mid- 
dle school, and/or secondary school levels as required for 
teacher certification. Student teachers are supervised by 
Physical Education faculty supervisors. The Physical Edu- 
cation Student Teaching Coordinator arranges for all stu- 
dent teaching placements. 



124 Kinesiology and Recreation 

Athletic Training 
Education Program 

Degree Offered: B.S. 

MAJOR IN ATHLETIC TRAINING 

Program Admission Requirements for New and 
Continuing Students: 

Admission to this academic program is limited and 
is based on space availability and the competitiveness of 
the applicant pool. Factors that may be considered 
include, but are not limited to: courses completed, cumu- 
lative GPA, hours completed, personal interview or writ- 
ten statement, and samples of work completed. For 
additional information on minimum requirements for 
admission and the application and selection process, visit 
www.FindYourMajor.ilstu.edu or contact the undergradu- 
ate advisor for the intended major. 

Admission to Athletic Training Education Program: 

All students planning to become certified athletic train- 
ers must apply for and be admitted to the Athletic Training 
Education Program (ATEP) Clinical Instruction Practicum. 
Completed applications are accepted only during the fall 
semester and must be received on or before November 30. 
Transfer students must also apply to the ATEP Clinical 
Instruction Practicum and will be evaluated individually 
based on previous course work and stated criteria. Current 
application deadlines are posted on the athletic training 
home page and announced in KNR 188. Eligibility to apply 
for admission to the ATEP Clinical Instruction Practicum 
will be determined by the Director of Athletic Training 
Education. Applicants compete for available spaces in the 
program. The following qualifications must be met to be 
considered for admission into the program. 

1 . Fulfill university requirements up to the time of appli- 
cation to the ATEP Clinical Instruction Practicum. 

2. Completion of prerequisite course work with a grade 
of Cor better in KNR 181, 188, 188.01. 

3. Overall GPA of 2.70 or better and major GPA of 2.70 
or better. 

4. Completed application for admittance to the ATEP 
Clinical Instruction Practicum. 

Students successful in the four previous criteria are 
then considered for acceptance into the clinical portion of 
the program. Placement is limited by the number of clinical 
sites and availability of approved clinical instructors. High- 
est priority will be given to the most qualified applicants 
based on the following criteria: 

— overall and major grade point average 

— grades in requisite courses 

— quality of written essay submitted with application 

— performance evaluations of observation hours from 

clinical instructors 

— score on an athletic training general knowledge 

examination 

— two written recommendations from qualified 

individuals 



— completion of an interview with members of the 
athletic training faculty 

The selection process results in one of the following student 
classifications: 

a. full acceptance to the clinical portion of the program 

b. qualified, but placed on a wait list 

c. not qualified, not accepted 

Athletic Training Education Program Curriculum: 

— 6 1 major hours that include: 

— 55 hours in KNR as follows: 

— 17 hours in foundation courses: KNR 181, 182, 240, 
254, 280, 282. 

— 33 hours in athletic training core courses: KNR 188, 
188.01, 252, 284, 288, 298.11, 298.12, 298.13, 298.14, 
298.15, 334, 335, 361, 362, 363, 387, 388. 

— 5 hours (minimum) in KNR 398.12. 

— 6 hours interdisciplinary courses: HSC 105; FCS 315. 

Standards for Progress in the Major: 

Once admitted to the ATEP Clinical Instruction 
Practicum, the student will begin clinical work in athletic 
training at Illinois State University, and must maintain the 
following requirements: 

1 . A minimum cumulative and major GPA of 2.70. 

2. A student falling below the required GPA will be 
placed on probation for one semester. If after one 
semester, the 2.70 GPA has not been re-established, 
the student will be dropped from the ATEP Clinical 
Instruction Practicum and advised to change majors. 

3. The student must earn a C or better on each clinical 
site supervisor evaluation. A student earning less than 
a grade of C will not be permitted to count the hours 
completed during the affected clinical rotation toward 
ATEP requirements. 

4. The student must adhere to the latest published version 
of the Program Policy and Procedures Manual main- 
tained on the Program website. The student is hereby 
informed of reasonable monetary costs associated with 
the Athletic Training Program including the purchase 
of uniform clothing to be worn during assigned clinical 
rotations. 

5. In keeping with the University requirements regard- 
ing hepatitis-B (HBV) immunizations, clinical stu- 
dents in the program shall be immunized against this 
disease. Additionally students admitted to the Clinical 
Instruction Practicum must submit complete docu- 
mentation of a current physical examination from an 
approved (MD or DO) licensed physician. 

6. The student is responsible for maintaining standards 
and expectations of the program. Failure to do so will 
result in written notification and reprimand including 
possible dismissal from the program. 

7. A student who has not been retained in the ATEP 
Clinical Instruction Practicum may reapply for 
admission during the next available application peri- 
od upon the advisement of the Director of Athletic 
Training Education. 



Certification and Licensure: 

Completion of the ATEP program of study including 
1200 supervised clinical hours and certification in first 
aid and Emergency Cardiac Care is designed to permit 
the student to apply to take the BOC certification exami- 
nation and to apply for Illinois licensure as an athletic 
trainer. However, accreditation and licensure require- 
ments are subject to change so the student is strongly 
advised to obtain notification of the latest requirements 
for BOC certification and Illinois licensure from the 
respective governing organizations and from the Director 
of Athletic Training Education. 

Exercise Science Program 

Degree Offered: B.S. 

MAJOR IN EXERCISE SCIENCE 

Program Admission Requirements for New and 
Continuing Students: 

Admission to this academic program is limited and 
is based on space availability and the competitiveness of 
the applicant pool. Factors that may be considered 
include, but are not limited to: courses completed, cumu- 
lative GPA, hours completed, personal interview or writ- 
ten statement, and samples of work completed. For 
additional information on minimum requirements for 
admission and the application and selection process, visit 
www.FindYourMajor.ilstu.edu or contact the undergrad- 
uate advisor for the intended major. 

Exercise Science Program of Study: 

— 67 total hours required. 

— 52 hours in the following core and major courses 
required: 

— 20 hours in core courses: KNR 181, 182, 240, 254, 257, 
280, 282; 

— 22 hours in major courses: KNR 154.40, 164, 285, 286, 
298.10, 307, 308, 309, 310, 378.10; 

— 10 hours in KNR 398.11. 

— 15 hours of courses must be selected from cognate 
groups (Biomechanics, Clinical (diseased) Popula- 
tions, Technology, Business Administration, Nutri- 
tion, Aging, Research, Sport and Exercise 
Psychology, Pre-professional (physical therapy and 
occupational therapy preparation) courses with the 
requirement that at least two courses be taken from 
at least one cognate area. 

— Any course used to satisfy General Education require- 
ments cannot be used as a cognate area elective. 

Standards for Progress in the Major: 

Once admitted to the Exercise Science major, the stu- 
dent must maintain the following requirements: 

1 . A minimum 2.50 cumulative GPA. 

2. A student falling below the required GPA will be placed 
on probation for one semester. If after one semester, the 



Kinesiology and Recreation 125 

2.50 GPA has not been re-established, the student will 
be dropped from the Exercise Science major. 

3. A student who has not been retained in the program, 
may reapply for admission to the Exercise Science 
major after meeting all of the criteria again. The student 
who is not readmitted after one semester of probation 
and has a minimum 2.00 GPA will have the choice to 
enter the Physical Education General Sequence. 

4. A student must have a minimum 2.50 cumulative GPA 
and have completed all major courses with a C or better 
to participate in the senior internship (KNR 398.11 Pro- 
fessional Practice: Internship in Exercise Science). 

Credentialing Opportunities: 

There is no single professional credential or certifi- 
cation that is necessary to pursue a career in Exercise 
Science. However, there are a number of optional cre- 
dentialing opportunities that students are encouraged to 
examine. Coursework in this major is focused on the 
content areas needed for certification preparation by sev- 
eral organizations in this professional field of study. Stu- 
dents graduating in this major can strengthen their 
professional credentials by pursuing a variety of different 
certifications offered by organizations such as the Ameri- 
can College of Sports Medicine and the National 
Strength and Conditioning Association. Students interest- 
ed in learning more about these recommended certifica- 
tion options should consult the Exercise Science Program 
Director in the School of Kinesiolgy and Recreation for 
further information. 

MINOR IN EXERCISE SCIENCE 

— 24 total hours required. 

— 1 1 hours in core courses: KNR 1 8 1 , 1 82, 240, 280. 

— 11 hours in sequence courses: KNR 298.10, 307, 
308, 309. 

— 2 hours minimum selected from the following: KNR 
154.40,282,285,286,310. 

NOTE: The Exercise Science Minor is not available to 
majors in the Kinesiology program of study. 



Physical Education Program 

Degrees Offered: B.S., B.S. in Education 
MAJOR IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The Physical Education program consists of two 
sequences. The Physical Education Teacher Education 
Sequence requires a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.50 
for admission and retention. The Physical Education 
Studies (general) Sequence requires a minimum cumula- 
tive GPA of 2.00 for admission and retention. All physi- 
cal education major courses must be completed with a 
grade of C or better. 



126 Kinesiology and Recreation 

Physical Education Studies (General) Sequence (B.S.): 

A student has the opportunity to select from a series of 
Physical Education courses to develop a plan of study. Stu- 
dents in the Physical Education Studies Sequence must 
have earned a minimum cumulative 2.00 GPA. 

Physical Education Studies Sequence Program of Study: 

— 40 hours required. 

— Required courses: 26-hour core of KNR 160, 181, 
182, 240, 254, 257, 280, 282. Select 3 additional 
KNR hours. 

— 14 additional hours from within the Physical Education 
Program are required for majors not selecting a spe- 
cialized sequence. A minimum of 8 hours of upper- 
division courses are required, 6 of which must be at the 
300-level. 

— A second major or minor, or an individualized program 
by advisement, is recommended. 

— Graduation requirements: all required Physical Education 
courses must be completed with a grade of C or better. 

Standards for Progress in the Major: 

After being officially admitted to the Physical Education 
Studies Sequence, the student must maintain a minimum 
cumulative 2.00 GPA. 

Teacher Education Sequences (B.S. in Ed.): 

The Physical Education-Teacher Education program 
for undergraduate majors leads to a K-12 specialist certi- 
fication. All Physical Education-Teacher Education 
majors planning on becoming certified teachers must 
apply for and be admitted to the University's Teacher 
Education Program (see Teacher Education Program sec- 
tion of this Undergraduate Catalog). 

Program Admission Requirements for New and 
Continuing Students: 

Admission to this academic program is limited and is 
based on space availability and the competitiveness of the 
applicant pool. Factors that may be considered include, but 
are not limited to: courses completed, cumulative GPA, 
hours completed, personal interview or written statement, 
and samples of work completed. For additional information 
on minimum requirements for admission and the application 
and selection process, visit www.FindYourMajor.ilstu.edu or 
contact the undergraduate advisor for the intended major. 

Upon acceptance into the Physical Education-Teacher 
Education (PETE) Program, the teacher candidate must 
maintain a minimum cumulative and minimum major GPA 
of 2.50 throughout their undergraduate program. Once 
accepted, the teacher candidate must meet all teacher educa- 
tion requirements, including, but not limited to "Standards 
for Progress in the Physical Education-Teacher Education 
Major." The New Transfer student must have passed all sec- 
tions of the Basic Skills Test prior to registering for addition- 
al coursework in the PETE program after the initial semester. 



Any Internal Transfer student wishing to become a 
Physical Education-Teacher Education (PETE) major must 
apply to the Physical Education-Teacher Education Program 
at Illinois State University. Current application deadlines and 
forms can be found at www.FindYourMajor.ilstu.edu. 

Once an applicant is accepted into the Physical Educa- 
tion-Teacher Education Program, the teacher candidate must: 

(1) maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.50 and a 
minimum major GPA of 2.50 each semester; 

(2) complete a projected program plan for graduation with 
the academic advisor for Physical Education-Teacher 
Education; and 

(3) be admitted to Professional Studies through the College 
of Education. 

Teacher Education Sequence Program of Study Leading 
to a K-12 Special Certificate: 

— 8 1 total hours required. 

— 55 hours in the following core and sequence courses 
required: 

— 20 hours in core courses: KNR 181, 182, 240, 254, 257, 
280, 282; 

— 35 hours in sequence courses: KNR 156, 158, 221, 225, 
242, 244, 245, 246, 247, 341, 364, 383, 391. 

— 26 hours in Professional Education requirements: (See 
the University- Wide Teacher Education section in this 
Undergraduate Catalog for Professional Education 
requirements); STT 399.74 (6 semester hours), 399.75 
(6 semester hours). 

Standards for Progress in the Major: 

Standards for Progress in the Physical Education- 
Teacher Education Major: 

1 . To progress through the program in a timely manner, the 
teacher candidate must continuously maintain a mini- 
mum cumulative 2.50 GPA and a minimum major 2.50 
GPA to remain academically eligible. 

2. A teacher candidate falling below the minimum GPA, 
cumulative or major, will be placed on academic pro- 
bation within the School of Kinesiology and Recreation 
for one semester. If after one semester the 2.50 cumula- 
tive and/or major GPA has not been reestablished, the 
teacher candidate will be removed from the PETE Pro- 
gram. A student who is not readmitted after one semes- 
ter of probation, but has a minimum 2.00 GPA, will 
have the choice to enter the Physical Education (general) 
Sequence or select another major on campus. 

3. The student may submit an application to the program 
after re-establishing the minimum academic require- 
ments. The Physical Education-Teacher Education 
Selection and Retention Committee review applications 
each September and February. Acceptance into the pro- 
gram is competitive (Please see Admission Require- 
ments for New and Continuing Students). 



Kinesiology and Recreation 



127 



4. A student who has not been retained in the PETE pro- 
gram may appeal for reconsideration to the Physical 
Education-Teacher Education Selection and Retention 
Committee, providing evidence as to why re-admittance 
to the program should be considered. 

MINOR IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
Secondary Physical Education Sequence: 

This is a Teacher Education program. 

Students wishing to minor in Physical Education- 
Teacher Education (PETE) must apply to the PETE Pro- 
gram at Illinois State University. Current application 
deadlines and forms can be found on the Apply To Your 
Minor Program within the iCampus Portal. 

— 27 hours in Kinesiology and Recreation required. 

— Required courses: KNR 158, 181 or 182, 225, 242, 244, 
245,257,341,383. 

The Secondary Physical Education Minor does not 
lead directly to teacher certification. Students seeking an 
additional teaching endorsement in this academic area 
should contact their advisor or the Illinois State Board of 
Education website (www.isbe.net) for specific certifica- 
tion requirements. 

Athletic Coaching Sequence: 

Students wishing to minor in Athletic Coaching must 
apply through the School of Kinesiology and Recreation. 
The number of students admitted to the minor each year is 
limited and highest priority will be given to the most quali- 
fied applicants. Applications are accepted in January for 
enrollment the following fall semester. Application forms 
are available at the School of Kinesiology and Recreation 
Web site and main office. 

— 24 hours in Kinesiology and Recreation required. 

— Required courses (18 hours): KNR 205, 207, 260, 306, 
320, 382. 

— Elective courses (6 hours): KNR 210, 211, 212, 213, 
214,215,216. 

Certification Opportunity: 

Students have the opportunity to qualify for the Ameri- 
can Sport Education Program (ASEP) certification. 



Recreation and Park 
Administration Program 

Degree Offered: B.S. 

Students may obtain advising material related to Recre- 
ation and Park Administration (RPA) in the School's main 
office. The Kinesiology and Recreation academic advisor 
will assist students with planning and completing an acade- 
mic plan of study. All major courses in RPA must be com- 
pleted with a grade of C or better. 



MAJOR IN RECREATION AND PARK 
ADMINISTRATION 

New Transfer and Internal Transfer Admission 
Requirements: 

1 . Students must have an overall minimum GPA of 2.00. 

2. Students must complete a departmental application. Appli- 
cations are available in the School advisement office. 

NOTE: The number of students admitted to the pro- 
gram may vary year to year depending on program 
capacity. Highest priority will be given to the most qual- 
ified applicants. 

Recreation Management Sequence: 

— 62 total hours required. 

— 39 hours in core courses: KNR 170, 171, 270, 271, 
298.30, 298.36, 370, 376, 378.30, 380, 398.30. 

— 12 hours in sequence courses: KNR 272, 275, 374, 382. 

— 1 1 hours in interdisciplinary courses selected with 
advisement from the following cognate groups: event 
management, outdoor and environmental education, 
youth, recreation sports, park planning, enterprise man- 
agement, and non-profit management. 

Certification Opportunity: 

Students graduating from this program are immediately 
eligible to sit for the examination to become a Certified 
Leisure Professional. 

Therapeutic Recreation Sequence: 

— 66 total hours required. 

— 39 hours in core courses: KNR 170, 171, 270, 271, 
298.30, 298.36, 370, 376, 378.30, 380, 398.30. 

— 12 hours in sequence courses: KNR 273, 278, 279, 373. 

— 15 hours in interdisciplinary courses: HSC 105; 
KNR 181; PSY 213, 350; 3 hours selected from 
approved health and human services and/or disability 
related courses. 

Certification Opportunity: 

Students graduating from the Therapeutic Recreation 
Sequence who have met all the NCTRC requirements 
(major and recommended courses including an approved 
internship) are eligible to apply to sit for the examination 
to become a Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialist. 

MINOR IN RECREATION AND PARK 
ADMINISTRATION 

— 24 hours required. 

— Required courses: KNR 170, 171, 270, 271, 370, 
376,380. 

— 3 hours of courses selected from: KNR 272, 273, 275, 
278, 279, 371, 373, 374, 377, 382. 



128 Kinesiology and Recreation 

Kinesiology Courses 

Some sections of these courses may be restricted to 
School of Kinesiology and Recreation majors. An optional 
locker and towel charge will be assessed for students in 
selected Physical Education activity courses. 

105 BADMINTON I 
1 sem. hr. 

Introduction to the basic strokes and strategies of badminton. 
Tournament play in singles and/or doubles. Not for credit if 
had KNR 1 50.20. Materials charge optional. 

106.02 BASKETBALL II 
1 sem. hr. 

Development of intermediate and advanced skills and strate- 
gies of basketball. 

108 BILLIARDS I 
1 sem. hr. 

Basic shooting techniques with focus on stance, bridge and 
cue ball contact. Experience in games of Basic Pocket Bil- 
liards, Rotation and Eight Ball. Materials charge optional. 

112 BOWLING I 
1 sem. hr. 

Development of basic skills and knowledge for the begin- 
ning bowler. Materials charge optional. 

113 PERSONAL FITNESS 
3 sem. hrs. 

The development of a personalized, comprehensive fitness pro- 
gram based on knowledge and understanding of the specific 
effects of exercise. Materials charge optional. Lecture and lab. 
Not for credit School of Kinesiology and Recreation major. 

114 NAUTILUS CONDITIONING 
1 sem. hr. 

Basic techniques and knowledge necessary to increase mus- 
cular strength through the use of nautilus resistive isotonic 
exercise equipment. Not for credit if had KNR 285. 

115 ADVENTURE EDUCATION 
1 sem. hr. 

Development of basic knowledge and skills in adven- 
ture education. Prerequisites: Insurance clearance, liability 
and medical release waiver required. 

116 FITNESS WALKING 
AND JOGGING 

1 sem. hr. 

Knowledge and techniques of walking and jogging as modes 
for developing and/or maintaining appropriate health-related 
physical fitness levels. Formerly KNR 133.45. 

119 GOLF I 
1 sem. hr. 

A basic course in golf designed for the beginner or high 
handicap golfer. Materials charge optional. 

126 AEROBICS 
1 sem. hr. 

Introduction to aerobics designed to develop and improve 
strength, flexibility, and cardiovascular endurance. 



127 SWIMMING I 
1 sem. hr. 

For the fearful or non-swimmer with no aquatic skills. 
Instruction in adjustment experiences, basic techniques of 
safety, survival, and propulsion. Materials charge optional. 

127.10 AQUATIC FITNESS 
1 sem. hr. 

Shallow water aerobic exercise and/or lap swimming pro- 
grams to develop and maintain physical fitness. May be 
repeated for credit once. Ability to swim not required. 

133 SELECTED ACTIVITIES 
1 sem. hr. 

Selected beginning and/or intermediate activities offered as 
experimental programs. Material charge optional. 

136 VOLLEYBALL I 
1 sem. hr. 

Basic skills, rules, and strategies involved in the game of 
volleyball, and application in tournament play. 

137 SOCCER 
1 sem. hr. 

Basic skills, rules, and strategies necessary for game play. Fun- 
damentals emphasized with application in competitive play. 

138 SLOW PITCH SOFTBALL 
1 sem. hr. 

Basic skills and knowledge of slow pitch Softball. Formerly 
KNR 133.17. 

142 TENNIS I 

1 sem. hr. 

Basic skills, rules, and strategies involved in the game of tennis, 
and application in tournament play. Materials charge optional. 

146 MILITARY PHYSICAL CONDITIONING 
1 sem. hr. 

Practical experience in the structure, techniques, and conduct 
of military physical conditioning to develop total fitness and 
leadership ability. May be repeated; maximum 4 hours. 

147 WEIGHT TRAINING 
1 sem. hr. 

Basic knowledge and concepts of use of resistive exercis- 
es to increase muscular strength and endurance. Partici- 
pation in an individual weight program. Not for credit if 
had KNR 285. 

154.40 STRESS MANAGEMENT 
INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS 

1 sem. hr. 

Study of stress and how it affects the body. Practice of 
stress management relaxation techniques, and teaching 
methods for relaxation. Prerequisite: Major/minor only. 

156 INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL EDUCATION: 
TEACHER EDUCATION 

2 sem. hrs. 

Identification of foundational concepts in physical edu- 
cation, including historical and philosophical orientation, 
sub-disciplinary movements, career development, and 
physical education issues. Not for credit if had KNR 160 
FOUND A TIONS OF HUMAN MO VEMENT. Prerequi- 
site: Major/minor only. 



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129 



158 INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES 
IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to planning and teaching physical education. 
Includes lesson planning, practice of teaching skills through 
micro teaching, peer teaching, analysis of teaching. Includes 
Clinical Experience: 20 hour, Type 1-4, 5-1, 6-15. 

164 INTRODUCTION TO EXERCISE SCIENCE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Foundations of exercise science, including history and phi- 
losophy, careers, professional organizations, certifications, 
sub-disciplines, research methods, and professional issues. 
Prerequisite: Major/minor only. 

180 FIRST AID AND CPR 

2 sem. hrs. 

First Aid, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and automated 
external defibrillation for accidents and sudden illnesses 
to become American Red Cross certified. Materials 
charge optional. Formerly FIRST AID. 

181 HUMAN ANATOMY 
AND PHYSIOLOGY 

3 sem. hrs. 

Gross structure and physiology of the human body; par- 
ticular attention to the locomotor system. Lecture and lab. 

182 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Emphasis on the nervous, circulatory, respiratory, and 
digestive systems. 

188 INTRODUCTION TO 
ATHLETIC TRAINING 
1 sem. hr. 

Introduction to the field of athletic training, including his- 
tory, professional developments, certification requirements, 
responsibilities, skills, facilities, and clinical settings. Pre- 
requisites: KNR 188.01 concurrent registration. 

188.01 CLINICAL PRACTICUM IN 
ATHLETIC TRAINING 
1 sem. hr. 

Introduction to the actual experience of athletic training by 
observation and clinical practice. Prerequisites: KNR 188 
concurrent registration. 

205 SCIENTIFIC PRINCIPLES OF COACHING 
3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to scientific principles that constitute the basis 
for sound athletic coaching practices. Not for credit if had 
KNR 181, 240, 280, or 282. Prerequisites: Major/minor 
only. Sophomore standing. 

207 FOUNDATIONS FOR SUCCESSFUL 
COACHING 

3 sem. hrs. 

Theory and applications of coaching concepts for the 
interscholastic and youth sport coach. Coaching certifica- 
tion available. Formerly THE COACH IN ORGANIZED 
SPORTS AND ATHLETICS. Prerequisites: KNR 205 or 
concurrent registration. Sophomore standing. 



208 DYNAMICS OF UNITED STATES 
CONTEMPORARY HEALTH 
ISSUES OC-SMT 

3 sem. hrs. 

Exploration and analysis of current health and lifestyle 
issues. Emphasis on how individuals, communities and soci- 
ety make health decisions. Also offered as FCS/HSC 208. 
Prerequisites: Inner Core and MC-IS category. 

211 BASKETBALL COACHING 
2 sem. hrs. 

A course for professional preparation of coaches for bas- 
ketball, including philosophy, techniques, scouting 
reports and tactics of the game. Prerequisites: KNR 207; 
Sophomore standing. 

212 FOOTBALL COACHING 
2 sem. hrs. 

Theory and techniques of basic offensive and defensive foot- 
ball, including history, development of trends, and modern 
innovations. Prerequisites: KNR 207; Sophomore standing. 

213 TRACK AND FIELD COACHING 
2 sem. hrs. 

Techniques/methods of coaching track/field, including philos- 
ophy, pedagogy, event training, skill analysis, conditioning, 
practice organization, competition, and meet administration. 
Prerequisites: KNR 207; Sophomore standing. 

215 VOLLEYBALL COACHING 
2 sem. hrs. 

Techniques/methods of coaching volleyball for pre-colle- 
giate levels, including philosophies, pedagogy, strategies, 
tactics, practice/competitive situations, administration, man- 
agement and public relations. Prerequisites: KNR 207; 
Sophomore standing. 

216 SOFTBALL COACHING 

2 sem. hrs. 

Techniques/methods of coaching softball for pre-collegiate 
levels including philosophies, pedagogy, strategies, tactics, 
practice/competitive situations, management and administra- 
tion. Prerequisites: KNR 207; Sophomore standing. 

221 TEACHING ELEMENTARY PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION 

3 sem. hrs. 

Methods of teaching elementary physical education; observa- 
tions and teaching experiences in schools; laboratory sessions 
on developmental^ appropriate physical education. Includes 
Clinical Experience: 20 hours, Type 1-5. Formerly ELEMEN- 
TARY PHYSICAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM. Not for 
credit if had KNR 358. Prerequisites: Major only. KNR 158, 
225, concurrent registration in KNR 245. 

222 PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR 
ELEMENTARY CLASSROOM TEACHER 
2 sem. hrs. 

Factors essential to program planning in physical education 
grades one through six. Types and progression of activities; 
methods and techniques of class organization. Observations 
of children and laboratory sessions in activities. Not for 
credit major. Includes Clinical Experience. Prerequisite: 
Junior standing. 




130 Kinesiology and Recreation 

225 MOTOR DEVELOPMENT 
3 sem. hrs. 

Study of changes in motor behavior across the lifespan, fac- 
tors affecting motor development and implications for life- 
long physical activity. Includes Clinical Experience: 6 hours 
Type 1 and 4. Formerly MOTOR DEVELOPMENT OF 
CHILDREN. Prerequisites: KNR 158, concurrent registra- 
tion. KNR 244. Major/minor only. All sections of State of 
Illinois Basic Skills Test passed. 

240 PRINCIPLES AND APPLICATIONS 
OF FIELD-BASED ASSESSMENT 

2 sem. hrs. 

Applied aspects of field-based fitness assessment, including 
test selection, implementation, and analysis. Formerly PRIN- 
CIPLES AND APPLICATIONS OF FITNESS TRAINING. 
Prerequisites: Major/minor only. KNR 181 and 182; KNR 
280 or concurrent registration. 

242 SECONDARY METHODS AND PRACTICES 
IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

3 sem. hrs. 

Development and administration of secondary physical 
education programs. Planning and teaching physical edu- 
cation activities at the secondary level. Includes Clinical 
Experience: 20 hours, Type 1-5. Not for credit if had 
KNR 241. Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: KNR 
158, 225; 221 or concurrent registration. Admission to 
Professional Studies. 

244 TEACHING TEAM SPORTS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Development of content knowledge and teaching skills of 
various team sports. Emphasis on teaching progressions, 
management, assessment, strategies, and tournaments. 
Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: Major/minor only. 
KNR 158, concurrent registration KNR 225. 

245 TEACHING INDIVIDUAL/DUAL 
SPORTS AND ACTIVITIES 

3 sem. hrs. 

Content knowledge and teaching skills and various individ- 
ual sports and activities. Emphasis on teaching progressions, 
management, assessment, and strategies. Materials charge 
optional. Prerequisites: Major/minor only. KNR 158, con- 
current registration KNR 221. 

246 TEACHING DANCE AND 
TUMBLING/GYMNASTICS FORMS 

2 sem. hrs. 

Fundamental skills and concepts of dance and 
tumbling/gymnastics. Safety procedures, skill develop- 
ment, instructional strategies, and assessment are included. 
Prerequisites: Major/minor only. KNR 158, concurrent reg- 
istration KNR 242. 

247 PROMOTING PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND 
FITNESS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

3 sem. hrs. 

Current activity levels/fitness of youth, promotion of lifetime 
physical activity, evaluative procedures, and implementing 
fitness activities into the curriculum. Not for credit if had 
KNR 281, 283, 285. Materials charge optional. Prerequi- 
sites: Major/minor only. KNR 158, 240 and 280, concurrent 
registration KNR 341. 



252 EMERGENCY ASPECTS OF 
ATHLETIC INJURIES 
3 sem. hrs. 

Emergency planning, prevention, and care for athletics. 
Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: KNR 298.1 1 or con- 
current registration. 

254 SOCIO-PSYCHOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES 
IN PHYSICAL ACTIVITY 

3 sem. hrs. 

Survey of cultural, philosophical, social and psychological 
factors influencing the nature, evolution and maintenance of 
informal and formal physical activities. Prerequisites: 
Major/minor only or consent instructor. 

257 MOTOR LEARNING AND 
PERFORMANCE 

3 sem. hrs. 

Study of processes involved in acquiring and perfecting 
motor skills and effects of aging on acquisition of those 
skills. Prerequisites: Major/minor only or consent instructor. 

260 ATHLETIC INJURY CONCEPTS 
FOR COACHES 

3 sem. hrs. 

An introductory course for coaches, with emphasis on the 
prevention and care of athletic injuries. Prerequisites: KNR 
207 or concurrent registration; sophomore standing. 

280 EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Application of human anatomy and physiology to the under- 
standing of physical education. Effects of exercise on body 
systems and performance. Prerequisites: Major/minor only. 
KNR 181 and 182; KNR 240 concurrent registration. 

282 BIOMECHANICS OF HUMAN MOVEMENT 
3 sem. hrs. 

Study of human movement based on principles of anatomy 
and mechanics of motion. Lecture and lab. Materials 
charge optional. Prerequisites: KNR 181 or BSC 181; 
PHY 105 or 108. 

284 PREVENTION AND CARE OF 
ATHLETIC INJURIES 

3 sem. hrs. 

An introductory course, with emphasis on the prevention and 
care of athletic injuries. Prerequisites: KNR 181 or consent 
instructor. Major/minor only. 

285 RESISTIVE EXERCISE 
INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS 

1 sem. hr. 

Instructor preparation for creating individualized resistive 
exercise programs for persons across the age span. Includes 
personal skill development. Prerequisites: Major/minor 
only. KNR 164, 240, 280. 

286 GROUP EXERCISE 
INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS 

2 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to leading several modes of group fitness 
classes for a variety of populations, including group leader- 
ship experiences. Prerequisites: Major/minor only. KNR 
164,240,280. 



Kinesiology and Recreation 



131 



288 THERAPEUTIC MODALITIES 
3 sem. hrs. 

An investigation of the theoretical, technological, and physi- 
ological basis of therapeutic modalities in athletic training. 
Prerequisites: KNR 181, 182, 188 or consent instructor. 

295 HONORS SEMINAR 

1 sem. hr. 

Introduction to independent Honors study; identification and 
definition of problems; selected methods for problem solv- 
ing; use of library resources. 

298.10 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 
PRACTICUM IN EXERCISE SCIENCE 

2 sem. hrs. 

Application of knowledge and skills in professional settings 
for Exercise Science. Fifty out-of-class hours required. 
Materials charge optional. Formerly PP: PRACTICUM IN 
EXERCISE SCIENCE AND FITNESS. Prerequisites: 
Major/minor only. KNR 164, 240, 280 or consent of instruc- 
tor. Junior standing. 

298.11 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: ATHLETIC 
TRAINING CLINICAL COMPETENCIES I 

1 sem. hr. 

Supervised instruction and practice of skills and competen- 
cies for the beginning (Level 1) student athletic trainer. 
Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: KNR 188, 188.01 
and admittance to the Athletic Training Education Program- 
Clinical Instruction Practicum. 

298.12 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 
ATHLETIC TRAINING 
CLINICAL COMPETENCIES II 

1 sem. hr. 

Supervised instruction and practice of clinical skills and com- 
petencies for the progressing (Level 2) student athletic trainer. 
Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: KNR 298.11 or 
consent instructor. 

298.13 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 
ATHLETIC TRAINING 
CLINICAL COMPETENCIES III 
1 sem. hr. 

Supervised instruction and practice of clinical skills and com- 
petencies for the intermediate (Level 3) student athletic trainer. 
Prerequisites: KNR 298.12 or consent instructor. 

298.14 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 
ATHLETIC TRAINING 
CLINICAL COMPETENCIES IV 
1 sem. hr. 

Supervised instruction and practice of clinical skills and com- 
petencies for the advanced (Level 4) student athletic trainer. 
Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: KNR 298. 13 or con- 
sent instructor. 

298.15 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: ATHLETIC 
TRAINING CLINICAL COMPETENCIES V 

1 sem. hr. 

Supervised instruction and practice of clinical skills and com- 
petencies for the advanced (Level 5) student athletic trainer. 
Prerequisites: KNR 298.14 or consent instructor. 



303 EXERCISE PSYCHOLOGY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Theory and application of social-psychological principles to 
leisure-time physical activity. Prerequisites: Major/minor 
only. Junior/senior standing or consent instructor. 

306 PSYCHOLOGY OF SPORT 
3 sem. hrs. 

Psychological principles and concepts applied to sport situa- 
tions and to individuals involved with sport activities. Pre- 
requisites: Major/minor only or consent instructor. 

307 EXERCISE IN HEALTH AND DISEASE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Application of exercise physiology principles to evaluate 
the extent to which common disease processes limit body 
function and exercise performance. Prerequisites: 
Major/minor only. KNR 164, 240, and 280. 

308 EXERCISE PROGRAMMING 
3 sem. hrs. 

Development of skills and knowledge necessary for designing 
exercise programs for all populations. Prerequisites: 
Major/minor only. KNR 164, 240 and 280; KNR 309 concur- 
rent registration. 

309 PRINCIPLES AND TECHNIQUES 
OF PHYSIOLOGICAL TESTING 

3 sem. hrs. 

Application of various laboratory exercise testing modalities 
for evaluating human physiological function. Materials 
charge optional. Prerequisites: Major/minor only. KNR 164, 
240 and 280; KNR 308 concurrent registration. 

310 FITNESS MANAGEMENT 

2 sem. hrs. 

Theories of organization and principles of management 
applied to fitness programs in the commercial, community, 
medical, and worksite settings. Prerequisites: Major/minor 
only. KNR 164, 298.10 or consent instructor. 

317 SOCIOLOGY OF SPORT 

3 sem. hrs. 

The social institution of sport is examined using such soci- 
ological concepts as social organization, culture, socializa- 
tion, deviance, social stratification, minority groups and 
collective behavior. Also offered as SOC 317. 

320 DEVELOPMENT ASPECTS OF YOUTH SPORT 
3 sem. hrs. 

Effects of sport and competitive activities on the biophysical 
and psychosocial development of young people. Prerequi- 
sites: Major/minor only or consent instructor. 

334 THERAPEUTIC EXERCISE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Essential components of a comprehensive rehabilitation 
program including goals, exercise selection, progression, 
evaluation, and criteria for return to competition. Prerequi- 
sites: KNR 288, or consent instructor. 

335 ADMINISTRATION OF ATHLETIC TRAINING 

2 sem. hrs. 

Theory and application in athletic training programs including 
pre-participation physical examinations, budget management, 
medical records, and legal aspects of sports medicine. Prereq- 
uisites: KNR 188, 284, or consent instructor. 




132 Kinesiology and Recreation 

341 ASSESSMENT IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Planning and implementation of appropriate assessment 
strategies in physical fitness, motor skills, cognitive achieve- 
ment, and the affective areas in K-12 physical education. 
Not for credit if had KNR 241. Prerequisites: KNR 158, 
221, 225, 242 or concurrent registration. 

342 OCCUPATIONAL BIOMECHANICS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Application of biomechanical principles to the solution 
of problems related to the interaction of the worker with 
the workplace. Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: 
KNR 282 or consent instructor. 

345 ADVANCED FUNCTIONAL ANATOMY 

3 sem. hrs. 

This course synthesizes anatomy, physiology, and human 
movement as it relates to sports injury. Prerequisites: KNR 
181, 182; Junior standing or consent instructor. 

352 QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS OF 
BIOMECHANICS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Amplification of kinematics and kinetics of human move- 
ments; introduction to high-speed videography, biomechan- 
ics instrumentation and computer analysis. Materials charge 
optional. Prerequisites: KNR 282 or consent instructor. 

353 BASIC ELECTROCARDIOGRAPHY 
AND CLINICAL EXERCISE TESTING 
3 sem. hrs. 

Theory and application of electrocardiographic analysis in 
the functional and diagnostic assessment of individuals. 
Prerequisites: KNR 181, 182, 280, or consent instructor. 

358 DIRECTED PRACTICUM IN 

ELEMENTARY PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Taken the semester prior to student teaching. Arranged Clin- 
ical Experience assignment that includes observation, partic- 
ipation, and teaching in elementary physical education. 
Includes Clinical Experience: 40 hours, Type 1-5. Prerequi- 
sites: KNR 158, 221, 225, 242; 341 or concurrent registra- 
tion. Admission to Professional Studies. Students must have 

2 consecutive hours between 8 a.m. and noon and 1 p.m. and 

3 p.m. (e.g., 9-11) free daily, during one half of the semester. 

361 PATHOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY 
IN ATHLETIC TRAINING 

3 sem. hrs. 

Relevant biomedical conditions and afflictions and asso- 
ciated pharmacological interventions for the athletic train- 
ing student. Prerequisites: KNR 181, 182. Junior standing 
or consent instructor. 

362 SEMINAR IN SPORTS MEDICINE I 

1 sem. hr. 

Orientation to and preparation for the professional practice in 
athletic training including formal application and placement. 
Not for credit if had KNR 384. Prerequisites: KNR 298.13 
concurrent registration. 

363 SEMINAR IN SPORTS MEDICINE II 

2 sem. hrs. 

Synthesis of program content in preparation for the 
BOC examination and initial employment. Not for cred- 
it if had KNR 384. Prerequisite: KNR 298.15 concur- 
rent registration. 



364 SENIOR SEMINAR IN PHYSICAL 

EDUCATION TEACHER EDUCATION 

3 sem. hrs. 

Examination of relevant issues regarding professional devel- 
opment in K-12 physical education: induction, program 
advocacy, legal issues, and personal reflection. Not for credit 
if had KNR 358. Prerequisites: Major only; KNR 341 con- 
current registration. 

378.10 SEMINAR IN PROFESSIONAL 

PRACTICE FOR EXERCISE SCIENCE 

2 sem. hrs. 

Orientation to the expectations and problems encountered 
during professional practice with application and place- 
ment in exercise science environments. Formerly SEMI- 
NAR IN PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE. Prerequisites: ES 
major only. KNR 164, 298.10 or consent instructor. 
Senior standing. 

382 LEGAL ASPECTS OF RECREATION 
AND KINESIOLOGY 

3 sem. hrs. 

Legal principles applied to recreation and kinesiology set- 
tings, with an emphasis on risk management practices. 
Formerly 289.43 LEGAL ASPECTS OF SPORTS, PHYSI- 
CAL ACTIVITY AND RECREATION Prerequisites: KNR 
Major/minor only; Senior standing. 

383 ADAPTED PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Study of conditions requiring physical education pro- 
grams to be adapted to meet the unique needs of stu- 
dents with disabilities. Includes Clinical Experience. 15 
hours, Type 4. Prerequisites: Major/minor only. KNR 

158,221,225. 

387 ATHLETIC INJURY ASSESSMENT I 
3 sem. hrs. 

The advanced study of lower extremity injuries, with 
emphasis on evaluation. Formerly EVALUATION OF ATH- 
LETIC INJURIES.LOWER EXTREMITIES. Prerequisites: 
KNR 181, 284, or consent of instructor. 

388 ATHLETIC INJURY ASSESSMENT II 
3 sem. hrs. 

The advanced study of upper extremity and internal injuries 
with an emphasis on evaluation. Formerly EVALUATION 
OF ATHLETIC INJURIES: UPPER EXTREMITIES. Pre- 
requisites: KNR 181, 284, or consent of instructor. 

391 CREATING POSITIVE LEARNING 
ENVIRONMENTS IN 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
1 sem. hr. 

Strategies for developing and implementing effective 
behavior management plans in physical education pro- 
grams based on sound education practices. Prerequisites: 
STT 399.74 and/or 399.75 concurrent registration or con- 
sent instructor. 

394 HEALTH ASPECTS OF AGING 
3 sem. hrs. 

Characteristics of the aging process and factors influencing 
adaptation and the quality of living. Also offered as 
FCS/HSC 394. 



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133 



398.11 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 
INTERNSHIP IN EXERCISE SCIENCE 
1-14 sem. hrs. 

Supervised internship done under the guidance of profes- 
sionally qualified personnel from business, industry, govern- 
ment, and University faculty. Materials charge optional. 
Formerly PP: INTERNSHIP IN EXERCISE SCIENCE AND 
FITNESS. Prerequisites: ES major only. Senior standing and 
all graduation requirements met or in progress. 

398.12 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 
INTERNSHIP IN ATHLETIC TRAINING 
1-14 sem. hrs. 

Internship experience in athletic training under the guid- 
ance of a qualified sports medicine professional. Materials 
charge optional. Prerequisites: AT major only. KNR 298.13 
or consent instructor; and KNR 362. 



Recreation and Park 
Administration Courses 

Some sections of these courses may be restricted to 
School of Kinesiology and Recreation majors. 

170 INTRODUCTION TO LEISURE 
AND RECREATION 

3 sem. hrs. 

Nature, scope, and significance of recreation and leisure. 
Introduction to the professional areas of recreation and 
leisure delivery systems. 

171 RECREATION LEADERSHIP 
3 sem. hrs. 

Development of activity planning skills, individual leader- 
ship skills, and group facilitation methods. Prerequisites: 
KNR 170 or concurrent registration. 

175 LEISURE IN SOCIETY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction of leisure in historical and contemporary per- 
spectives. Relationships between leisure and other societal 
institutions. Determinants of leisure behavior. 

270 RECREATION FOR PEOPLE 
WITH DISABILITIES 

3 sem. hrs. 

Leadership, assistive techniques/devices and disability issues 
related to recreation programming for individuals with men- 
tal, physical, social and emotional limitations. Prerequisites: 
Major/minor only. KNR 271 or concurrent registration. 

271 RECREATION PROGRAMMING 
3 sem. hrs. 

Comprehensive recreation program design including plan- 
ning, organizing, promoting, and evaluating programs in a 
variety of leisure service delivery systems. Prerequisites: 
Major/minor only. KNR 171. 

272 ENTREPRENEURIAL RECREATION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Study of the development, management, and future of 
recreation enterprises. Not for credit if had KNR 276, 277. 
Prerequisites: Major/minor only. KNR 298.30. 



273 INTRODUCTION TO THERAPEUTIC 
RECREATION 

3 sem. hrs. 

Foundation concepts of therapeutic recreation including histo- 
ry, philosophy, models, professional issues, and basic program 
delivery. Prerequisites: HSC 105 or concurrent registration. 
KNR 1 8 1 or concurrent registration. KNR 270, 27 1 . 

275 PLANNING AND DESIGN OF 
RECREATION FACILITIES 
3 sem. hrs. 

Techniques and principles of site planning, design, and devel- 
opment of facilities in parks and recreation settings. Prerequi- 
sites: Major/minor only. KNR 27 1 . 

278 THERAPEUTIC RECREATION 
SERVICE DELIVERY 

3 sem. hrs. 

Design of comprehensive and specific intervention programs 
used in the delivery of therapeutic recreation services. Pre- 
requisite: KNR 273 or concurrent registration. 

279 THERAPEUTIC RECREATION 
CLIENT DOCUMENTATION 

3 sem. hrs. 

Focus on systematic and accountable client documentation 
(assessment, treatment plans, progress notes, discharge/refer- 
ral summaries) for therapeutic recreation intervention pro- 
grams. Prerequisite: KNR 278 or consent instructor. 

295 HONORS SEMINAR 

1 sem. hr. 

Advanced readings and critical discussion of recreation 
with broad areas of concern in social, philosophical, and 
scientific bases. 

29830 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: INTERNSHIP 
AND COOPERATIVE EDUCATION IN 
RECREATION AND PARK ADMINISTRATION 

2 sem. hrs. 

Application of knowledge and skills in recreation program- 
ming to practical situations within a leisure service delivery 
system. Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: Major in 
Recreation and Park Administration; KNR 271, 298.36 or 
concurrent registration; Junior standing. 

298.31 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: INTERNSHIP 
AND COOPERATIVE EDUCATION IN 
COMMERCIAL RECREATION 
2 sem. hrs. 

Application of knowledge and skills in recreation pro- 
gramming to practical situations within commercial, 
tourism, or travel recreation delivery systems. May be 
repeated. Prerequisites: KNR 271 or consent instructor. 
Junior standing recommended. 

298.36 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE 

PREPARATION SEMINAR IN 

RECREATION AND PARK 

ADMINISTRATION 

1 sem. hr. 
Overview and investigation of professional practice prepara- 
tion. Prerequisites: Major in Recreation and Park Adminis- 
tration; KNR 27 1 or concurrent registration. Junior standing. 



134 Kinesiology and Recreation; Military Science 



370 ADMINISTRATION OF LEISURE 
SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Organizational management functions such as planning, 
marketing, and financial accountability in organized recre- 
ation and leisure delivery systems. Not for credit if had 
KNR 375. Prerequisites: Major/minor only. KNR 298.30 
or RPA Minor. 

371 OUTDOOR RECREATION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Overview of outdoor recreation concepts and management 
principles. Prerequisite: KNR 271. 

373 TECHNIQUES IN THERAPEUTIC 
RECREATION 

3 sem. hrs. 

Theory and application of facilitation techniques and inter- 
ventions used in therapeutic recreation services. Lecture and 
lab. Formerly LEISURE EDUCATION AND FACILITA- 
TION TECHNIQUES. Prerequisites: KNR 273 or consent 
instructor. 

374 ADVANCED RECREATION PROGRAMMING 
3 sem. hrs. 

Application of recreation programming principles to a field 
setting which includes assessment, planning, organizing, 
implementing and evaluation functions. Fieldwork 
required. Prerequisites: Major/minor only. KNR 298.30 rec- 
ommended. 

376 EVALUATING AGENCY SERVICES 
3 sem. hrs. 

Use and methods of evaluation, including conceptualization, 
implementation and report preparation, with application to 
leisure service delivery systems. Materials charge optional. 
Prerequisites: KNR 298.30. Major/minor only. 

377 PRACTICES AND ISSUES IN RECREATION 
AND TOURISM 

3 sem. hrs. 

Analysis of selected practices, issues, and current trends 
confronting commercial recreation business enterprises. 
Materials charge optional. Prerequisite: Consent instructor. 

378.30 PROFESSIONAL ISSUES IN RECREATION 
AND PARK ADMINISTRATION 

3 sem. hrs. 

In-depth analysis of selected trends, issues, problems con- 
fronting leisure service practitioners in contemporary set- 
tings, and professional practice selection. Prerequisites: 
Major only; KNR 298.30. Senior standing. 

380 ADMINISTRATION OF HUMAN 
RESOURCES IN LEISURE SERVICES 
3 sem. hrs. 

Administrative/management functions in the operation of orga- 
nized recreation and leisure delivery systems. Not for credit 
if had KNR 375. Prerequisites: Major/minor only. KNR 
298.30 or RPA Minor. 

381 SPECIAL STUDIES IN RECREATION, 
TOURISM, AND SPORT 

1-3 sem. hrs. 

Special work in research interests of students and faculty. 
Projects must be approved by the instructor. May be repeat- 
ed; maximum 6 hours. Prerequisite: Consent instructor. 



382 LEGAL ASPECTS OF RECREATION 
AND KINESIOLOGY 

3 sem. hrs. 

Legal principles applied to recreation and kinesiology set- 
tings, with an emphasis on risk management practices. For- 
merly 289.43 LEGAL ASPECTS OF SPORTS, PHYSICAL 
ACTIVITY AND RECREATION Prerequisites: KNR 
Major/minor only; Senior standing. 

398.30 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 

INTERNSHIP/COOPERATIVE 

EDUCATION IN RECREATION AND PARK 

ADMINISTRATION 

12 sem. hrs. 
Culminating experience of supervised internship done 
under the guidance of professionally qualified personnel 
in leisure service agencies and University faculty. Prereq- 
uisites: Major only; KNR 378.30. All graduation require- 
ments met or in progress. 



MILITARY SCIENCE (MSC) 516 

ROTC Building, 211 North University, (309) 438-5408 
Email address: arotc@ilstu.edu 
Web site: ROTC.HUnoisState.edu 

Chairperson: LTC Raymond Hart. 

Military Science Program 
General Department Information 

Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) is designed 
to be completed concurrently with the student's academ- 
ic degree. Students can complete the first two years of 
ROTC with absolutely no military service obligation. 
Veterans, National Guardsmen, Army Reservists, and 
students who complete a four week leadership course at 
Fort Knox, Kentucky receive constructive credit for the 
first two years (6 credit hours) of ROTC, and can com- 
plete the ROTC program in as few as two school years. 

Freshman through senior ROTC courses are offered 
every semester. These academic courses progress from intro- 
ducing the student to the Army's mission and organization, 
studying leadership principles and traits, to teaching students 
the duties and responsibilities required of officers in the twen- 
ty-first century. Each class has a leadership laboratory that 
meets once a week. At lab, freshmen through senior students 
train on basic military skills and receive the opportunity to 
develop leadership skills through hands-on application. Some 
of the skills learned during lab include rappelling, water sur- 
vival training, rifle marksmanship, first aid and CPR, map 
reading and land navigation, and basic tactics. 

In addition to regular on-campus training and activities, 
ROTC offers exciting and challenging weekend field train- 
ing exercises during the school year. Trips include a staff 
ride, an orientation visit to Fort Knox, Kentucky, and trips to 
local National Guard training areas to practice marksman- 
ship, land navigation, and tactical skills. 



Military Science 



135 



FINANCIAL AID 

Military Science students can receive outstanding finan- 
cial aid through Federal and State Army ROTC scholarships. 

Federal ROTC scholarships are awarded for a four, 
three, or two-year period. Students compete at the national 
level for these scholarships. Each scholarship can pay up to 
the full tuition and fees each semester, provides a book 
allowance of $ 1 ,200 a year, and a tax free monthly living 
allowance of $300 for freshmen to $500 for seniors, 
depending on scholarship status. 

State ROTC tuition waivers are awarded by the Profes- 
sor of Military Science at Illinois State University. The 
Redbird Battalion awards up to forty of these scholarships 
each semester to students in the ROTC program. 

EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES 

Several clubs complement the ROTC academic curricu- 
lum, and help students enjoy their college experience more. 

Ranger Club trains intensively on military skills such 
as land navigation, patrolling, and rappelling. They spon- 
sor the annual Ranger Challenge competition in which a 
group of ten cadets are tested on individual and team mil- 
itary skills. The Illinois State University Ranger Chal- 
lenge team competes with nineteen other university 
ROTC Ranger Challenge teams from around the geo- 
graphical region in an intercollegiate competition. 

Rifle Club fires .22 caliber and precision air rifles 
weekly at an indoor rifle range. They also participate in 
marksmanship competitions with other university ROTC 
programs during the school year. 

The Redbird Color Guard presents the national colors 
at home football and basketball games, as well as other 
local community events. 

Drill Team trains and competes in exhibition drill compe- 
tition with weapons. Exhibition drill normally involves spin- 
ning or tossing of the weapons and intricate precision 
marching. 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

Students who complete the ROTC program receive a 
commission as a second lieutenant in the Army after gradua- 
tion. The student has the option of serving in the National 
Guard or Army Reserve as a part time career, or on active 
duty in the Regular Army as a full time profession. ROTC 
graduates can also receive a minor in Military Science by 
applying through the Military Science Department. 

Lieutenants in the Army lead soldiers, while managing 
equipment, vehicle fleets, and financial resources. New lieu- 
tenants are routinely put in charge of and lead groups of up 
to fifty soldiers immediately after college graduation. 

Officer career specialties in the Army are as diverse as 
those found in the civilian sector. Some of the sixteen spe- 
cialties students can request as an Army officer include: 
Engineering, Personnel Management, Nursing, Signal 



Corps, Finance, Transportation, Medical Service Corps, Mil- 
itary Police, and Aviation. Except for the health professions, 
an officer's specialty in the Army does not have to be related 
to his or her academic degree in college. 

New lieutenants who go into the Regular Army serve on 
active duty for three or four years, and may then transfer into 
the reserves. Lieutenants commissioned in the National 
Guard or Army Reserve can opt to serve their entire tour in 
the Reserves. 

MINOR IN MILITARY SCIENCE 

Admission into the Military Science Minor program 
is by permission of the Department Chairperson follow- 
ing a special interview concerning eligibility and entry 
requirements. Interested students should make arrange- 
ment for an interview as early as possible but not later 
than the second semester of their sophomore year. 

— 35 hours required. 

— Prerequisites (4 hours): MSC 1 1 1 and 112; or satis- 
factory completion of Army Reserve Officers' 
Training Corps (ROTC) Leadership Training 
Course (may be taken for credit as MSC 203); or 
proficiency as approved by the Military Science 
Department Chairperson. 

— Required courses ( 1 2 hours): MSC 220, 22 1 , 240, 24 1 . 

— History (3 hours): HIS 278 or 279. 

— Written Communications (3 hours): ENG 145, 247 
or 249. 

— Human Behavior (3 hours): PSY 1 10 or 1 1 1 (4 hours); 
orSOC106. 

— Computer Literacy (3 hours): ITK 140, 150, or 155. 

— Math Reasoning (3 hours): MAT 1 13, 120, or 121. 

— Physical Education (4 hours): KNR 146. 



Military Science Courses 

101 INTRODUCTION TO LEADERSHIP: 
INDIVIDUAL EFFECTIVENESS 

1 sem. hr. 

Introduction to leadership from perspective of the member 
of an effective organization. Self-enhancement skills such 
as time management techniques, problem solving and deci- 
sion-making processes, and health enrichment actions. 

102 INTRODUCTION TO LEADERSHIP: 
TEAMWORK 

1 sem. hr. 

Basic leadership fundamentals, principles, and experiences. 
Relevant for all organizational leaders. Purpose is to exam- 
ine how the individual organizational member and the team 
are affected by leaders and leadership decisions. 

Ill APPLIED LEADERSHIP II 

2 sem. hrs. 

Examines leadership within military organizations and struc- 
ture. Introduces map reading fundamentals and application 
of land navigation principles using the lensatic compass and 
terrain association. Provides opportunities to exercise leader- 
ship skills to meet established goals and objectives within 
specific time constraints. 



136 



Military Sciences; Technology 



112 APPLIED LEADERSHIP 

2 sem. hrs. 

Provides more in-depth and critical assessment of leadership 
within American society. Students are challenged to learn 
and apply leadership principles. Group research projects 
designed to research, examine, and analyze leaders and 
leadership within community context. 

200 LEADERSHIP LABORATORY 
sem. hr. 

Provides development by practical application of the stu- 
dent's leadership skills through progressive training, plan- 
ning, execution, and assessment. Prerequisites: Concurrent 
registration in AROTC Basic or Advanced Courses. 

203 ROTC LEADERSHIP TRAINING COURSE 
6 sem. hrs. 

Provides instruction and practical application on basic mili- 
tary concepts of map reading, tactics, small group opera- 
tions, weapons, and adventure training. Training is presented 
off campus at Fort Knox, Kentucky. Provides constructive 
credit for first two years of ROTC. CR/NC only. Prerequi- 
site: Consent instructor. 

220 ADVANCED LEADERSHIP AND TACTICS I 

3 sem. hrs. 

Provides general knowledge and understanding of 
advanced leadership principles, small unit offensive oper- 
ations, land navigation, and the operating systems. Pre- 
requisite: Consent instructor. 

221 ADVANCED LEADERSHIP AND TACTICS II 
3 sem. hrs. 

Provides knowledge and understanding of advanced combat 
leadership techniques, small unit defensive operations, 
patrolling, and land navigation. Prerequisites: Registration in 
AROTC and MSC 220 or consent instructor. 

240 ADVANCED APPLIED LEADERSHIP I 
3 sem. hrs. 

Fundamental concepts of military justice; principles of 
court-martial and non-judicial punishment; staff princi- 
ples and procedures in the Army organizational structure. 
Part I of a two-semester capstone experience prior to 
commissioning. Prerequisites: Registration in AROTC 
Advanced Course or consent instructor. 

241 ADVANCED APPLIED LEADERSHIP II 

3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to professionalism and military professional 
responsibility. Provides students with a capstone experience 
in leadership studies before their transition to officership. 
Prerequisites: Registration in AROTC Advanced Course or 
consent instructor. 

242 LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT 
ASSESSMENT 

6 sem. hrs. 

Instruction and practical application in field training, demon- 
stration of leadership capabilities, and leadership opportuni- 
ties of problem analysis, decision making, and troop-leading. 
Training is presented off campus near Seattle, Washington. 
CR/NC only. Prerequisites: Registration in a ROTC 
Advanced Course. 



TECHNOLOGY (TEC) 

215 Turner Hall, (309) 438-3661 
Web address: Tec.IllinoisState.edu 



510 



Chairperson: Richard A. Boser. 

Tenured/Tenure-track Faculty: 

Professors: Boser, Dan Brown, Custer, Gokhale, Meier, 

Stier, Wilson. 

Associate Professors: Ryan Brown, Merrill, Reifschneider, 

Schmidt. 

Assistant Professors: Josh Brown, Devine, Park, Shim. 

General Department Information 

The Department of Technology is accredited by the 
Association of Technology, Management, and Applied 
Engineering (ATMAE). The department features programs 
focused on the creative, systematic application of knowl- 
edge utilizing human and natural resources involving tools, 
equipment, techniques, processes, procedures, scientific 
principles, and management skills to produce and distribute 
goods, services and information to cope with change or to 
control environmental conditions and their effect on soci- 
ety and culture. 

Technology students are required to select one of the 
following technology programs: B.S. in Construction 
Management, B.S. in Graphic Communications, B.S. in 
Industrial Technology, B.S. in Renewable Energy, B.S. in 
Technology Education. Students selecting the B.S. in 
Industrial Technology are required to select one of the 
following sequences: Engineering Technology or Indus- 
trial Computer Systems. 

HONORS IN TECHNOLOGY 

The Department offers honors work in the different 
departmental programs to majors who have completed 60 
semester hours with a cumulative 3.50 GPA. Students inter- 
ested in the program should see the departmental advisor. 
Requirements for honors in the Technology Honors Program 
are available in the departmental office, 2 1 Turner Hall. 

Technology Programs 

MAJOR IN CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT 

Degree Offered: B.S. 

Construction Management is an interdisciplinary cur- 
riculum that provides a background in construction means 
and methods, business administration, communication 
skills, architectural and engineering fundamentals, applied 
science, and mathematics. The goal of the major is to pre- 
pare construction professionals capable of managing pro- 
jects to completion from construction documents prepared 
by design professionals. Course work emphasizes the allo- 
cation of labor, equipment, and material to construction 
projects in order to achieve completion at maximum effi- 
ciency of time and cost. The program focus is on produc- 



tion and management capabilities. The Construction Man- 
agement major is accredited by the American Council on 
Construction Education (ACCE). Graduates are prepared to 
assume leadership positions in residential, commercial and 
specialty construction. Initial employment may include 
field supervision, project management, estimating, and 
scheduling. Positions are also available in related areas 
such as code enforcement, construction financing, product 
sales, quality control, and safety management. 

— 91 hours required. 

— 20 hours in General Education: MQM 100; PSY 110; 
CHE 102; MAT 120; PHY 105; and 3 hours from one 
of the following: CHE 204; GEO 202, 207; or PHY 207. 

— 52 hours in Construction Management core courses: TEC 
100, 117, 120, 121, 123, 222, 223, 224, 226, 229, 270, 
292.01, 313, 322, 325, 326, 327, 394, and HSC 272. 

— 6 hours of elective courses from the following: TEC 
111,217, 225, 240, 328, 329, 398 (3 hours); GEO 370. 

— 10 hours from the College of Business and Department of 
Economics including: ACC 131; ECO 105; and FIL 185. 

— 3 hours of management electives from the following: 
HSC 385; MKT 230; TEC 320, 330, 370. 

ALLOWABLE SUBSTITUTIONS FOR REQUIRED 
COURSES: 

— Acceptable substitutions for CHE 102 are CHE 110 and 
11 2, or CHE 140. 

— Acceptable substitutions for MAT 120 is MAT 144 or 
145. 

— Acceptable substitution for MQM 100 is ECO 138. 

— Acceptable substitutions for PHY 105 are PHY 108 or 
PHY 110. 

— Acceptable substitution for TEC 270 is MQM 220. 

— Acceptable substitutions for TEC 330 are ACC 131 and 
ACC 132. 

MAJOR IN GRAPHIC COMMUNICATIONS 

Degree Offered: B.S. 

Graphic Communications is a management-oriented 
technical curriculum related to the processes, products, ser- 
vices and opportunities within the diverse printing, media 
publishing and packaging industries. Students will learn 
about technology and management practices related to the 
production of graphic media in its many forms. Three unique 
concentrations within the graphic communications major 
may be pursued: (1) print media management, or (2) web 
media management, or (3) packaging graphics. The goal of 
the major is to prepare professionals to enter the field in 
positions such as project manager, production coordinator, 
structural designer, digital media manager, web media devel- 
oper, web administrator, quality control manager, sales rep- 
resentative, cost estimator, and production associate. 

— 78 hours required. 

— 17 hours in General Education: MQM 100; PSY 110; 
CHE 102; MAT 120; PHY 105. 

— 37 hours in Graphic Communications core: TEC 100, 
150, 151, 152, 243, 250, 253, 270, 313, 320, 330, 356; 
HSC 271 or 385. 



Technology 137 

— Students will select 1 8 hours of required courses from 
one of the following concentrations: 

Print Media Management Concentration: TEC 257, 

351,352, 353, 354, and 358. 

Web Media Management Concentration: TEC 245, 

283, 319, 348, 358, and 383. 

Packaging Graphics Concentration: TEC 116, 216, 

257, 317, 350, and 352. 

— An additional 6 hours of elective courses selected from 
the following: TEC 116, 245, 257, 283, 317, 319, 348, 
350, 351, 352, 353, 354, 370, 383, 398 (3 hours); ACC 
131; COM 160; ECO 105; FIL 185. 

ALLOWABLE SUBSTITUTIONS FOR REQUIRED 
COURSES: 

— Acceptable substitutions for CHE 102 are CHE 1 10 and 
112, or CHE 140. 

— Acceptable substitutions for MAT 120 is MAT 144 or 
145. 

— Acceptable substitution for MQM 100 is ECO 138. 

— Acceptable substitutions for PHY 105 are PHY 108 or 
PHY 110. 

— Acceptable substitution for TEC 270 is MQM 220. 

— Acceptable substitutions for TEC 330 are ACC 131 and 
ACC 132. 



MAJOR IN INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY 

Degree Offered: B.S. 

Engineering Technology Sequence: 

Engineering Technology is an interdisciplinary cur- 
riculum that provides experiences in the following areas: 
Automation, Product Design, Process Control, Plastic 
Materials, Quality Management, or Technical Project Man- 
agement. The goal of the sequence is to prepare profession- 
als capable of managing projects and processes in 
government and private enterprise settings. Course work 
emphasizes the management of people, processes, and mate- 
rials through hands-on activities. Initial employment oppor- 
tunities include: project management, process control, 
production management, product design, quality control sup- 
port, and technical sales. 

— 75 hours required. 

— 17 hours in General Education: MQM 100; PSY 110; 
CHE 102; MAT 120; PHY 105. 

— 13 hours in Industrial Technology core: TEC 100, 270, 
313, 330; HSC 271. 

— 33 hours of required sequence courses: TEC 111, 116, 
130, 216, 233, 240, 263, 285, 292, 320, and 392. 

— 12 hours minimum of sequence elective courses selected 
from the following: TEC 234, 244, 316, 345, 370 and 
398 (3 hours only); ACC 131 and ECO 105. Students 
should see the department advisor for specific course 
recommendations . 



138 Technology 

Industrial Computer Systems Sequence: 

Industrial Computer Systems is an interdisciplinary cur- 
riculum that provides a background in computer technology, 
software, programming, information imaging, and other 
industry-related technologies. The goal of the sequence is to 
prepare professionals for the management and supervision of 
technical computer systems in industrial settings. Course 
work emphasizes the use of computer systems to provide 
students with a diverse technical and professional back- 
ground in communications, networking, interfacing, and 
electronic principles related to industrial computer systems. 

— 78 hours required. 

— 17 hours in General Education: MQM 100; PSY 110; 
CHE 102; MAT 120; PHY 105. 

— 13 hours in Industrial Technology core: TEC 100, 270, 313, 
330; HSC 385. 

— 36 hours of required sequence courses: ITK 168; MAT 
108; TEC 143, 151, 243, 244, 245, 283, 284, 319, 383, 
and 390. 

— 1 2 hours of additional courses selected from the follow- 
ing: ITK 254; TEC 116, 117, 150, 216, 217, 240, 250, 
263, 317, 320, 345, 348, 352, 370, 398 (3 hours). 

ALLOWABLE SUBSTITUTIONS FOR REQUIRED 
COURSES: 

— Acceptable substitutions for CHE 102 are CHE 1 10 and 
11 2, or CHE 140. 

— Acceptable substitutions for MAT 120 are MAT 144 or 
145. 

- Acceptable substitution for MQM 100 is ECO 138. 

- Acceptable substitutions for PHY 105 are PHY 108 or 
PHY 110. 

- Acceptable substitution for TEC 270 is MQM 220. 

— Acceptable substitutions for TEC 330 are ACC 131 and 
ACC 132. 

MINOR IN INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY 

— 2 1 hours required through advisement. 

— 6 of the 2 1 hours required must be upper level course- 
work. 

— No more than 9 hours from the major program of study 
may be applied to the minor. 

— Courses must be chosen from the following list: TEC 
111, 116, 117, 120, 121, 123, 130, 143, 150, 151, 152, 
216, 217, 222, 223, 224, 225, 226, 229, 233, 234, 240, 
243, 244, 245, 250, 253, 257, 263, 270, 283, 284, 285, 
292, 313, 316, 317, 319, 320, 322, 325, 326, 327, 328, 
329, 330, 345, 348, 350, 351, 352, 353, 354, 356, 358, 
383, 390, 392, 394; and HSC 271 or 272 or 385. 

MAJOR IN RENEWABLE ENERGY 

Degree Offered: B.S. 

The Major in Renewable Energy is administered by 
the Department of Technology. Students will be admitted 
to the program from a pool of applicants on the basis of 
individual qualifications on a competitive and selective 
basis. The number of students admitted to the major may 
vary from year to year depending on program capacity 
and qualifications of the applicants. 



The Major in Renewable Energy prepares students for 
careers in renewable energy and related industries, includ- 
ing wind energy, solar power, and biofuels. The program 
provides the opportunity to specialize in technical aspects 
of the industry or in economics and public policy aspects 
of the industry. 

Technical Sequence: 

— 66 hours required. 

— 51 hours in required core courses: AGR 225; ECO 105, 
138*, 236, 239; GEO 211*; HSC 156*; MAT 120*; 
PHY 105*, 207*; PSY 110*; TEC 111, 160, 270, 320, 
360. 

— 15 hours in required courses for the Technical sequence: 
HSC 271 or 385; TEC 240, 263, 292, 345. 

Economics and Public Policy Sequence: 

— 66 hours required. 

— 51 hours in required core courses: AGR 225; ECO 
105, 138*, 236, 239; GEO 211*; HSC 156*; MAT 
120*; PHY 105*, 207*; PSY 110*, TEC 111, 160, 
270, 320, 360. 

— 1 5 hours in required courses for the Economics and Pub- 
lic Policy sequence: AGR 203*; ECO 255, 335; GEO 
205; POL 232. 

*NOTE: AGR 203, ECO 138, GEO 211, HSC 156, 
MAT 120, PHY 105, PHY 207, and PSY 1 10 are Gener- 
al Education courses. 

ALLOWABLE SUBSTITUTIONS FOR REQUIRED 
COURSES: 

—Acceptable substitution for ECO 138 is MQM 100. 

— Acceptable substitutions for MAT 120 is MAT 121, 144 

or 145. 
—Acceptable substitutions for PHY 105 is PHY 108 

or 110. 
—Acceptable substitution for TEC 270 is MQM 220. 

MAJOR IN TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION 

Degree Offered: B.S. 

Technology Education includes: (1) a study of the con- 
cepts practiced in modern technological systems of energy 
utilization, communication, production, and transportation, 
and engineering-related fields; (2) the development of cogni- 
tive, psychomotor, and affective skills in these four areas 
related to the use of tools, materials, processes, resources, 
techniques, scientific principles, work (skill and organiza- 
tion), and products as well as their impacts on society; and 
(3) the professional competencies of planning, executing and 
evaluating instruction. 

The following requirements are part of the entitlement 
program leading to certification; Secondary 6-12. Initial 
employment opportunities include: Junior High/Middle 
School Technology Teacher (middle school endorsement 
also requires PSY 302 and C&I 233), High School Technol- 
ogy Teacher, Vocational/Trade School Teacher, School Dis- 



Technology 



139 



trict Technology Coordinator, Community/Junior College 
Instructor, Industrial Trainer/Instructor. A cumulative and 
major GPA of 2.50 is required for student teaching and grad- 
uation. The Technology Education Program is accredited by 
the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) and 
NCATE/CTTE. 

— 84 hours required. 

— 4 hours General Education: PHY 105. 

— 35 semester hours of required technical core courses: TEC 
101, 111, 116, 120, 130, 150, 216, 243, 303, 304, 305, and 
MAT 108. 

— 15 semester hours of additional Technology elective 
courses. 

— 30 semester hours Professional Education courses that 
include: C&I 212, 214, 216; EAF 231 (EAF 228 or EAF 
235 may also be used to meet this requirement); PSY 
215; STT 399.33; TEC 307. Successful completion of 
100 clinical hours required before student teaching. 

If technology majors wish to be certified at the middle 
school, PSY 302 and C&I 233 are required. 



7. Work with clinic client 

8. Graduate practicum 

9. Professional meeting 

10. Other 

DOUBLE MAJOR 

Degree Offered: B.S. 

NOTE: Only core courses and acceptable substitutions 
(CHE 102; HSC 271; TEC 100, 270, 313 and 330; MAT 
120; MQM 100; PHY 105; PSY 1 10) may be used to meet 
the requirements for a double major in Technology. 

NOTE: Students completing requirements for two majors 
concurrently are eligible to receive only one degree. The 
degree awarded is based on the degree corresponding to the 
primary major. One diploma is issued to the student upon 
completion of both majors and all other degree requirements. 



Technology Courses 



MINOR EN TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION 

— 28 semester hours of required technical core courses: 
TEC 111, 116 or 150, 120 or 130, 303, 304, 305, 307; 
MAT 108; and PHY 105. 

— In order to teach, students completing a minor in tech- 
nology education must complete a sequence of profes- 
sional education coursework and student teaching in 
another teacher certification endorsement area. 

The Technology Education Minor does not lead directly 
to teacher certification. Students seeking an additional teach- 
ing endorsement in this academic area should contact their 
advisor or the Illinois State Board of Education website 
(www.isbe.net) for specific certification requirements. 

CLINICAL EXPERIENCES IN TEACHER EDUCATION 

Clinical Experiences are provided in off-campus clinical 
teaching centers, in local schools and in campus laboratory 
schools, in agencies and other approved non-school settings. 
All students will show verification of having completed pre- 
sident teaching field experiences commensurate with 
attaining local, state, and national standards. Students must 
provide their own transportation to Clinical Experience sites. 

The approximate number of clinical hours and type of 
activity associated with each course offering can be found 
with the appropriate course description. The following 
legend relates to the type and kind of activity related to a 
specific course. 

Clinical Experiences Legend 

1 . Observation 

2. Tutoring one-on-one contact 

3. Non-instruction assisting 

4. Instructional aiding a group 

5. Micro teaching 

6. Simulation lab exercises 



100 INTRODUCTION TO 
INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY 
1 sem. hr. 

Study of Industrial Technology, programs in the department, 
and career opportunities in Technology Education and 
Industrial Technology. Lecture. Materials charge optional. 

101 INTRODUCTION TO TEACHING 
TECHNOLOGY 

3 sem. hrs. 

Methodological insights and understanding for teaching 
technical subject matter; emphasis on observing pro- 
grams, developing, conveying and evaluating technology- 
based curricula. Includes Clinical Experience. Lecture. 

Ill FUNDAMENTALS OF POWER 
TECHNOLOGY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Principles of electrical, electronic, mechanical, and fluid 
power components and systems as they apply to industrial 
applications. Lecture and lab. Prerequisites: Major/minor 
only or consent of department advisor. 

116 INTRODUCTION TO TECHNICAL 
DRAWING AND CONSTRAINT-BASED 
SOLID MODELING 

3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to technical drawing with emphasis on Comput- 
er Aided Design (CAD) constraint-based solid modeling, 
sketching, and basic blueprint reading. Lecture and lab. Mate- 
rials charge optional. Formerly TECHNICAL DRAWING. 

117 CONSTRUCTION GRAPHICS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Studies in graphical representation of architectural and con- 
struction ideas. Emphasis on sketching, spatial visualization, 
and computer-aided drafting methods. Lecture and lab. Mate- 
rials charge optional. Not for credit if had TEC 1 10, 21 1 . Pre- 
requisites: Major/minor only or consent of instructor. 



140 



Technology 



120 INTRODUCTION TO BUILDING 
CONSTRUCTION 

3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to the principles, practices, and materials used 
in residential and light-commercial construction. Lecture. 
Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: Major/minor only 
or consent department advisor. 

121 CONSTRUCTION METHODS 

2 sem. hrs. 

Applications of the principles, practices, and materials used 
in residential and light-commercial construction. Lecture 
and lab. Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: 
Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 

123 CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS AND 
QUANTITY TAKEOFF 

3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to blueprint reading, construction specifica- 
tions, and quantity takeoff procedures. Lecture and lab. 
Prerequisites: TEC 120 or concurrent registration. 
Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 

130 INTRODUCTION TO 

MANUFACTURING PROCESSES 
3 sem. hrs. 

Secondary material processes including industrial 
machinery usage and study in the areas of forming, cast- 
ing, separating, joining, and conditioning. Lecture and 
lab. Materials charge optional. 

143 INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRONICS 
FOR DATA COMMUNICATION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Overview of the fundamentals, concepts, and theory of basic 
electronics essential to telecommunications systems. Lecture 
and lab. Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: MAT 108 
and 120. Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 

150 GRAPHIC COMMUNICATIONS 
TECHNOLOGY 

3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to the history, vocabulary, tools, materials, 
and process of the graphic communications industry. Lec- 
ture and lab. Formerly FUNDAMENTALS OF PRINTING 
AND IMAGING TECHNOLOGIES. Materials charge 
optional. Prerequisites: Major/minor only or consent 
department advisor. 

151 INTRODUCTION TO INDUSTRIAL 
COMPUTER SYSTEMS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Study and use of basic methods, materials, software and 
equipment used in industrial computer applications for imag- 
ing, graphics, and communications. Lecture and lab. Materi- 
als charge optional. Prerequisites: Major/minor only or 
consent department advisor. 

152 DIGITAL MEDIA APPLICATIONS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Study of technology used for digital media and communica- 
tions. Lecture and lab. Prerequisites: Major/minor only or 
consent department advisor. 



160 INTRODUCTION TO RENEWABLE ENERGY 
3 sem. hrs. 

An exploration of the technologies of renewable energy, 
emphasizing physical principles and practical applications 
of wind, solar, and biomass. Lecture and lab. Materials 
charge optional. 

175 LIVING IN A TECHNOLOGICAL 

WORLD MC-IS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Interdisciplinary course that analyzes social change through 
the lens of technology. Also offered as SOC 175. May not 
be taken under the CT/NC option. Lecture. Prerequisites: 
ENG 101 or COM 1 10 or concurrent registration. 

216 CONSTRAINT-BASED SOLID MODELING 
AND PRODUCTION DRAWINGS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Intermediate course focusing on constraint-based solid model- 
ing, technical drawing practices, and blueprint/tolerance inter- 
pretation. Lecture and lab. Materials charge optional. Formerly 
COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN AND DRAFTING. Prerequi- 
site: TEC 116. 

217 BUILDING INFORMATION MODELING 
3 sem. hrs. 

Using building information modeling systems to design and 
document architectural and construction ideas. Emphasis on 
modeling, annotating, and document creation. Lecture and 
lab. Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: TEC 117. 
Major/minor only or consent of instructor. 

222 MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL 
SYSTEMS FOR BUILDINGS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to design, operation, and installation of heat- 
ing, ventilation, air conditioning, plumbing, fire protection, 
and electrical systems. Lecture and lab. Materials charge 
optional. Prerequisites: TEC 120; MAT 120; and PHY 105. 
Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 

223 SURVEYING AND BUILDING LAYOUT 
3 sem. hrs. 

Principles and practices of surveying, building layout, and 
project control. Lecture and lab. Prerequisites: TEC 120; 
MAT 120. Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 

224 SOILS AND FOUNDATIONS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Principles and practices used in concrete and masonry struc- 
tures and the affect of soil characteristics on foundation design 
and construction. Lecture and lab. Prerequisites: TEC 120, 
121 . Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 

225 CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT 
MANAGEMENT 

3 sem. hrs. 

Equipment productivity, selection, allocation, economics, and 
safety related to residential and commercial construction. Lec- 
ture. Prerequisites: TEC 120; TEC 121 or concurrent registra- 
tion. Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 

226 CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTS AND LAW 
2 sem. hrs. 

Duties, rights, and liabilities of all parties to a construction 
contract. Lecture. Prerequisites: TEC 120. Major/minor 
only or consent department advisor. 



Technology 



141 



229 COST ESTIMATING AND 
PROJECT PLANNING 

3 sem. hrs. 

Integrated approach to the fundamentals of construction 
cost estimating, project planning, and scheduling. Lecture 
and lab. Prerequisites: TEC 117 and 123; MAT 120. 
Major/minor only or consent of instructor. 

233 CNC AND MACHINING 
3 sem. hrs. 

An introduction to metals machining processes with an 
emphasis on automation using Computer Numerical 
Control (CNC). Lecture and lab. Formerly METALS 
MACHINING PROCESSES. Materials charge optional. 
Prerequisites: TEC 111, 130; TEC 216 or concurrent regis- 
tration. Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 

234 ROBOTIC SYSTEMS INTEGRATION 
3 sem. hrs. 

An introduction to robotics including common applications, 
programming, safety, and integration principles. Lecture and 
lab. Formerly COMPUTER CONTROLLED EQUIPMENT 
IN MANUFACTURING. Materials charge optional. Prereq- 
uisites: TEC 116; TEC 1 1 1 or 143. 

240 ELECTRIC CIRCUITS AND MACHINES 
3 sem. hrs. 

Electrical principles and applications including circuit dia- 
grams, switches, relays, motors, and transformers. Lecture and 
lab. Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: TEC 1 1 1 or 
TEC 143 or concurrent registration. Major/minor only or con- 
sent department advisor. 

243 COMPUTER NETWORKING SYSTEMS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Implementation of the principles of local area network archi- 
tecture, including server and client hardware specifications 
and configurations. Lecture and lab. Materials charge 
optional. Prerequisites: Major/minor only or consent depart- 
ment advisor. 

244 DIGITAL ELECTRONICS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Operation, characteristics, and applications of discrete and 
integrated solid state devices in selected digital circuits. 
Lecture and lab. Materials charge optional. Prerequisite: 
Demonstrated equivalent competencies. 

245 FUNDAMENTALS OF OPERATING 
SYSTEMS IN INDUSTRIAL APPLICATIONS 
3 sem. hrs. 

The introduction of operating systems software to enhance 
productivity, control, and connectivity, using open source 
code and proprietary systems. Lecture and lab. Materials 
charge optional. Prerequisites: TEC 1 5 1 or concurrent regis- 
tration. Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 

250 GRAPHIC MEDIA COMPOSITION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Study of graphic media production technology to plan and 
create documents including advertisements, brochures, 
books, packages, and e-books. Lecture and lab. Formerly 
ELECTRONIC IMAGING TECHNOLOGIES. Materials 
charge optional. Prerequisites: TEC 150 or COM 240. 
Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 



253 IMAGE CAPTURE AND EDITING 
3 sem. hrs. 

Digital photography, scanning, image editing software tools, 
PostScript output, halftones, tone reproduction, densitome- 
try, and reproduction concerns. Lecture and lab. Formerly 
PHOTOMECHANICAL AND DIGITAL IMAGING SYS- 
TEMS. Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: TEC 150. 
Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 

257 PRINT MEDIA PRODUCTION 
3 sem. hrs. 

A study of printing production processes including lith- 
ography, flexography, screen printing, and digital print- 
ing production. Lecture and lab. Formerly IMAGE 
TRANSFER TECHNOLOGIES. Materials charge optional. 
Prerequisites: TEC 150. Major/minor only or consent 
department advisor. 

263 AUTOMATED FLUID POWER SYSTEMS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Theory and operation of fluid power circuits and intermediate 
level PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) programming. 
Lecture and lab. Formerly FLUID POWER MECHANICS. 
Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: TEC 111 or 143. 
Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 

270 MANAGING TECHNOLOGICAL SYSTEMS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Principles, practices and methods used to plan, organize, lead, 
and control technological systems. Lecture. Prerequisites: 
PSY 1 10 or concurrent registration. Major/minor only or con- 
sent department advisor, completion of 45 hours. 

275 TECHNOLOGY AND QUALITY 

OF LIFE OC-SMT 

3 sem. hrs. 

Future-oriented course that analyzes the interface of 
technology with social forces that cause social change 
and affect quality of life; includes technological assess- 
ment. Lecture. Prerequisites: Inner Core and MC-QR or 
MC-IS category. 

283 INFORMATION AND IMAGING 
TECHNOLOGIES 

3 sem. hrs. 

Principles of information and imaging systems including 
databases, web design, and digital imaging. Lecture and lab. 
Prerequisites: C or better in TEC 151. Major/minor only or 
consent department advisor. 

284 TECHNICAL COMPUTER APPLICATIONS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Application of computer hardware and software solutions 
to industrial production and control problems. Lecture and 
lab. Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: ITK 168 and 
TEC 283 or concurrent registration. Major/minor only or 
consent department advisor. 

285 INDUSTRIAL PLASTICS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Resins, processing, fabrication, injection molding, extru- 
sion, rotational molding, compression molding, thermo- 
forming, fiberglass lay-up, identification and testing. 
Lecture and lab. Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: 
TEC 130 or concurrent registration. Major/minor only or 
consent department advisor. 



142 



Technology 



292 MATERIALS TECHNOLOGY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to engineering materials, strengths of materials, 
and standardized testing procedures for determining 
mechanical and physical properties. IMS students take 292, 
Manufacturing Materials and Practices; CM students take 
292.01, Construction Materials and Related Practices. Lec- 
ture and lab. Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: MAT 
120 or concurrent registration. Major/minor only or consent 
department advisor. 

301 ADVANCED METHODS OF TEACHING 
TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION 

3 sem. hrs. 

Conceptual foundations and methodologies for teaching a 
standards-based technology education program at the ele- 
mentary, middle-level, or secondary school. Not for credit 
major/minor if had TEC 101. Lecture. Prerequisites: Tech- 
nology Education major, graduate student, alternate certifi- 
cation, or provisionally certified teachers only. 

302 CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT, 
TECHNOLOGICAL DESIGN 
AND PROBLEM SOLVING 

3 sem. hrs. 

Foundations and methodology concepts used to deliver and 
assess technology-based design and problem solving in the 
K-12 classroom/laboratory. Materials charge optional. For- 
merly TEACHING TECHNOLOGICAL DESIGN AND 
PROBLEM SOLVING. Prerequisites: Education major, 
graduate student, or practicing teachers only. 

303 ENGINEERING DESIGN 
3 sem. hrs. 

Foundational concepts of engineering design including his- 
tory, technology, tools, computer applications, pedagogical, 
and professional issues. Lecture and lab. Materials charge 
optional. Prerequisites: TEC 216; MAT 108 and PHY 105 
or concurrent registration. 

304 MEDICAL, AGRICULTURAL, AND 
BIO-RELATED TECHNOLOGIES 

3 sem. hrs. 

A study of technological systems related to medical, agricul- 
tural, and bio-related technologies. Lecture and lab. Prereq- 
uisites: TEC 101 or 301. 

305 TEACHING TRANSPORTATION, ENERGY, 
AND POWER TECHNOLOGIES 

3 sem. hrs. 

Instruction and practice developing, teaching, and assess- 
ing transportation, energy, and power technologies cur- 
ricula using a standards-based approach. Lecture and lab. 
Formerly TEC 201 TEACHING TRANSPORTATION 
TECHNOLOGY. Prerequisites: TEC 101 or 301 or 
demonstrated equivalent competencies. TEC 1 1 1 and 116 
or concurrent registration. 

306 COORDINATION TECHNIQUES 
OF COOPERATIVE VOCATIONAL 
EDUCATION PROGRAMS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Coordination techniques needed for high school and post- 
secondary teacher-coordinators in integrating classroom 
activities with daily employment. Also offered as BTE/FCS 
382. Includes Clinical Experience. 



307 COMPETENCIES FOR TEACHING 
4 sem. hrs. 

Curriculum planning, teaching, and evaluation strategies, 
and professionalism for Technology Education teachers. 
Includes Clinical Experience. Lecture. Formerly TEC 203. 
Prerequisites: TEC 305 and C&I 216 or concurrent registra- 
tion. Concurrent registration in Student Teaching or within 
one semester. 

313 QUALITY SYSTEMS FOR TECHNOLOGY 
3 sem. hrs. 

A managed quality system using statistical tools; control 
charts, paretos, histograms, scattergrams, flowcharts and 
problem-solving techniques for continuous improve- 
ment. Lecture. Prerequisites: MQM 100; MAT 120; 8 
hours in a TEC sequence. Major/minor only or consent 
department advisor. 

316 COMPUTER-AIDED PRODUCT DESIGN 
3 sem. hrs. 

Development of advanced skill in the use of parametric and 
associative design methods through product design and pro- 
totype development projects. Lecture and lab. Materials 
charge optional. Not for credit if had TEC 3 1 5 or TEC 3 1 8. 
Prerequisite: TEC 216. 

317 COMPUTER-AIDED RENDERING 
AND ANIMATION 

3 sem. hrs. 

Using computer systems to create renderings and animat- 
ed presentations of design ideas in an industrial or archi- 
tectural setting. Lecture and lab. Prerequisites: TEC 1 16 or 
217. Major/minor only or consent instructor. 

319 COMPUTER GRAPHICS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Combination of graphic techniques and computer program- 
ming as means of industrial communication applied to solu- 
tion and interpretation of technological problems. Lecture 
and lab. Prerequisites: C or better in TEC 283. Major/minor 
only or consent department advisor. 

320 PROJECT MANAGEMENT 
3 sem. hrs. 

Fundamentals of project management emphasizing plan- 
ning techniques to meet stakeholder expectations regarding 
project scope, time, cost, and quality. Lecture. Prerequi- 
sites: TEC 270 and completion of 60 hours. 

322 BUILDING CODES AND INSPECTION 

2 sem. hrs. 

Analysis of model building codes and their application and 
administration for minimum standards of public safety and 
welfare. Lecture. Prerequisites: TEC 120. Major/minor 
only or consent department advisor. Junior standing. 

325 COMPUTERIZED ESTIMATING 
AND SCHEDULING 

3 sem. hrs. 

Integrated approach to computerized estimating and 
scheduling as methods of project control. Lecture and 
lab. Prerequisites: TEC 222, 224, and 229. Major/minor 
only or consent department advisor. 



Technology 



143 



326 CONSTRUCTION FINANCE 
AND ACCOUNTING 

3 sem. hrs. 

Practical application of financial and accounting funda- 
mentals specific to the construction industry. Lecture 
and lab. Prerequisites: ACC 131, ECO 105; and MAT 
120. Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 

327 DESIGN OF BUILDING STRUCTURES 
3 sem. hrs. 

Analysis and design of permanent and temporary structural 
systems for wood, steel, and concrete construction. Lecture. 
Prerequisites: TEC 292; MAT 120; and PHY 105. 
Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 

328 RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT 
3 sem. hrs. 

Principles and practices of residential development 
including land acquisition and improvement, regulations, 
construction, and sales. Lecture. Prerequisites: ECO 105; 
TEC 229 and Junior standing. Major/minor only or con- 
sent department advisor. 

329 SUSTAINABLE BUILDINGS AND 
URBAN DEVELOPMENT 

3 sem. hrs. 

Principles and practices of sustainable development in urban 
environments including building, transportation, and neigh- 
borhoods. Lecture. Prerequisites: TEC 120 or 21 1 and Junior 
standing. Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 

330 APPLIED ECONOMIC ANALYSIS 
FOR TECHNOLOGISTS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Applied economic techniques used to determine the relative 
worth of alternative systems, products, and services. Lecture 
and lab. Prerequisites: MAT 120 and six credit hours of 
200-level TEC coursework. Major/minor only or consent 
department advisor. 

345 PROCESS CONTROL NETWORKS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) programming within 
process control networks connecting machines, devices, sen- 
sors, and computers. Lecture and lab. Formerly INDUSTRI- 
AL PROCESSOR CONTROL. Materials charge optional. 
Prerequisites: TEC 240 and 263 or demonstrated equivalent 
competencies. 

348 SELECTED TOPICS IN INDUSTRIAL 
COMPUTER SYSTEMS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Study of advanced topics in computer technology, with 
laboratory experiences that apply current knowledge and 
skills. Lecture and lab. May repeat if content differs; maxi- 
mum 6 hours. Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: 
TEC 245 and completion of 75 hours or consent instructor. 
Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 

349 TECHNICAL WRITING II 
3 sem. hrs. 

Instruction and practice in editing, proposals, and analyti- 
cal writing; attention given to style manuals, research writ- 
ing, and (as needed) publication. Lecture. Also offered as 
ENG 349. Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: ENG 
249 or graduate standing. 



350 PACKAGE DESIGN AND PRODUCTION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Study of design, materials, and production processes used 
in the manufacture of packages and displays. Lecture, lab 
and field trips. Formerly FLEXOGRAPHY. Materials 
charge optional. Prerequisites: TEC 257. Major/minor only 
or consent of department advisor. 

351 ADVANCED IMAGE TRANSFER SYSTEMS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Advanced study of the printing processes, materials, and 
converting processes used in the production of high volume 
print products. Lecture and field trips. Prerequisites: TEC 
257. Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 

352 ADVANCED PREPRESS TECHNOLOGY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Utilization of advanced pre-press methods and technologies in 
the creation and management of print media. Lecture, labs and 
field trips. Formerly ADVANCED PREPRESS TECHNIQUES 
Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: TEC 250. 
Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 

353 COLOR MANAGEMENT 
3 sem. hrs. 

Study of color theory and measurement, device calibra- 
tion and profiling, color reproduction variables, color 
proofing, and color management workflow. Lecture, 
labs and field trips. Formerly COLOR REPRODUC- 
TION TECHNIQUES. Materials charge optional. Pre- 
requisites: TEC 253. Major/minor only or consent 
department advisor. 

354 PRINT PRODUCTION PLANNING AND 
PROFITABILITY 

3 sem. hrs. 

Printing production workflow analysis, cost estimating, 
scheduling, job costing, and profitability. Use of computer- 
assisted management software. Lecture. Formerly MAN- 
AGING PRINTING AND IMAGING TECHNO-LOGIES. 
Prerequisites: TEC 257. Major/minor only or consent 
department advisor. 

356 GRAPHIC COMMUNICATIONS 
BUSINESS PRACTICES 
3 sem. hrs. 

Current management trends in the profession, with specific 
emphasis on production management and legal issues for 
graphic communications businesses. Lecture. Formerly 
MANAGING PRODUCTION IN PRINTING/IMAGING 
TECHNOLOGIES. Prerequisites: TEC 257. Major/minor 
only or consent department advisor. 

358 DIGITAL MEDIA MANAGEMENT 
3 sem. hrs. 

Study of web publishing, digital asset management, vari- 
able data printing, and networking issues for graphic 
communications businesses. Lecture, labs and field trips. 
Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: TEC 319 or 
354. Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 

360 RENEWABLE ENERGY CAPSTONE 
3 sem. hrs. 

A synthesis of the skills and knowledge acquired in the RE 
major coursework with final project in economic/technolo- 
gy track. Prerequisites: TEC 345 or ECO 335 or concurrent 
registration and 45 hours in major. Major/minor only or con- 
sent department advisor. 



144 



Technology 



370 SUPPLY CHAIN LOGISTICS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Supply chain networks for technology-based companies. 
Activities associated with transforming goods from raw 
materials through delivery to end user. Lecture. Prerequi- 
sites:TEC 270 or concurrent registration. Major/minor only 
or consent department advisor. Completion of 60 hours or 
graduate standing. 

383 TELECOMMUNICATIONS 
TECHNOLOGY 

3 sem. hrs. 

Interfacing computers locally and through telecommunica- 
tions networks. Identification of existing standards and hard- 
ware and evaluation of specific needs. Lecture and lab. 
Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: TEC 243 or ITK 
254. Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 

390 INDUSTRIAL COMPUTER 
APPLICATIONS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Development of managers and supervisors with technical 
and professional background in communications, net- 
working, and interfacing, related to computer systems. 
Lecture and lab. Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: 
TEC 270 and PHY 105; 9 senior hours of technical courses 
in Industrial Computer Systems Sequence. Major/minor only 
or consent department advisor. 

392 MANUFACTURING ORGANIZATION 
AND MANAGEMENT 

3 sem. hrs. 

The study of industrial production systems including 
product, manufacturing, and plant engineering through 
the managing of a production project. Lecture and lab. 
Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: TEC 270 and 9 
senior hours of technical coursework in the Integrated Man- 
ufacturing Systems Sequence and senior standing or consent 
instructor. Major/minor only or consent department advisor. 



394 CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT 
AND ADMINISTRATION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Principles, practices, and standard documentation utilized 
in construction project management and administration. 
Lecture and lab. Prerequisites: TEC 226; 325 or concur- 
rent registration; TEC 398 or 800 hours documented con- 
struction experience. Major/minor only or consent 
department advisor. 

398 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: DEPARTMENT 
OF TECHNOLOGY 
1-8 sem. hrs. 

Planned and supervised management-oriented work-study 
experiences in businesses, industries, and governmental 
agencies. Forty hours of work per credit hour. Internship and 
Coop options listed separately below. CR/NC only. No more 
than 3 hours may apply toward major. May be repeated: 
maximum 16 hours applicable for graduation. Prerequisites: 
Major only. ISU overall and major GPA of 2.50 and consent 
of department Professional Practice Coordinator. Evidence 
of health insurance required. Please see student manual for 
additional information and application procedures. 

398.02 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 
INTERNSHIP IN TECHNOLOGY 
1-8 sem. hrs. 

Eight-week full-time/320 hours part-time minimum work 
term duration. CR/NC only. Prerequisites: Must have com- 
pleted at least 30 hours of college course work. Completion 
of 12 hours coursework at ISU. TEC 100-level required 
courses and three hours of 200/3 00-level courses in your 
TEC sequence. 

398.52 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 
COOP IN TECHNOLOGY 
1-8 sem. hrs. 

Eight-week full-time/320 hours part-time minimum work 
term duration; 3 work terms minimum. CR/NC only. Pre- 
requisites: TEC 100-level required courses. 



145 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Interim Dean: James E. Payne 141 Stevenson Hall. 

Web address: www.CAS.ilstu.edu 

The College of Arts and Sciences provides the opportuni- 
ty for a liberal education in addition to the attainment of 
career-oriented skills. The College includes the Departments 
of Chemistry; Communication Sciences and Disorders; Eco- 
nomics; English; Geography-Geology; History, Languages, 
Literatures, and Cultures; Mathematics; Philosophy; Physics; 
Politics and Government; Psychology; Sociology-Anthropol- 
ogy; and the Schools of Biological Sciences; Communication; 
and Social Work; as well as the program in Women's and 
Gender Studies. The College offers the core of the General 
Education Program required of all undergraduates, a wide 
range of academic major and minor programs for meeting 
baccalaureate degree requirements, master's programs in 
most disciplines and doctoral programs in Audiology, Biolog- 
ical Sciences, English Studies, Mathematics, and Psychology. 
Course offerings span the humanities, social and behavioral 
sciences, natural sciences, and mathematics. 

Foreign Language Requirement: 

All graduates of the College of Arts and Sciences must 
satisfy a foreign language graduation requirement that may 
be met by: 3 years of one foreign language in high school or 
completion of the second semester or higher of college-level 
foreign language with a passing grade or equivalent profi- 
ciency as determined by examination. Students who have 
successfully completed one semester of college foreign lan- 
guage credit may elect to satisfy this requirement by studying 
abroad in an approved program in a non-English speaking 
country. American Sign Language may also be used to fulfill 
this requirement by transfer credit or by proficiency. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE INSTITUTE 

Under the auspices of the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences, the English Language Institute (ELI) provides a 
special non-degree intensive program (20 hours per 
week) in English as a Second Language for international 
students who wish to increase their English proficiency 
for college-level work or for international students on 
exchange programs. After the first semester, qualifying 
students can enroll in one regular University class in 
addition to their ELI program. In general, students enroll 
at ELI as full-time students for a semester or more. 

Although admission to ELI does not guarantee subse- 
quent admission to a degree program at the University, 
ELI students who attain a satisfactory TOEFL score can be 
admitted to a degree program at the University, provided 
they also meet the other requirements for admission. 
Hence, international students who do not have the mini- 
mum TOEFL score for admission to a degree program are 
encouraged to attend ELI first to prepare for admission to 
such a program at the University. 



For further information, contact the English Language 
Institute, Campus Box 6123; Fax: (309) 438-3031; Phone: 
(309) 438-2072; Email: ELI@IllinoisState.edu; Website: 
www.ELI.ilstu.edu. 

ARTS AND SCIENCES PROGRAMS 

The College of Arts and Sciences participates in the 
Major in Interdisciplinary Studies and the minors in 
African-American Studies; African Studies; Children's 
Studies; Cognitive Science; Civic Engagement and 
Responsibility; Ethnic Studies; International Studies; Latin 
American, Caribbean, and Latino/a Studies; Middle East- 
ern and South Asian Studies; Native American Studies; 
Peace and Conflict Resolution Studies; and Women's and 
Gender Studies. For further information, please consult the 
section entitled "University-Wide Curriculum" in this 
Undergraduate Catalog. 



Women's and Gender 
Studies Program (WGS) 



426 



Rachel Cooper 237, Campus Box 4260, (309) 438-2947 
Web address: WomenAndGenderStudies.ilstu.edu 

Director: Alison Bailey 

237 Rachel Cooper, Campus Box 4260 

(309)438-2947 

The minor in Women's and Gender Studies enhances 
any undergraduate major by integrating a working 
knowledge of gender issues with the student's field(s) of 
study. Women's and Gender Studies employs gender as 
an analytical category, along with race, class, and ethnic- 
ity, to focus on women's contributions to society and the 
gendered implications of cultural, political, and econom- 
ic processes. By broadening a student's knowledge base, 
this interdisciplinary minor has theoretical and practical 
applications for scholarship, the workplace, personal 
growth and relationships. 

— 2 1 hours required. 

— Required courses: WGS 120; ENG 160; HIS 261 or 
262; PHI 246. 

— 9 hours of additional courses from: ANT 270; CJS 
339; COM 128 or ENG 128 or LAN 128; ECO 230; 
ENG 206 or LAN 206; ENG 260, 261, 360; FCS 1 12 
or HIS 1 12 or SOC 1 12; FCS 222, 233, 327; HIS 261 
or HIS 262 if not chosen to fulfill requirement, HIS 
264, 330; IDS 121.39; PHI 202; POL 225, 337, 338; 
PSY 123 or SOC 123; PSY 305; SOC 264, 265, 341, 
342, 366; WGS 390, 391, 392, 398. 

NOTE: This program must be planned in consultation 
with the Women's and Gender Studies director or advi- 
sor. With their approval courses other than those listed 
above may be counted toward the minor. 



146 Biological Sciences 

BIOLOGICALSOENCES(BSQ 412 

210 Julian Hall, (309) 438-3669 

Web address: www.Bio.IllinoisState.edu 

Chairperson: Craig Gatto. 

TenuredVTenure-track Faculty: 

Distinguished Professors: Jayaswal, Juliano, Wilkinson. 

Professors: Armstrong, Cheung, Garris, Katz, Preston, 

Sakaluk, Whitman. 

Associate Professors: Bowden, Byers, Capparella, Cook, 

Edwards, Gatto, Loew, Moore, Nichols, Perry, Rubin, Sed- 

brook, Vogel. 

Assistant Professors: Casto, Kirik, Larson. 

General School Information 

Program Admission Requirements for New and 
Continuing Students: 

Admission to this academic program is limited and is 
based on space availability and the competitiveness of the 
applicant pool. Factors that may be considered include, but 
are not limited to: courses completed, cumulative GPA, 
hours completed, personal interview or written statement, 
and samples of work completed. For additional information 
on minimum requirements for admission and the application 
and selection process, visit www.FindYourMajor.ilstu.edu or 
contact the undergraduate advisor for the intended major. 

ASSOCIATED MINORS 

The School of Biological Sciences offers course work 
that contributes to the interdisciplinary Minor in Cognitive 
Science. For further information on this minor and advi- 
sor, consult the University-Wide Curriculum section in 
this Undergraduate Catalog. 

HONORS IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

In order to graduate with honors in Biological Sci- 
ences, a student must complete: (1) all regular require- 
ments for the Biological Sciences Major; (2) 1 semester 
biochemistry; (3) Mathematics through 2 semesters of 
calculus; (4) 12 hours of Biological Sciences on a tutorial 
basis (i.e., in-course honors) with a grade of A or B in each; 
(5) 3 hours of BSC 299; (6) 1 hour BSC 303; and (7) have at 
the time of graduation a cumulative GPA of at least 3.30 and 
at least 3.50 in Biological Sciences courses. 

Biological Sciences Programs 

Degrees Offered: B.S. 

MAJOR IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

— 37 hours in Biological Sciences required. 

- Required core courses (* denotes laboratory courses): 
BSC 196*, 197*, 204, 219, and 297. 

— Additional core courses required: Choose two of the 
following: BSC 201*, 203, 212*, 260*, or 283*. 



— Students must complete six BSC courses with laborato- 
ries (*). 

— Students must receive a C or better in BSC required core 
courses. 

— Students must pass one BSC course of at least 3 credit 
hours at the 300-level. BSC 398 does not fulfill this 
requirement. 

— Required non-core courses: CHE 220 or 230 and 231; 
PHY 105, 108 or 110; MAT 120 and 121 or MAT 145 
and 146. NOTE: Either ECO 138, GEO 138, POL 138, 
or PSY 138 may substitute for MAT 146. 

— BSC 202, 307, and Biological Science courses below 
195 may not be used in the major. 

— A minimum of 12 hours in Biological Science cours- 
es must be completed at Illinois State University. 

Organismal Biology and Public Outreach Sequence: 

Majors selecting this sequence seek broad organismal 
expertise and experience in public outreach for science edu- 
cation. This sequence is designed for students seeking edu- 
cational jobs and careers in arboreta, botanical gardens, 
environmental and nature centers, museums, and zoos. The 
minimum requirements for this sequence are: 

— 39 total hours in Biological Sciences required. 

— Required core courses: BSC 196*, 197*, 201*, 203, 
219, and 297. 

— Additional core courses required: Choose one of the fol- 
lowing: BSC 203, 212*, 260* or 283*. 

— 14 hours minimum in organismal courses required, at 
least two of which must be laboratory courses (*): BSC 
211*, 212*, 223*, 283*, 286*, 290, 292*, 294, 295*, 
296, 301*, 311*, 325, 330*, 333*, 335/336*, 337*, 
375/376, 378/379*, 396*. 

— Obtain a minimum of 120 hours of direct experience in 
public outreach (2 credit hours of Professional Practice, 
BSC 398). 

— Students must complete six BSC courses with laborato- 
ries (*). 

— Students must receive a C or better in BSC core courses 
(196, 197, 201, 203, 219, 297, and chosen option). 

— Students must pass one BSC course of at least 3 credit 
hours at the 300-level. BSC 398 does not fulfill this 
requirement. 

— Required non-core courses: CHE 220 or 230 and 231; 
PHY 105, 108, or 1 10; MAT 120 and 121, or MAT 145 
and 146. NOTE: Either ECO 138, GEO 138, POL 138, 
or PSY 138 may substitute for MAT 146. 

— BSC 202, 307, and Biological Sciences courses below 
195 may not be used in the major. 

— A minimum of 12 hours in Biological Sciences cours- 
es must be completed at Illinois State University. 

Teacher Certification Sequence: 

Students pursuing a Biological Sciences major may 
be certified to teach high school science. 

Before being admitted to the University Professional 
Studies program (see University- Wide Teacher Education 
program requirements in this Undergraduate Catalog), the 



Biological Sciences major must meet departmental require- 
ments for admission. Students should see the departmental 
Teacher Education advisor for information. 

Consult the Teacher Education advisor for updated 
requirements. 

— 40 hours in Biological Sciences required. 

— Required core courses (*denotes laboratory courses): 
BSC 161, 196*, 197*, 201*, 203, 219, 231*, 297, 302 
and 307. 

— 1 3 hours of electives are required, including two cours- 
es with laboratories. 

— Students must receive a C or better in required BSC 
core courses. 

— Required non-core courses: CHE 140, 141 and either 
CHE 220 or CHE 230/231; GEO 102 or 202; PHY 105 
or 108; MAT 120 or 145; ECO 138, or GEO 138, or 
POL 138orPSY 138. 

— BSC 202 and Biological Science courses below 182 
may not be used in the major. 

— A minimum of 12 hours in Biological Science courses 
must be completed at Illinois State University. 



Biological Sciences 147 

MINOR IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 
For Teacher Education: 

— 24 hours in Biological Sciences required including at 
least 8 hours of Botany with lab and 8 hours of Zoology 
with lab. 

— Required courses: BSC 196, 197 and 307 (2 or 3 hours, 
depending on major). 

— Electives: at least 4 hours of botany with lab and 4 hours 
of zoology with lab. At least 8 hours must be 200- or 
300-level courses. 

NOTE: In order to be certified to teach biological sciences 
in the State of Illinois, candidates must also take 8 hours of 
chemistry and/or physics. 

The Biological Sciences Minor for Teacher Education 
does not lead directly to teacher certification. Students 
seeking an additional teaching endorsement in this acade- 
mic area should contact their advisor or the Illinois State 
Board of Education Web site (www.isbe.net) for specific 
certification requirements. 



CLINICAL EXPERIENCES IN TEACHER EDUCATION 

Clinical Experiences are provided in off-campus 
clinical teaching centers, in local schools and in campus 
laboratory schools, in agencies and other approved non- 
school settings. All students will show verification of 
having completed pre-student teaching field experiences 
commensurate with attaining local, state, and national 
standards. Students must provide their own transporta- 
tion to Clinical Experience sites. 

The approximate number of clinical hours and type of 
activity associated with each course offering can be found 
with the appropriate course description. The following 
legend relates to the type and kind of activity related to a 
specific course. 

Clinical Experiences Legend 

1 . Observation 

2. Tutoring one-on-one contact 

3. Non-instruction assisting 

4. Instructional aiding a group 

5. Micro teaching 

6. Simulation lab exercises 

7. Work with clinic client 

8. Graduate practicum 

9. Professional meeting 

10. Other 

MINOR IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 
Biological Sciences Sequence: 

— 24 hours in Biological Sciences required. 

— Required courses: BSC 196 and 197. 

— At least 12 of the elective hours must be 200- or 300- 
level courses. NOTE: BSC 101 and 307 may not be 
used as electives in the minor. 



Biochemistry/ 

Molecular Biology Program 

Degrees Offered: B.S. 

This Biochemistry/Molecular Biology Program (BMB) 
is cross-listed by the Department of Chemistry and the 
School of Biological Sciences. 

HONORS IN BIOCHEMISTRY/MOLECULAR 
BIOLOGY 

Students can receive BMB Honors with additional 
course work. Additional requirements include: (1) par- 
ticipation in the University Honors Program, (2) a 
cumulative grade point of 3.30, as well as a 3.50 aver- 
age in Biochemistry/Molecular Biology courses, and (3) 
the courses: MAT 147, PHY 110 and 111, and 
CHE/BSC 299. 

MAJOR IN BIOCHEMISTRY/MOLECULAR BIOL- 
OGY PROGRAM 

General Sequence: 

— 34 hours required in Chemistry, 19 hours in Biologi- 
cal Sciences and 1 hour in Biochemistry/Molecular 
Biology Seminar. 

— Required courses: CHE 140, 141, 215, 230, 231, 
232, 233, 315, 342, 343, 344, 360 or 370, 361; BSC 
196, 197, 203, 219, 220, 350; BSC/CHE 310. 

— 1 year of calculus (MAT 145 and MAT 146) and 1 
year of Physics (PHY 108 and 109 or PHY 110 and 
111) must be completed prior to enrolling in CHE 
360, 370 or CHE 361. 

— The following courses are in the General Education pro- 
gram: BSC 196, 197; CHE 140; MAT 145; PHY 108, 1 10. 



148 Biological Sciences 

Biochemistry Sequence: 

— 34 hours required in Chemistry, 17 hours in Biological 
Sciences, and 1 hour in Biochemistry/Molecular Biolo- 
gy seminar. 

— Required courses: CHE 140, 141, 215, 230, 231, 232, 
233, 315, 342, 343, 344, 360 or 370, 361; BSC 196, 
197,203,219;CHE/BSC310. 

— 1 year of Calculus (MAT 145 and MAT 146) and 1 year 
of Physics (PHY 108 and 109 or PHY 110 and 111) 
must be completed prior to enrolling in CHE 370 or 
CHE 361. 

— The following courses are in the General Education Pro- 
gram: BSC 196, 197; CHE 140; MAT 145; PHY 108, 
110. 

3 hours of elective credit in BSC at the 200-level or 
greater. 

Molecular Biology Sequence: 

— 25 hours required in Chemistry, 23 hours in Biological 
Sciences, and 1 hour in Biochemistry/Molecular Biolo- 
gy seminar. 

— Required courses: CHE 140, 141, 215, 230, 231, 232, 
233, 342, 344; BSC 196, 197, 203, 219, 220, 260, 350; 
CHE/BSC310. 

— 1 year of Calculus (MAT 145 and 146) and 1 year of 
Physics (PHY 108 and 109 or PHY 110 and 111) must 
be completed. 

— The following courses are in the General Education Pro- 
gram: BSC 196, 197; CHE 140; MAT 145; PHY 108, 
110. 

— 6 hours of elective credit in BSC or CHE courses at the 
300-level. 

Biochemistry/Molecular Biology Course 

310 BIOCHEMISTRY/MOLECULAR 
BIOLOGY SEMINAR 
1 sem. hr. 

Introduction to scientific literature searching and techniques 
of oral and written scientific communication, focusing on 
current topics in biochemistry/molecular biology. Also 
offered as CHE 310. Prerequisites: BSC 197, BSC 203 or 
219; CHE 215, CHE 342. 



Biological Sciences Courses 

101 FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS 

IN BIOLOGY IC-NS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Learning and applying biological concepts in the areas of 
health, medicine, environment, and ethics. Not for credit 
major/minor. May not be taken under the CT/NC option. 
Lecture, recitation, and lab. Materials charge optional. 

145 HUMAN BIOLOGY OC-SMT 

3 sem. hrs. 

Study of human biology in context of science, technology, 
and culture, emphasizing technological advances in medi- 
cine, disease prevention, and public health. Not for credit 
major. Prerequisite: Inner Core. 



160 MICROBIOLOGY AND SOCIETY OC-SMT 
4 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to microorganisms, their diversity, and their 
impact on society as agents of disease, in the environment, 
and in useful applications. Lecture and lab. Not for credit 
major. Not for credit if had BSC 260. Materials charge 
optional. Prerequisite: Inner Core. 

161 INTRODUCTION TO TEACHING 
SCIENCE SEMINAR 

2 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to the nature of scientific inquiry, and research- 
based skills in science teaching and learning. Also offered as 
CHE 161. Prerequisites: Completion of one semester col- 
lege science. Teacher Education major only. 

170 GENETICS AND SOCIETY OC-SMT 

3 sem. hrs. 

Overview of human heredity in context of biology, society, 
and culture; impact on treatment of diseases, reproductive 
technology, agriculture, aging/longevity, and forensics. Not 
for credit major. Prerequisite: Inner Core. 

181 HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY AND ANATOMY I 

4 sem. hrs. 

Fundamentals of anatomy and physiology for students 
in Special Education, Health Education, Nursing, and 
Psychology. Lecture and lab. Not for credit major. Mate- 
rials charge optional. 

182 HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY AND ANATOMY H 
4 sem. hrs. 

Fundamentals of anatomy and physiology for students in 
nursing and other health related professions. Lecture and 
lab. Materials charge optional. Not for credit major. Not for 
credit if had BSC 183. Prerequisite: BSC 181. 

196 BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY IC-NSA 
4 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to structure and function of the major groups of 
microorganisms, plants, and animals, emphasizing evolu- 
tionary relationships among the major groups. Lecture and 
lab. May not be taken under the CT/NC option. Materials 
charge optional. 

197 MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR 
BASIS OF LIFE IC-NSA 

4 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to molecules, processes, and cellular organiza- 
tion of living organisms. Lecture and lab. May not be taken 
under the CT/NC option. Materials charge optional. 

201 ECOLOGY 
4 sem. hrs. 

Interactions between organisms and their environment at 
the individual, population, community, and ecosystem lev- 
els of organization. Lecture, lab, and field trips. Materials 
charge optional. Prerequisites: BSC 196 and 197. 

202 HUMAN ECOLOGY OC-SMT 
3 sem. hrs. 

Ecological principles underlying biosphere functions, human 
influence on the biosphere, application of ecological princi- 
ples to solving and avoiding environmental problems. Lec- 
ture. Not for credit major. Prerequisites: Inner Core and 
MC-QR category. 



Biological Sciences 



149 



203 CELL BIOLOGY 

3 sem. hrs. 

Structure and function of cells with emphasis on protein 
structure-function, cell morphology, and cellular signaling. 
Prerequisites: BSC 196, 197; CHE 1 10 and 1 12 or 141. 

204 BIOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS 

1 sem. hr. 

Introduction to how research is conducted, including 
designing experiments, biological literature, data analysis, 
communication of results, and impacts on society. Prereq- 
uisites: BSC 196 and 197. 

211 ECONOMIC BOTANY 

4 sem. hrs. 

Diversity, origins, and history of plant uses, concentrating 
on economically important plants of the world. Lecture and 
lab. Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: BSC 196 or 
AGR 150, and BSC 197. 

212 PRINCIPLES OF BOTANY 
4 sem. hrs. 

An integrative approach to understanding plants, including 
their physiology, structure, development, genetics, evolution 
and ecology. Lecture, lab and field trips. Materials charge 
optional. Prerequisites: BSC 196 and 197. 

219 GENETICS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Mechanisms of heredity and genetic variation, including 
gene structure and function, transmission genetics, mutation, 
and genetic analysis. Prerequisites: BSC 196 and 197. 

220 LABORATORY IN MOLECULAR 
GENETICS AND CELL BIOLOGY 

2 sem. hrs. 

Use of current molecular biology techniques to investigate 
fundamental principles of heredity and cell biology. Lec- 
ture and lab. Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: BSC 
203. BSC 219 or HSC 260 or concurrent registration. 

223 ECOLOGY AND IDENTIFICATION 
OF PLANTS 

4 sem. hrs. 

Ecology, phylogeny, and taxonomy of vascular plants. Lec- 
ture and lab. Prerequisites: BSC 196 and 197. 

231 LABORATORY METHODS IN 
TEACHING SCIENCE 
1 sem. hr. 

Introduction to laboratory-based teaching skills in science, 
intended to prepare students for inquiry-based high school 
teaching activities. Prerequisites: BSC or CHE 161. 
Teacher Education Major only. 

260 MICROBIOLOGY 
4 sem. hrs. 

Uniqueness, diversity, ecology, molecular biology, and prac- 
tical applications of microorganisms. Lecture and lab. Mate- 
rials charge optional. Prerequisites: Organic chemistry or 
concurrent registration and BSC 196 and 197 

283 ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY 
4 sem. hrs. 

The physical and chemical basis of system physiology with 
reference to invertebrates and vertebrates. Lecture and lab. 
Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: BSC 196 and 
197; BSC 203. 



286 ANIMAL BEHAVIOR 
4 sem. hrs. 

Adaptive significance of behavior and the proximate 
mechanisms underlying its expression. Emphasis is placed 
on an understanding of animal behavior within an evolu- 
tionary context. Lecture, lab and field trips. Offered every 
third semester. Prerequisites: BSC 196 and 197; BSC 201 
or concurrent registration. 

290 RESEARCH IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 
1-3 sem. hrs. 

Field and/or laboratory research in one of the biological sci- 
ences involving a participation in the scientific process with 
faculty and graduate students. Students are expected to work 
(on average) a minimum of 3 hours per week for each hour of 
credit. May be repeated; maximum of 4 hours from BSC 287, 
298.01, 290, 299, or 398 may be counted toward major 
requirements. Prerequisites: Project proposals must be 
approved by a supervising faculty member and undergraduate 
advisor prior to registration. 

292 INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY 
4 sem. hrs. 

Diversity, phylogeny, comparative anatomy and physiology 
of invertebrate animals. Lecture and lab. Materials charge 
optional. Prerequisites: BSC 196 and 197. 

293 INTRODUCTION TO 
UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH 

2 sem. hrs. 

Preparation for research in the biological sciences. Prerequi- 
sites: Completion of two of the following: BSC 201, 203, 
219; minimum 3.00 GPA; and consent of coordinator. 

294 EVOLUTION AND PHYSIOLOGY OF FISHES 

3 sem. hrs. 

The course will focus on the biology of non-tetrapod aquatic 
vertebrates and their adaptations to exploit various aquatic 
niches. Prerequisite: BSC 203 or consent instructor. 

295 COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY 

4 sem. hrs. 

Evolution and comparative anatomy of vertebrates. Lecture, 
lab, and field trip. Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: 
BSC 196 and 197. 

296 MAMMALIAN BIOLOGY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to origins, evolution, structure-function com- 
plexes, adaptive radiation, ecology, reproductive strate- 
gies, behavior and conservation biology of mammals. 
Lecture. Prerequisites: BSC 196 and 197; BSC 201 or 
concurrent registration. 

297 BIOLOGICAL EVOLUTION 
2 sem. hrs. 

Origin of life, molecular evolution, mechanisms of evolu- 
tionary change, natural selection, speciation, and contem- 
porary issues in evolutionary biology. Not for credit if had 
BSC 390. Prerequisites: BSC 201, 203, 219. 

298.01 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: CAREERS 
FOR HEALTH PREPROFESSIONALS 
1 sem. hr. 

Information and experience on careers in medicine, dentistry, 
osteopathy, podiatry, optometry, pharmacy, and veterinary 
medicine. Classroom and off-campus experience. Maximum 
4 hours from BSC 287, 290, 298.01, 299, and 398 may count 
toward major requirements. CR/NC only. Prerequisites: 
Consent pre-med advisor. 



150 



Biological Sciences 



298.02 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 
MENTORSHIP IN THE 
HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONS 
1 sem. hr. 

Work in a mentorship environment with practicing profes- 
sionals in specific areas of healthcare, including medicine, 
dentistry, optometry, and veterinary medicine. CR/NC 
only. Maximum 4 hours from BSC 287, 290, 298.01, 299, 
and 398 may count toward major requirements. Prerequi- 
sites: BSC 298.01; BSC 203 and 219 with B or better; a 
minimum 3.30 GPA and consent pre-med advisor. 

301 ENTOMOLOGY 

4 sem. hrs. 

Biology and taxonomy of insects. Lecture, lab, and field 
trips. Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: BSC 196, 
197, and 201. 

302 STUDENT TEACHING SEMINAR 

1 sem. hr. 

Student teachers reflect on their teaching through on-line 
and web-based assignments as well as development of their 
professional portfolios. Formerly BSC 389.33. Prerequi- 
site: Concurrent registration STT 399.03. 

303 SENIOR THESIS 
1 sem. hr. 

Preparation of a thesis based upon original research in the 
biological sciences. Prerequisites: BSC 201, 203, 219, 220, 
293, and minimum 3 credit hours of BSC 290 or 299; a min- 
imum 3.00 GPA and consent of Undergraduate Research 
Coordinator and faculty thesis advisor. 

304 SENIOR SEMINAR EN BIOLOGY 
1 sem. hr. 

Oral and written reports on current topics in biology. Pre- 
requisites: 2 of the following: BSC 201, 203, or 219. 

306 REGIONAL AND AREA STUDIES 
1-9 sem. hrs. 

Intensive on-site studies of organisms and their environments. 
Field work required. Prerequisite: Consent instructor. 

307 METHODS IN THE TEACHING 
OF BIOLOGY 

2-3 sem. hrs. 

Strategies, curricula, and materials applicable to teaching 
secondary school science. Includes Clinical Experiences: 40 
hours, Type 1-6. BSC Education major must register for 3 
hours; BSC Education Minor, 2 or 3 hours, depending upon 
major. Prerequisites: C&I 216 or equivalent. Admission to 
Professional Studies. 

310 BIOCHEMISTRY/MOLECULAR 
BIOLOGY SEMINAR 
1 sem. hr. 

Introduction to scientific literature searching and techniques 
of oral and written scientific communication, focusing on 
current topics in biochemistry/molecular biology. Also 
offered as CHE 310. Prerequisites: BSC 197, BSC 203 or 
219; CHE 215, 342. 



311 RAIN FOREST ECOLOGY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to the natural history and ecology of rain 
forests; intensive tropical field work and investigative learn- 
ing. Foreign travel and field work required. Formerly BSC 
306.08 REGIONAL AND AREA STUDIES: COSTA RICAN 
RAIN FOREST. Prerequisites: BSC 201 and consent 
instructor. 

325 ECOLOGICAL PHYSIOLOGY 
OF ANIMALS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Exploration of the physiological adaptations animals have 
evolved in response to habitat variation. Formerly 389.34. 
Prerequisites: BSC 201 and 203. 

329 HUMAN GENETICS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Detection, expression, transmission, and molecular manipu- 
lation of human traits; emphasis on medical genetics. Pre- 
requisites: BSC 203 and 219. 

330 PHYCOLOGY 

4 sem. hrs. 

Origin, evolution, diversity, systematics, cell biology, bio- 
chemistry, physiology, and ecology of terrestrial, freshwater, 
and marine algae. Lecture and lab. Formerly 389.29. Pre- 
requisites: BSC 201 or 203 or 219. 

333 PLANT DIVERSITY 
4 sem. hrs. 

History and diversity of plants and other green organisms 
covering major events, groups of organisms, and their phy- 
logenetic relationships. Lecture and lab. Formerly BSC 
222. Prerequisites: BSC 201 and one 200 level botany 
course or graduate standing. 

335 PLANT TAXONOMY 

3 sem. hrs. 

Classification of flowering plants; taxonomic characters and 
data, patterns of diversity, and methods of classification; dis- 
tinguishing characteristics and names of major taxa, botanical 
nomenclature, and taxonomic reference tools. Prerequisites: 
BSC 222 or 223; 1 of following: BSC 201, 203, 219; concur- 
rent registration in BSC 336. 

336 LABORATORY IN 
PLANT IDENTIFICATION 
1 sem. hr. 

Plant identification; identification tools and methods; 
descriptive morphology and terminology; field identification 
of flowering plants and major plant families; specimen col- 
lection, documentation, and curation. Prerequisites: Con- 
current registration in BSC 335. 

337 RESTORATION ECOLOGY 

4 sem. hrs. 

Basic principles of ecological restoration with a focus on 
application to Midwestern ecosystems. Lecture and lab. 
Prerequisites: BSC 201 or equivalent, or consent instructor. 

343 INTRODUCTION TO NEUROBIOLOGY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Cellular and molecular aspects of neuronal function; neuro- 
transmitter families; central nervous system development, 
anatomy and function; and neuropathology. Prerequisites: 
BSC 203 or consent instructor. 



Biological Sciences 



151 



345 INTRODUCTION TO ENDOCRINOLOGY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Cellular and molecular coordination of tissues which secrete 
chemical compounds to regulate growth, reproduction, 
metabolism, and ion homeostasis. Prerequisites: BSC 203 
or consent instructor. 

346 DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY OF ANIMALS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Molecular mechanisms and pathways which regulate tissue 
patterning and morphogenesis during early animal develop- 
ment. Prerequisites: BSC 203 or consent of instructor. BSC 
219 recommended. 

350 MOLECULAR BIOLOGY 
3 sem. hrs. 

DNA structure and replication, the Genetic Code, tran- 
scription, translation, genetic regulation, RNA splicing, 
and transposons. Prerequisites: BSC 203, 219; CHE 220, or 
230 and 231. CHE 242 or 342 recommended. 

353 BIOTECHNOLOGY LABORATORY I: 
DNA TECHNIQUES 

3 sem. hrs. 

Application and theory of molecular techniques using 
prokaryotic systems, including DNA and protein analysis, 
DNA cloning and bacterial genetics. Lecture and lab. Mate- 
rial charge optional. Not for credit if had BSC 352. Prereq- 
uisites: BSC 203, 219 and 260; CHE 220 or 230-232. CHE 
242 or 342 recommended. 

354 BIOTECHNOLOGY LABORATORY II: 
CELL BIOLOGY TECHNIQUES 

3 sem. hrs. 

Applications and theory of cell biology to study eukaryotic 
systems using biochemistry, cell culture, and immunology 
techniques. Lecture and lab. Materials charge optional. 
Prerequisites: BSC 203; CHE 220 or 230-232. CHE 242 or 
342 recommended. 

355 GENOMICS AND BIOINFORMATICS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Concepts and practice of genome sequencing and analysis, 
postgenomic applications and bioinformatics. Prerequisites: 
BSC 203, 219. 

361 MICROBIAL PATHOGENS 

4 sem. hrs. 

Pathogenesis, identification, cultivation, and classification of 
bacteria, viruses, fungi, and animal parasites associated with 
diseases of man. Lecture and lab. Materials charge optional. 
Prerequisites: BSC 203 and 260. 

362 MICROBIAL ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION 
4 sem. hrs. 

Ecological, evolutionary, and microbiological principles 
examined through the study of interactions of microbes 
with each other and with their environment. Lecture and 
lab. Materials charge optional. Prerequisite: BSC 260. 



365 BIOENERGY PLANT/MICROBE BIOLOGY 
AND THE ENVIRONMENT 

3 sem. hrs. 

The molecular, cellular, and organismal biology of microbes 
and plants as a source of alternate energy and associated 
global change. Prerequisites: BSC 201 or 203 or 219 or con- 
sent instructor. 

367 IMMUNOLOGY 

4 sem. hrs. 

Molecular, cellular, transplantation and tumor immunology; 
antimicrobial immunity; immunochemistry. Lecture and lab. 
Materials charge optional. Prerequisite: BSC 203. 

375 STREAM ECOLOGY LECTURE 

3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to the structure and function of stream ecosys- 
tems examining hydrology, geomorphology. chemistry, 
and ecology of stream ecosystems. Not for credit if had 
BSC 389.30. Prerequisites: BSC 196, 197, 201, or consent 
instructor and CHE 1 10 or equivalent. 

376 STREAM ECOLOGY LABORATORY 
1 sem. hr. 

The integration of the geology, chemistry, zoology, 
and ecology of flowing waters and their conservation 
and restoration. Not for credit if had BSC 389.30. Materials 
charge optional. Prerequisites: BSC 196, 197, 201 or con- 
sent instructor and CHE 110 or equivalent. BSC 375 or 
concurrent registration. 

383 PARASITOLOGY 

4 sem. hrs. 

Host-parasite relationships, life histories, and morphology of 
arthropod, helminth, and protozoan parasites of animals. 
Lecture and lab. Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: 
BSC 203 and 260. 

396 AVIAN BIOLOGY 
4 sem. hrs. 

Origin, evolution, diversity, systematics, biogeography, 
morphology, physiology, ecology, behavior, and conserva- 
tion biology of birds. Lecture, lab, and field trips. Materials 
charge optional. Prerequisite: BSC 201. 

398 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: BIOLOGY 
1-6 sem. hrs. 

Practical experience through employment in agencies such 
as biological research facilities, zoological or botanical gar- 
dens, game reserves, or environmental service. One credit 
per 50-60 hours work experience. CR/NC only. May be 
repeated; maximum 16 hours Professional Practice; no more 
than 4 hours from BSC 287, 290, 298.01, 299, or 398 may 
be counted toward major requirements. Prerequisites: Junior 
standing in BSC with 2.50 GPA in all natural sciences. Con- 
sent department Professional Practice advisor. 



152 Chemistry 

CHEMISTRY (CHE) 416 

214 Julian Hall, (309) 438-7661 
Web address: www.chem.ilstu.edu 

Chairperson: John Baur. 

Tenured/Tenure-track Faculty: 

Distinguished Professors: Lash. 

Professors: Baur, Ferrence, Hansen, Jones, Shaw, Standard, 

Szczepura. 

Associate Professors: Cedeno, Friesen, Hamaker, Hitchcock, 

Hunter, McLauchlan, Nagorski, Quandt. 

Assistant Professors: Kim, Mulligan, Peters, Weldon. 

General Department Information 

The Department of Chemistry is on the approved list of 
the American Chemical Society. Contact the department for 
specific certification requirements. 

HONORS IN CHEMISTRY 

Students majoring in Chemistry may be admitted to the 
Departmental Honors Program if they have (1) prior admis- 
sion to the University Honors Program, (2) completed at 
least 30 hours of college-level courses, including at least 2 
courses in Chemistry, (3) a cumulative GPA of 3.30, and 
(4) applied for admission to departmental honors to the 
Chemistry chairperson or honors advisor and received 
approval for admission into the program. 

In order to graduate with honors in Chemistry, a stu- 
dent must complete (1) all regular requirements for the 
Chemistry Major including PHY 1 10 and 1 1 1, (2) 5 hours 
of CHE 290 and/or 299, of which at least 3 hours are 
CHE 299, (3) completion of all requirements for Ameri- 
can Chemical Society degree certification; (4) MAT 147; 
ITK 165, 168, or 3 hours in non-Chemistry SMT courses 
numbered 200- or higher, (5) have at the time of gradua- 
tion a cumulative GPA of at least 3.30 and at least 3.50 in 
Chemistry courses, and (6) fulfill the general require- 
ments for participation in the University Honors Program, 
be in the University Honors Program for at least three 
semesters, and be in good standing in the University Hon- 
ors Program at the time of graduation. 

Chemistry Programs 

Degrees Offered: B.S. 
MAJOR IN CHEMISTRY 

— 39 hours required in Chemistry, including at least 31 
hours in courses numbered 200 or higher. 

— Required courses: CHE 140, 141, 215, 230, 231, 232, 
233, 315, 342, 350, 351, 360, 361, 362, 363. 

— 1 year of physics, preferably PHY 1 10 and 111, and 1 
year of calculus (through MAT 146) must be complet- 
ed prior to enrolling in CHE 360. 

— Chemistry electives: Selected from approved courses 
numbered 200 or higher. For the American Chemical 



Society Certified Degree the elective requirement is 6 
hours in Chemistry courses numbered 290 or higher. 
These courses must include 2 hours in laboratory 
course work (CHE 290, 301, 343, 398). The depart- 
ment strongly recommends presentation of work per- 
formed in 290 or 398 at a professional meeting, 
Chemistry Department Symposium or Undergraduate 
Research Symposium. The following general electives 
are highly recommended: a course in computer pro- 
gramming, a course in technical writing and other sci- 
ence courses. 

— NOTE: Students interested in careers in biochemistry, 
molecular biology, biotechnology or medicine may 
elect to follow the Biochemistry/Molecular Biology 
Degree Program (listed below). 

— A course in the major may not be taken more than 
twice unless the course description states "may be 
repeated." An exception may be requested once during 
a student's undergraduate career if the GPA in the 
major plan and the overall GPA is 2.00 or better. 

— A grade of C or better is required in all Chemistry 
courses that are prerequisites for core Chemistry cours- 
es: CHE 140, 141, 215, 230, 231, 232, 360, 361, 362. 

Teacher Certification Sequence: 

— 39 hours required in Chemistry, including at least 31 
hours in courses numbered 200 or higher, and CHE 
301 as an additional laboratory course. A Teacher Edu- 
cation student must complete the option described as 
part of the entitlement program leading to certification: 
secondary 6-12. 

MINOR IN CHEMISTRY 

— 21 hours required in Chemistry, including at least 13 
hours in courses numbered 200 or higher excluding 
CHE 204. 

— Required courses: CHE 140, 141, 215, and 220 or 
230/231. 

CLINICAL EXPERIENCES IN TEACHER EDUCA- 
TION 

Clinical Experiences are provided in off-campus clin- 
ical teaching centers, in local schools and in campus labo- 
ratory schools, in agencies and other approved non-school 
settings. All students will show verification of having 
completed pre-student teaching field experiences com- 
mensurate with attaining local, state, and national stan- 
dards. Students must provide their own transportation to 
Clinical Experience sites. 

The approximate number of clinical hours and type of 
activity associated with each course offering can be found 
with the appropriate course description. The following 
legend relates to the type and kind of activity related to a 
specific course. 

Clinical Experiences Legend 

1 . Observation 

2. Tutoring one-on-one contact 

3. Non-instruction assisting 



Instructional aiding a group 
Micro teaching 
Simulation lab exercises 
Work with clinic client 
Graduate practicum 
Professional meeting 
Other 



Biochemistry/ 

Molecular Biology Program 

Degrees Offered: B.S. 

The Biochemistry/Molecular Biology (BMB) Program 
is cross-listed by the Departments of Chemistry and Bio- 
logical Sciences. 

HONORS IN BIOCHEMISTRY/MOLECULAR 
BIOLOGY 

Students can receive BMB Honors with additional 
course work. Additional requirements include: (1) partici- 
pation in the University Honors Program, (2) a cumulative 
grade point of 3.30, as well as a 3.50 average in Biochem- 
istry/Molecular Biology, and (3) the courses: MAT 147, 
PHY 1 10 and 1 1 1, and CHE/BSC 299. 

MAJOR IN BIOCHEMISTRY/MOLECULAR 
BIOLOGY PROGRAM 



Chemistry 153 

— 3 hours of elective credit in BSC at the 200-level or 
greater. 

Molecular Biology Sequence: 

— 25 hours required in Chemistry, 23 hours in Biological 
Sciences, and 1 hour in Biochemistry/Molecular Biolo- 
gy seminar. 

— Required courses: CHE 140, 141, 215, 230, 231, 232, 
233, 342, 344; BSC 196, 197, 203, 219, 220, 260, 350; 
CHE/BSC 310. 

— 1 year of Calculus (MAT 145 and 146) and 1 year of 
Physics (PHY 108 and 109 or PHY 1 10 and 1 1 1) must 
be completed. 

— The following courses are in the General Education Pro- 
gram: BSC 196, 197; CHE 140; MAT 145; PHY 108, 1 10. 

— 6 hours of elective credit in BSC or CHE courses at the 
300-level. 

Biochemistry/Molecular Biology Course 

310 BIOCHEMISTRY/MOLECULAR 
BIOLOGY SEMINAR 
1 sem. hr. 

Introduction to scientific literature searching and techniques 
of oral and written scientific communication, focusing on 
current topics in biochemistry/molecular biology. Also 
offered as BSC 310. Prerequisites: BSC 197, BSC 203 or 
219; CHE 215, 342. 



General Sequence: 

— 34 hours required in Chemistry, 19 hours in Biological 
Sciences and 1 hour in Biochemistry/Molecular Biology 
Seminar. 

— Required courses: CHE 140, 141, 215, 230, 231, 232, 
233, 315, 342, 343, 344, 360 or 370, 361; BSC 196, 
197, 203, 219, 220, 350; BSC/CHE 310. 

— 1 year of calculus (MAT 145 and MAT 146) and 1 
year of physics (PHY 108 and 109 or PHY110 and 
111) must be completed prior to enrolling in CHE 
360/370, or CHE 361. 

— The following courses are in the General Education 
program: BSC 196, 197; CHE 140; MAT 145; PHY 
108, 110. 

Biochemistry Sequence: 

— 34 hours required in Chemistry, 17 hours in Biological 
Sciences, and 1 hour in Biochemistry/Molecular Biolo- 
gy seminar. 

— Required courses: CHE 140, 141, 215, 230, 231, 232, 
233, 315, 342, 343, 344, 360 or 370, 361; BSC 196, 
197, 203, 219; CHE/BSC 310. 

— 1 year of Calculus (MAT 145 and MAT 146) and 1 year 
of Physics (PHY 108 and 109 or PHY 110 and 111) 
must be completed prior to enrolling in CHE 360/370 or 
CHE 361. 

— The following courses are in the General Education Pro- 
gram: BSC 196, 197; CHE 140; MAT 145; PHY 108, 1 10. 



Chemistry Courses 

102 CHEMISTRY AND SOCIETY IC-NS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Selected topics from chemistry and science in general, and 
illustration of relevance of chemistry and other sciences in 
today's world. Lectures, demonstrations, recitation, and lab. 
Lecture and lab. Open only to students with no college credit 
in chemistry. May not be taken under the CT/NC option. 
Materials charge optional. 

110/112 FUNDAMENTALS OF CHEMISTRY 
AND LABORATORY IC-NSA 

4/1 sem. hrs. 

Introductory survey of fundamental concepts, laws, and 
theories of chemical science and their application to com- 
mon chemical systems. Not for credit if had CHE 141. May 
not be taken under the CT/NC option. Materials charge 
optional for CHE 112. Prerequisites: CHE 110 or concur- 
rent registration required for CHE 1 12. 



140 



IC-NSA 



GENERAL CHEMISTRY I 

4 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to stoichiometry, thermochemistry, atomic struc- 
ture, molecular structure and bonding, chemical equilibrium 
and kinetics with applications to gases, solids, liquids, and 
solutions. First half of a 2-semester sequence. Lecture and lab. 
May not be taken under the CT/NC option. Materials charge 
optional. Prerequisites: Designed primarily for students with 
high school credit in chemistry. Algebra is required. 



154 



Chemistry 



141 GENERAL CHEMISTRY II 

4 sem. hrs. 

Continuation of CHE 140. Introduction to chemical equilib- 
rium and kinetics with applications to gases, solids, liquids, 
and solutions; acid-base equilibria; electrochemistry; 
nuclear chemistry; and coordination compounds. Lecture 
and lab. Materials charge optional. Prerequisite: CHE 
140; C or better in CHE 140 required for CHE majors. 

161 INTRODUCTION TO TEACHING 
SCIENCE SEMINAR 

2 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to the nature of scientific inquiry, and research- 
based skills in science teaching and learning. Also offered as 
BSC 161. Prerequisites: Grade of B or better in CHE 110, 
CHE 140 or equivalent. Teacher Education major only. 

204 CHEMISTRY OF LIFE OC-SMT 

3 sem. hrs. 

Application of chemical principles to the understanding of 
life processes and exploration of classes of molecules 
important in everyday life. Lectures, demonstrations and 
lab. Not for credit major or minor. Prerequisites: Inner 
Core; CHE 102 or 1 year high school chemistry. BSC 101 
or equivalent recommended. 

215 FUNDAMENTALS OF 

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY 

2 sem. hrs. 

Theory and practice of selected modern analytical meth- 
ods such as volumetric, potentiometric, optical, and chro- 
matographic analysis. Lecture and lab. Materials charge 
optional. Prerequisite: CHE 141; grade of C or better in 
CHE 141 is required for CHE majors. 

220 ELEMENTARY ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

5 sem. hrs. 

One-semester survey of organic chemistry. Fundamental 
principles of structure and mechanisms of organic reactions. 
Lecture and lab. Not for credit if had CHE 230. For non- 
majors; recommended for Agriculture, Family and Con- 
sumer Sciences, Health Sciences, Nursing, and others. 
Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: CHE 1 12 or 141. 

230 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I 

3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to chemistry of aliphatic and aromatic organic 
compounds. First half of a 2-semester sequence. Not for credit 
if had CHE 220. Prerequisite: CHE 141; grade of C or better 
in CHE 141 is required for CHE majors. No credit will be 
granted in CHE 230 until credit is earned in CHE 23 1 . 

231 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY 

1 sem. hr. 

Laboratory practice illustrating preparations and reactions 
typical of functional groups. First half of a 2-semester 
sequence. Materials charge optional. Prerequisite: CHE 141; 
grade of C or better in CHE 141 is required for CHE majors. 
Concurrent registration in CHE 230. No credit will be grant- 
ed in CHE 231 until credit is earned in CHE 230. 

232 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II 
3 sem. hrs. 

Continuation of Chemistry 230, including synthetic and 
mechanistic features of organic reactions. Prerequisite: CHE 
230; C or better in CHE 230 required for CHE majors. 



233 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY II 

2 sem. hrs. 

Laboratory practice in newer techniques and methods of 
organic chemistry. Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: 
CHE 231; C or better in CHE 231 required for CHE 
majors. Concurrent registration in CHE 232. 

242 BASIC BIOCHEMISTRY 

3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to the chemistry of carbohydrates, lipids, pro- 
teins, nucleic acids and enzymes. Brief treatment of vitamins 
and intermediary metabolism. Not for credit if had CHE 
342. Prerequisite: 1 semester of organic chemistry. 

250 DESCRIPTIVE INORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

2 sem. hrs. 

Survey of wide-ranging aspects of inorganic chemistry 
including household, industrial, bioinorganic, environmental, 
geological, and nuclear chemistry. Prerequisites: CHE 220 
or 230. A grade of C or better in CHE 230 is required for 
Chemistry majors. 

280 ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY 

3 sem. hrs. 

Aquatic, soil, and atmosphere chemistry and the attendant 
problems of water, soil, and air pollution. Causes of pol- 
lutants and methods of analyzing for them. Prerequisites: 
CHE 141 with a grade of C or better, and any 200-level 
chemistry course. 

290 RESEARCH IN CHEMISTRY 
1-2 sem. hrs. 

CR/NC only. May be repeated; maximum 6 hours; only 3 
hours are applicable toward the major or minor. Prerequi- 
sites: 17 hours of Chemistry; Department form must be 
completed prior to registration. 

301 TEACHING OF CHEMISTRY 
2-3 sem. hrs. 

Modern methods and curricula of high school chemistry. 
Includes Clinical Experiences: 35 hours, Type 1-5. Prerequi- 
sites: 17 hours of Chemistry. For teaching major/minor only. 
C or better in C&I 2 1 6 or PS Y 2 1 5 or concurrent registration. 

302 STUDENT TEACHING AND 
PROFESSIONAL SEMINAR 

4 sem. hrs. 

A weekly seminar in which students exchange information 
and share reflections during and after student teaching. Pre- 
requisites: CHE 301 and STT 399.73 concurrent registra- 
tion. Chemistry Teacher Education major only. 

310 BIOCHEMISTRY/MOLECULAR 
BIOLOGY SEMINAR 
1 sem. hr. 

Introduction to scientific literature searching and techniques 
of oral and written scientific communication, focusing on 
current topics in biochemistry/molecular biology. Also 
offered as BSC 310. Prerequisites: BSC 197, BSC 203 or 
219; CHE 215; 342. 

315 INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Emphasis on modern instrumental methods of chemical analy- 
sis including electroanalytical, optical, and chromatographic 
methods. Lecture and lab. Materials charge optional. Prereq- 
uisites: CHE 215 and 362 or concurrent registration. A grade 
of C or better in CHE 215 is required for CHE majors. 



Chemistry 



155 



318 METHODS OF COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction of a wide variety of computational techniques 
and their application to problems in chemistry and physics. 
Also offered as PHY 318. Formerly CHE 288. Prerequi- 
sites: CHE 140; ITK 165; PHY 109 or 111; CHE 360 or 
PHY 220 or concurrent registration or consent instructor. 

342 GENERAL BIOCHEMISTRY I 
3 sem. hrs. 

Survey of the structure-function relationships of proteins, car- 
bohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids, dynamic equilibria, ener- 
getics, reaction kinetics/mechanisms and metabolism. Not for 
credit if had CHE 242. Prerequisites: Grade C or better in 
CHE 232 or 1 year of organic chemistry or consent instructor. 

343 BIOCHEMISTRY LABORATORY 

2 sem. hrs. 

Application of biochemical principles and methods discussed 
in Chemistry 342. Lecture and lab. Materials charge optional. 
Prerequisites: CHE 242 or 342 or concurrent registration. 

344 GENERAL BIOCHEMISTRY II 

3 sem. hrs. 

Survey of important aspects of intermediary metabolism, 
metabolic regulation, membrane transport and bioenerget- 
ics. Topics will include hormonal controls and immuno- 
chemical response. Prerequisites: Grade of B or better in 
CHE 242 or C or better in CHE 342. 

350 INORGANIC CHEMISTRY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Survey of modern inorganic chemistry including structure 
of inorganic compounds, coordination chemistry, non- 
aqueous solvents and selected inorganic reactions. Prereq- 
uisite: CHE 362; grade C or better in CHE 362 is required 
for CHE majors. 

351 INORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY 
1 sem. hr. 

Experiences in the modern techniques of synthesis and 
quantitative characterization of inorganic materials. Specif- 
ic experiments and techniques may vary but will generally 
include spectroscopic, microscopic, electrochemical, con- 
ductivity, magnetic susceptibility, thermal and vacuum line 
techniques and experiments. Materials charge optional. 
Prerequisites: CHE 350 or concurrent registration. 

360 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I 
3 sem. hrs. 

First of a series in theoretical chemistry dealing with 
descriptions of gases, liquids, solutions, thermochemistry, 
thermodynamics, chemical and phase equilibrium, kinetic 
theory, and chemical kinetics. Prerequisites: CHE 141; 
grade of C or better in CHE 141 is required for CHE 
majors; CHE 215 or concurrent registration; PHY 109 or 
1 1 1 ; 8 hours of CHE or PHY courses numbered 200 or 
higher; MAT 146. 



361 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY I 
1 sem. hr. 

Laboratory applications of principles treated in physical 
chemistry. Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: CHE 
360 or 370 or concurrent registration. 

362 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II 

3 sem. hrs. 

Continuation of CHE 360, including ionic equilibrium, 
conductance, electromotive force, spectroscopy, molecular 
theory, and miscellaneous applications of quantum theory. 
Prerequisite: CHE 360; grade of C or better in CHE 360 is 
required for Chemistry majors. 

363 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY II 
1 sem. hr. 

Laboratory studies related to principles of physical chem- 
istry with emphasis on quantum mechanics and spectroscopy. 
Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: CHE 361; 362, or 
concurrent registration. Grade of C or better in CHE 361 is 
required for Chemistry majors. 

370 PHYSICAL BIOCHEMISTRY 
3 sem. hrs. 

This course covers the principles of thermodynamics and 
kinetics, and how these principles are applied to relevant 
biochemical processes. Formerly CHE 389.02; not for credit 
if had CHE 360. Prerequisites: CHE 215, 342; PHY 109 or 
111; and MAT 146, or consent instructor. 

380 TOPICS IN CONTEMPORARY 
CHEMISTRY 

1-3 sem. hrs. 

New concepts and recent developments in the fields of 
organic, chemical education, inorganic, analytical, physi- 
cal, and biochemistry. May be repeated if content differs. 
Prerequisites: CHE 232. Certain topics may also require 
CHE 360. Grade of C or better in CHE 232 (and CHE 360 
if prerequisite) is required for Chemistry majors. 

388 CHEMISTRY OF ENERGY PRODUCTION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Advanced study of modern energy production and use. Top- 
ics covered range from methods of primary/secondary pro- 
duction to costs and sustainability. Prerequisites: CHE 141; 
MAT 146; Junior standing or consent instructor. A grade of 
C or better in CHE 141 is required for Chemistry majors. 

398 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: CHEMISTRY 
1-16 sem. hrs. 

Practical experience by employment in an industrial or 
governmental laboratory. May be repeated; maximum 1 6 
hours; no more than 4 hours/semester may be used to meet 
graduation requirements. CR/NC only. May be 2 to 5 peri- 
ods of 1 term each. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in 
CHE 232 and 233 or equivalent. Junior/senior standing. 
2.50 GPA. 



156 Communication 

COMMUNICATION (COM) 448 

434 Fell Hall, (309) 438-3671 

Web address: Communication.IUinoisState.edu 

Email address: communication@ilstu.edu 

Director: Larry W. Long. 

Tenured/Tenure-track Faculty: 

Professors: Baldwin, Comadena, Cupach, Hunt, Kang, 
Long, Metts, Moffitt, Perry, C. Simonds. 
Associate Professors: Blaney, Courtright, Glascock, Lip- 
pert, McHale, O'Sullivan, B. Simonds, Zompetti. 
Assistant Professors: Botero, Chidester, Fediuk, Huxford, 
Meyer, Moore, Smudde. 

General Information 

INTERDISCIPLINARY MINORS 

The School of Communication participates in a number 
of interdisciplinary minors at the University. Course work 
offered by the School contributes to the following minors: 
Civic Engagement and Responsibility, Cognitive Science, 
and Ethnic Studies. For further information on these minors 
and their advisors, please consult the University-Wide Cur- 
riculum section in this Undergraduate Catalog. 

HONORS IN COMMUNICATION 

The School of Communication offers students an 
opportunity to demonstrate outstanding achievement in the 
study of communication by means of participation in the 
School Honors Program. The School also offers in-course 
honors work in all its courses at the discretion of the 
instructor for students enrolled in the Honors Program. 
Qualified students are encouraged to inquire about admis- 
sion by contacting the School Honors advisor. 

Communication Studies Programs 

Degrees Offered: B.A., B.S. 

MAJOR IN COMMUNICATION STUDIES 

— 45 hours required. 

- Required courses (24 hours): COM 100 (1 hour), 111, 
123, 210, 223, 229, 272, 297, 388 or 388.01 (2 hours). 

— Students must complete one of the following sequences: 
Organizational and Leadership Communication, Interper- 
sonal, Political Communication, or Teacher Education. 

— 9 hours of electives selected from additional courses 
designated within the sequence. 

— A minimum of 24 senior hours. 

— A maximum of 9 hours can be counted concurrently 
toward the Communication Studies Major and other majors 
or minors within the School of Communication. 

— Students may include a maximum of 6 total hours of 
Professional Practice (COM 198, 398) and indepen- 
dent research (COM 296, 299) toward completion of 
the major. 



Organizational and Leadership Communication Sequence: 

Graduates from this program have secured positions in 
sales, supervision, convention/event planning, insurance, 
real estate and management. 

— 12 hours required courses: COM 227, 323, 329, 375. 

— 9 hours elective courses: COM 128, 201, 202, 218, 225, 
226, 228, 296, 299, 302, 303, 304, 318, 321, 324, 325, 
328, 331, 363, 369, 370, 371, 372, 398. 

Interpersonal Sequence: 

Graduates from this program have secured positions in 
social services, human relations, interpersonal consulting 
and corporate communication. 

— 12 hours required courses: COM 323 or 324, 325, 370, 
372. 

— 9 hours elective courses: COM 128, 201, 202, 218, 225, 
226, 227, 228, 296, 299, 302, 303, 304, 318, 321, 323, 
324, 328, 329, 331, 363, 369, 371, 375, 398; ANT/SOC 
338. 

Political Communication Sequence: 

Graduates from this program have secured positions 
in politics, persuasion consulting, media, educational sup- 
port and rhetoric. 

— 12 hours required courses: COM 201, 226, 303 or 
304,371. 

— 9 hours elective courses: COM 128, 202, 218, 225, 227, 

228, 296, 299, 302, 303, 304, 318, 321, 323, 324, 325, 
328, 329, 331, 363, 369, 370, 372, 375, 398. 

Communication Studies Education Sequence: 

— 36 hours required. Part of entitlement program leading 
to certification: secondary English Language Arts 9-12. 

— Required courses: COM 100, 111, 123, 202, 210, 223, 

229, 272, 281, 283, 297, 381, 398 (2 hours). 

— Minor in English recommended. Candidates may 
choose either the English minor or the English minor 
for teacher education. 

— Clinical Experiences are included in COM 198.02, 202, 
223, 281, 381, 398. Additional opportunities are avail- 
able through other departmental programs. 

— Students enrolled in this program are required by the State 
to complete the requirements for teaching English Lan- 
guage Arts. Students are recommended to consult an 
advisor early in their program to determine the require- 
ments for various teaching fields. 

— NOTE: Admission to Professional Studies programs 
requires a 2.50 GPA. 

MINOR IN COMMUNICATION STUDIES 

— 2 1 hours required. 

— Required course: COM 111, 297. 

— A minimum of 6 hours must be at the 300-level 
(excluding 398). 

— 1 5 hours of electives selected from: COM 1 23, 1 98.02, 20 1 , 
202, 210, 218, 223, 225, 226, 227, 228, 229, 272, 302, 303, 
304, 321, 323, 324, 325, 329, 331, 370, 371, 372, 375. 



CLINICAL EXPERIENCES IN TEACHER EDUCATION 

Clinical Experiences are provided in off-campus clin- 
ical teaching centers, in local schools and in campus labo- 
ratory schools, in agencies and other approved non-school 
settings. All students will show verification of having 
completed pre-student teaching field experiences com- 
mensurate with attaining local, state, and national stan- 
dards. Students must provide their own transportation to 
Clinical Experience sites. 

The approximate number of clinical hours and type of 
activity associated with each course offering can be found 
with the appropriate course description. The following 
legend relates to the type and kind of activity related to a 
specific course. 

Clinical Experiences Legend 



Communication 
Broadcast Journalism Sequence: 



157 



1. 


Observation 


2. 


Tutoring one-on-one contact 


3. 


Non-instruction assisting 


4. 


Instructional aiding a group 


5. 


Micro teaching 


6. 


Simulation lab exercises 


7. 


Work with clinic client 


8. 


Graduate practicum 


9. 


Professional meeting 


10 


Other 



Instructional Media Program 

MINOR IN INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA 

— 24 hours required. 

— Required courses: COM 240, 241, 365, 366; 12 hours 
selected from: ART 101, 103, 104, 109, 226; COM 160, 
162, 163, 362; TEC 210, 250, 251, 253. 



The Broadcast Journalism Sequence offers courses in 
television reporting, management and announcing. 

— Required courses: COM 167, 257, 267, 271 or 364; plus 

— Six hours of communication electives. 

News Editorial Sequence: 

The News Editorial Sequence offers courses in news 
reporting, editing and advanced news writing. 

— Required courses: COM 165, 166, 265, 385; plus 

— Six hours of communication electives. 

Visual Communication Sequence: 

The Visual Communication Sequence offers courses in 
photography, graphics, design and production for print and 
online media. 

— Required courses: COM 165 or 167, 240, 241, 269 or 
365, 366; plus 

— Three hours of communication electives. 



MINOR IN JOURNALISM 
For Teacher Education: 

— 24 hours required. 

— Required courses: COM 160, 165, 166, 265, 266, 
269, 385. 

— Electives: COM 260, 268; TEC 250. 

The Journalism for Teacher Education Minor does 
not lead directly to teacher certification. Students seeking 
an additional teaching endorsement in this academic area 
should contact their advisor or the Illinois State Board of 
Education Web site (www.isbe.net) for specific certifica- 
tion requirements. 



Journalism Program 

Degrees Offered: B.A., B.S. 

MAJOR IN JOURNALISM 

Students majoring in journalism select one of three 
sequences in addition to a core of basic courses. Core 
courses give students grounding in theory, research and legal 
and ethical issues confronting practitioners in mass media. 

— 39 hours required. 

— Required courses: COM 1 1 1, 160, 161, 320 or 360, 297, 
361,367. 

— A minimum of 24 senior hours including at least 12 
hours at the 300-level (excluding 398). 

— Journalism majors must complete a minor or second 
major in a department/school other than Communication. 

— Students may include a maximum of 3 hours of Profes- 
sional Practice 398 toward the major. 

— Sequences: Journalism majors must complete 18 hours 
in one of the following sequences: 



Mass Media Program 

Degrees Offered: B.A., B.S. 

MAJOR IN MASS MEDIA 

— 53 hours required (includes possibility of 3 core 
hours from Philosophy as part of the 53 hours). 

— Required courses: COM 101, 111, 160, 161, 297, 320 or 
360, 361, 396 and either COM 367 or one philosophy 
course from the following: PHI 232, 234, 238, 240, or 
242. 

— A minimum of 31 senior hours including at least 16 
hours at the 300-level (excluding 298 and 398). 

— A maximum of 9 hours can be counted concurrently 
toward the Mass Media major and other majors or 
minors within the School of Communication. 

— Mass Media majors must choose and complete a 
sequence in either Radio; Television Production; Media 
Management, Promotion, and Sales; or Interactive 
Media. The sequences are listed below. 



158 



Communication 



— Students may include a maximum of 3 hours of profes- 
sional practice 198.03 toward the major. 

— Students may include a maximum of 6 hours of profes- 
sional practice 398 toward the major. 

- Preapproved electives include: COM 211, 214, 228, 
240, 262, 263, 266, 267, 268, 273, 304, 314, 317, 319, 
321, 324, 352, 355, 363, 369, 370, 371, 398. 

Radio Sequence: 

- Required courses: COM 162, 214, 262, 264 or 271, 
and 364 

— 15 hours of communication electives. 

- Suggested electives: COM 163, 198.03, 240, 268, 273, 
312,314,369,398. 

Management, Promotion and Sales Sequence: 

— Required courses: COM 162, 163, 264, 273, and 364. 

— 1 5 hours of communication electives. 

— Suggested electives: COM 198.03, 214, 240, 262, 263, 
268,314,321,369,398. 

Television Production Sequence: 

- Required courses: COM 163, 263, 264, and 317, plus 
one course from either 21 1 or 362. 

— 1 5 hours of communication electives. 

- Suggested electives: COM 162, 167, 198.03, 240, 241, 
266, 270, 312, 319, 351, 362, 369, 398. 

Interactive Media Sequence: 

- Required courses: COM 163, 240, 241, 317, 319, 366 

— 12 hours of communication electives. 

— Suggested electives: COM 162, 167, 198.03, 211, 218, 
263, 266, 362, 369, 398. 

MINOR IN MASS MEDIA 

— 1 9 hours required. 

— Required courses: COM 101, 160 and 161. 

— 12 hours of electives selected in consultation with an 
academic advisor from: COM 162, 163, 165, 167, 
198.03, 211, 214, 218, 263, 264, 270, 271, 273, 296, 
297, 312, 314, 317, 319, 320, 351, 360, 361, 362, 
363, 364, 366, 367, 369, 398. 

— Students may include a maximum of 3 hours of 
198.03 or 398 toward their elective requirements. 



Public Relations Program 

Degrees Offered: B.A., B.S. 

MAJOR IN PUBLIC RELATIONS 

— 45 hours required. 

- Required courses: COM 1 1 1, 161, 165, 178, 268, 297, 377, 
378; ECO 103. 

— A minimum of 30 senior hours with at least 1 5 hours at 
the 300-level. 



18 hours of COM electives from the 200/300-level, to 
be chosen in consultation with a School of Communica- 
tion advisor. 

Students are strongly encouraged to complete at least 
one internship. 

A maximum of 3 hours of 298 and a maximum of 3 
hours of 398 may count as major electives. 



Communication Courses 

100 INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY 
OF COMMUNICATION 

1 sem. hr. 

This course acquaints students with the different areas of 
study in the communication disciplines and career options 
available to them. Prerequisite: COM major only. 

101 INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY 
OF MASS MEDIA AND JOURNALISM 

1 sem. hr. 

Acquaints students with curricular options and areas of study 
in mass media/journalism and career options available to 
them. Prerequisite: Mass Media and Journalism majors only. 

110 COMMUNICATION AS CRITICAL 
INQWRY IC 
3 sem. hrs. 

Development of communication competence, critical 
thinking, information literacy, and ethical practices in 
public speaking, small group and interpersonal contexts. 
May not be taken under the CT/NC option. Formerly COM- 
MUNICATION AND CRITICAL INQUIRY. 

111 INTRODUCTION TO 
COMMUNICATION THEORIES 
3 sem. hrs. 

Introduces the student to numerous basic communication 
theories; outlines requirements, expectations, and career 
opportunities for all communication majors. Prerequisite: 
COM major only. 

123 INTERPERSONAL 
COMMUNICATION 
3 sem. hrs. 

An introduction to 2-person interaction in a variety 
of contexts. 

128 GENDER IN THE HUMANITIES MC-LH 

3 sem. hrs. 

Examination of gender roles, norms, and stereotypes from a 
broad range of perspectives within humanities across cen- 
turies and cultures. May not be taken under the CT/NC 
option. Also offered as ENG/LAN 128. Prerequisites: ENG 
101 ; COM 1 10 or concurrent registration 

160 INTRODUCTION TO 

MASS COMMUNICATION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Mass media development and function in modern society: 
technological basis, economic and political foundations, 
social implications. 



Communication 



159 



161 MEDIA WRITING AND PRESENTATION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to the variety of mass communication media 
students may encounter in their careers. Preparation and pre- 
sentation of various mass communication formats. Prerequi- 
sites: COM 160 or 178. 

162 INTRODUCTION TO RADIO 
3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to radio industry. Development of skills needed 
to create, announce and produce radio scripts and program- 
ming. Examination of radio field. 2 hour lecture, 2 hour lab. 
Formerly RADIO PRODUCTION. Materials charge option- 
al. Prerequisite: COM 101, 160. 

163 TELEVISION PRODUCTION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Development of skills necessary in producing a television 
program. Function of television equipment and facilities. 
Evaluation of current production techniques. Producing and 
directing included. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab. Materials 
charge optional. Prerequisite: COM 101, 160. 

165 REPORTING I 
3 sem. hrs. 

Intensive training in the fundamentals of newsgathering and 
newswriting. Prerequisites: COM 160 or 178 and typing ability. 

166 COPY EDITING 
3 sem. hrs. 

Advanced training in rewriting and editing stories, 
headlines, writing, page layouts, and work on a campus 
publication. Prerequisites: COM 160 and 165. 

167 BROADCAST NEWS I 
3 sem. hrs. 

Intensive training in the fundamentals of newsgathering and 
writing for the electronic media. Materials charge optional. 
Prerequisite: COM 160. 

178 INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC RELATIONS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Examines functions of public relations in society and 
surveys concepts, theories, ethics, and principles of 
effective public relations. Prerequisites: COM 111 and 
ENG 101 recommended. 

198.02 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: FORENSICS 
1 sem. hr. 

Training and participation in speech activities. May be 
repeated; maximum 4 hours. Includes Clinical Experiences: 
15 hours, Type 1-4. 

198.03 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: MASS MEDIA 
1 sem. hr. 

Training and participation in mass media production activi- 
ties. May be repeated; maximum 3 hours. Prerequisite: Con- 
sent of instructor. 

201 COMMUNICATION AND SOCIAL ISSUES I 
3 sem. hrs. 

Criticism of communicative discourse concerning reform 
movements, religious controversy, socialism, and other topics. 
Prerequisite: COM 111. 



202 PERSUASIVE PUBLIC SPEAKING 
3 sem. hrs. 

Provides the student an opportunity to develop skills in per- 
suasive speaking in a variety of situations. Focuses on mes- 
sage content and organization appropriate for different 
situations. Includes Clinical Experiences: 2 hours, Type 1-5. 
Prerequisite: COM 111. 

210 COMMUNICATION AND CRITICAL 
THINKING 

3 sem. hrs. 

Principles of critical thinking, argumentation, negotia- 
tion, and advocacy and their expression in oral and writ- 
ten contexts. Not for credit if had COM 125. 
Prerequisite: COM 110. 

211 LIVE MULTICAMERA PRODUCTION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Development of skills for producing live multi-camera pro- 
ductions. Students learn crew positions for live events 
including pre and post production. Materials charge optional. 
May repeat with consent of instructor. Prerequisites: COM 
101,111,160,161,163. 

214 RADIO MANAGEMENT I 
3 sem. hrs. 

Refinement and practice of radio management skills through 
administering the ongoing operations of a radio station. 
Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: Radio Sequence 
major; COM 101, 160, 162 with minimum grade of C, or 
consent of instructor. 

218 COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES 
AND IMPACTS 

3 sem. hrs. 

The study of basic communication technologies (radio, tele- 
vision, satellite, computer, and electronic publishing) and 
their impact on the individual, group, organization, and soci- 
ety. Prerequisites: COM 1 1 1 or 160 or consent instructor. 

223 SMALL GROUP PROCESSES 
3 sem. hrs. 

Theory and practice in reflective group discussion methods. 
Includes Clinical Experiences: 1 hour, Type 1-3. 

225 NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Consideration of gesture, space, time, touch, objects, envi- 
ronment, voice, and eye behavior, and their relationship to 
communication and culture. Prerequisite: COM 111. 

226 CLASSICAL RHETORIC 
3 sem. hrs. 

Classical rhetoricians and rhetorics, from the early Greek 
sophists to Saint Augustine, with special attention to impact 
on modern theory construction. Prerequisite: COM 111. 

227 ORGANIZATIONAL AND 
PROFESSIONAL SPEAKING 
3 sem. hrs. 

Learning experiences in critical analysis of communication 
events, group problem solving, interviewing, technical 
speaking, and persuasive speaking. Not recommended for 
COM major. 



160 



Communication 



228 INTRODUCTION TO INTERVIEWING 
3 sem. hrs. 

Learning experiences in the selection, organization, oral pre- 
sentation of ideas through the interview situation. The course 
stresses information processing in the interview setting. 

229 FOUNDATIONS OF ORGANIZATIONAL 
COMMUNICATION 

3 sem. hrs. 

Designed to enhance students' basic communication knowl- 
edge, understanding, and skills in an organization including 
introductory concepts of organizational communication. 

240 INTRODUCTION TO VISUAL 
COMMUNICATION 

3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to the theory and practice of visual communica- 
tion including perception, visual literacy, and media design 
for multiple distribution channels. Lecture and lab. Materials 
charge optional. Formerly PRESENTATION MEDIA. Pre- 
requisites: COM 111, 160, 161. 

241 BASIC PHOTOGRAPHY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Fundamentals of photography with emphasis on design, 
production, presentation and text. Lecture and lab. Materi- 
als charge optional. 

257 BROADCAST REPORTING 
3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to concepts of news gathering for television 
and radio to enhance all aspects of experiential learning 
offered in the department. Materials charge optional. Pre- 
requisites: COM 111, 160, 167. 

262 ADVANCED RADIO APPLICATIONS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Examination of copywriting and radio production tech- 
niques. Exploration of on-air personalities and styles, 
radio station imaging, and promotions. 2 hours lecture, 2 
hours lab. Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: COM 
101,111,160,162. 

263 ADVANCED TELEVISION PRODUCTION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Creating visual appeal through the television medium. 
Aesthetics in preparing television programs. Advanced 
producing/directing techniques in commercial broadcast- 
ing and television as an art form. 2 hours lecture, 4 hours 
lab. Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: COM 101, 
111, 160, and 163. 

264 BROADCAST AND CABLE 
PROGRAMMING 

3 sem. hrs. 

Format and scheduling of programs as practiced by station, 
cable, and network management and viewed from the per- 
spective of the advertiser, the manager, the consumer, and 
the government. Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: 
COM 11 land 160. 

265 REPORTING II 
3 sem. hrs. 

Advanced training in newsgathering and newswriting 
with practical application. Prerequisites: COM 111, 160, 
and 165. 



266 ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHY 
3 sem. hrs. 

A study of the concepts, processes and techniques used to 
produce or select photographs for use in other forms of 
media. Lecture and lab. Materials charge optional. Prereq- 
uisites: COM 241 or consent of instructor. 

267 BROADCAST NEWS II 
3 sem. hrs. 

Refinement of skills in broadcast news through laboratory 
work on daily television newscasts. Materials charge option- 
al. Prerequisites: COM 111, 160, 167, or consent instructor. 

268 PUBLIC RELATIONS WRITING 
AND PRODUCTION 

3 sem. hrs. 

Public relations functions, ethics, and writing of new releases, 
newsletters, brochures, and other publications for employees 
and communities. Prerequisites: COM 111, 161. 

269 MAGAZINE PRODUCTION AND DESIGN 
3 sem. hrs. 

Training in design, production, management, and finance of 
magazine. Instruction applicable to advisement of school 
publications. Lecture and lab. Formerly SPECIALIZED 
PUBLICATIONS. Prerequisite: COM 240. 

270 DOCUMENTARY IN FILM 
AND BROADCASTING 

3 sem. hrs. 

Historical, philosophical, and theoretical consideration of 
documentary approach in films, television, and radio. 
Also offered as THE 270. 

271 BROADCAST PERFORMANCE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to basic concepts of on-air performance for 
television and radio to enhance students' experiential learn- 
ing in broadcast concentrations. Materials charge optional. 
Prerequisites: COM 111, 160, 161. 

272 FOUNDATIONS OF INTERCULTURAL 
COMMUNICATION 

3 sem. hrs. 

Basic concepts of interculrural communication, including 
value, linguistic and nonverbal differences between cul- 
tures; prejudice, ethnocentrism, stereotypes, and cultural 
adjustment. Formerly COM 289.15. Prerequisite: COM 
1 1 1 or consent instructor. 

273 MEDIA EVENT PLANNING 
AND PROMOTIONS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Study of radio, television, and sports promotions and events, 
with examination of the processes for executing them suc- 
cessfully. Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: COM 
101, 111, 160, 162, 163, or consent of instructor. 

274 ENVIRONMENTAL COMMUNICATION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Theoretical and practical exploration of environmental 
issues. Topics include corporate advocacy, grass-roots 
activism, environmental nonprofit organizations, and gov- 
ernmental influence. Prerequisite: COM 111. 



Communication 



161 



275 SELECTED TOPICS IN PUBLIC RELATIONS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Examination of various genres of public relations and repre- 
sentative case studies in public relations. May be repeated if 
content different. Prerequisite: COM 111. 

281 PRINCIPLES OF SPEECH EDUCATION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Methods and materials for teaching secondary speech com- 
munication. Planning and applying strategies, methods of 
measurement, classroom criticism of performance, selection 
and compilation of materials. Includes Clinical Experiences: 
10 hours, Type 1-6, 9. Prerequisites: C or better in C&I 212, 
214, 216, and PSY 215 (6 hours) or concurrent registration. 
Admission to Professional Studies. 

283 COMMUNICATION IN THE CLASSROOM 
3 sem. hrs. 

Theory and practice in developing communication compe- 
tencies in an academic setting. Preparation and presentation 
of various instructional strategies for diverse audiences. Pre- 
requisites: C or better in COM 110; 45 hours, and declared 
Teacher Education Major. 

296 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH 
IN COMMUNICATION 

3 sem. hrs. 

Prerequisites: Project approval by department chair and 
instructor prior to registration. 

297 COMMUNICATION RESEARCH METHODS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Methods of scholarly research and critical evaluation of 
research. Prerequisite: COM 111. 

298.01 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 
PUBLIC RELATIONS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Training and participation public relations management 
and campaign activities. Emphasis: professional activities 
and competition opportunities at local, national levels. Pre- 
requisite: COM 111. 

303 CONTROVERSY AND 
CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Contemporary communication on current significant, contro- 
versial issues. Prerequisite: COM 111. 

304 FREEDOM OF SPEECH AND PRESS 
3 sem. hrs. 

First Amendment rights. Emphasis on Supreme Court deci- 
sions relating to political dissent, obscenity, provocation and 
demonstration, and press freedom. Prerequisite: COM 111. 

312 BROADCAST HISTORY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Course explores in depth the origins of broadcast media 
including people, industries, technologies, and government 
policies influencing media. Prerequisite: COM 160. 

314 TOPICS IN RADIO MANAGEMENT 
3 sem. hrs. 

Specialized management training in radio station operations. 
Development of long range planning, problem solving, and 
leadership skills. Materials charge optional. May be repeated 
for credit if content differs. Prerequisites: COM 101, 111, 
160, 162, 214 and consent of instructor. 



317 DIGITAL POST PRODUCTION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Theory, aesthetics, and technical skills required for profes- 
sional level non-linear film/video editing. Materials charge 
optional. Prerequisites: COM 101, 160, 161, 163. 

318 SOCIAL DYNAMICS OF 
COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES 
3 sem. hrs. 

Examination of social dynamics of mediated communication 
emphasizing implications of new communication technolo- 
gies for social institutions and social change. Prerequisites: 
COM 2 1 8 or consent instructor. 

319 INTERACTIVE MEDIA DESIGN 
AND AUTHORING 

3 sem. hrs. 

Designing and authoring interactive media for on-line and 
packaged distribution. Students produce digital portfolios of 
media projects from their academic career. Lecture. Materials 
charge optional. Prerequisites: COM 111, 160, 161, 163, 317. 

320 MASS MEDIA: CULTURAL 
CRITICISM AND PROBLEMS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Critiquing mass media's influence on cultural and economic 
life and its influence on public policy and social change. For- 
merly COM 260 MASS COMMUNICATION: CULTURAL 
CRITICISM AND PROBLEMS. Prerequisites: COM 101, 
111 and 160. 

321 CAMPAIGN COMMUNICATION 
AND MESSAGE DESIGN 

3 sem. hrs. 

Application of theory and research to campaign strategy 
and message design. Emphasis: ethical, informative, and 
persuasive messages in commercial, political, and social 
issue campaigns. Prerequisite: COM 111. 

323 THEORY AND RESEARCH IN 
SMALL GROUP COMMUNICATION 

3 sem. hrs. 

Theoretical and experimental literature dealing with small 
group communication processes. Prerequisites: COM 1 1 1 
and 297. 

324 THEORY AND RESEARCH IN PERSUASION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Survey of contemporary theoretical and empirical litera- 
ture dealing with the question of how an individual's atti- 
tudes, beliefs, and social behaviors are affected by 
communication. Prerequisites: COM 1 1 1 and 297. 

325 THEORY AND RESEARCH IN 
INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Interpersonal communication and research and its implica- 
tions for developing, maintaining, and terminating relation- 
ships. Focus on developing communicative competence. 
Prerequisites: COM 1 1 1 and 297. 

328 NEGOTIATION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Overview of theory and practice of negotiation. Experience 
in applying strategies to negotiate effectively and ethically. 
Formerly 389.57. Prerequisites: COM 1 1 1 and 297, or con- 
sent of instructor. 



162 



Communication 



329 ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Theoretical and experimental literature dealing with com- 
munication in an organizational setting. Prerequisite: 
COM 111. 

331 HUMAN COMMUNICATION 
AND THE AGING PROCESS 
3 sem. hrs. 

An examination of the particular communication needs of 
the aging and current research in the field. Prerequisites: 
COM 111 or SOC 211. 

351 ADVANCED WRITING FOR MASS MEDIA 
3 sem. hrs. 

This course focuses on writing for long form mass media 
including documentaries, features, dramas, and comedies. 
Prerequisites: COM 160 and 161. 

352 DOCUMENTARY PRODUCTION ON 
SOCIAL AND POLITICAL ISSUES 

3 sem. hrs. 

Social and political documentary video production with an 
overview of the history and trends in documentary. Formerly 
COM 389.58. Prerequisites: COM 161, 163, 263. 

355 INTERNATIONAL PUBLIC RELATIONS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Theory and research related to the practice of public rela- 
tions across cultural and national boundaries. Application of 
theory to practical problems. Prerequisites: COM 1 1 1 and 
1 78 or consent instructor. 

356 EXECUTIVE SPEECHWRITING 
3 sem. hrs. 

Principles and process for researching and ghostwriting 
speeches. Includes strategies for public-speaking opportuni- 
ties and counseling speakers. Formerly COM 275.01. Pre- 
requisites: COM 1 1 1, or consent of instructor. 

358 CRISIS COMMUNICATION 
3 sem. hrs. 

An advanced examination of the use of communication in 
planning, managing and responding to organization crises. 
Prerequisites: COM 178 and 268. 

360 MASS COMMUNICATION: 
THEORY AND EFFECTS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Critical examination of channel and receiver variables and 
their effects on the act of moving information through a given 
medium. Students participate in at least one research project 
of their design. Prerequisites: COM 1 1 1, 160, and 260. 

361 MASS MEDIA LAW, POLICY AND ETHICS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Examines statutes, policy, and case law affecting media 
operations along with ethical guidelines for practitioners and 
industry self-regulation guidelines. Formerly REGULA- 
TION OF THE COMMUNICATION INDUSTRY. Pre- 
requisites: COM 111,160,297. 

362 NON-BROADCAST TELEVISION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Theory and practice of non-broadcast television with empha- 
sis on equipment, production processes and effectiveness as a 
medium of communication for business, education and medi- 
cine. Lecture and lab. Prerequisite: COM 111. 



364 BROADCAST MANAGEMENT 
3 sem. hrs. 

Role and functions of broadcast media managers in society. 
Prerequisites: COM 1 1 1 and 160. COM 264 recommended. 

365 NEWSPAPER DESIGN AND GRAPHICS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Fundamentals of newspaper layout, design and graphics. 
Lecture and lab. Formerly GRAPHIC COMMUNICATION I. 
Prerequisite: COM 240. 

366 WEB PRODUCTION AND DESIGN 
3 sem. hrs. 

Design fundamentals and technical skills for Web page pro- 
duction. Lecture and lab. Formerly GRAPHIC COMMUNI- 
CATION II. Prerequisite: COM 240. 

367 ETHICAL PROBLEMS IN 
MASS COMMUNICATION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Analysis of ethical problems in news, entertainment, and 
persuasive media. Students develop analytical skills 
using cases and research projects. Prerequisite: COM 
111, 160,297. 

369 INTERNATIONAL COMMUNICATION 
SYSTEMS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Mass communication systems employed in foreign coun- 
tries, their roles in national and international social and cul- 
tural development. Prerequisite: COM 111. 

370 PSYCHOLOGY OF LANGUAGE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Theories and experimental research relating to the develop- 
ment and function of language. Prerequisites: COM 1 1 1 
and 297. 

371 POLITICAL COMMUNICATION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Basic theory and research relating to political campaign 
communication. Special attention is paid to the persua- 
sive process of political campaigning focusing upon the 
role of the media, the candidate, image creation and 
other selected topics on political campaign communica- 
tion. Prerequisites: COM 1 1 1; 6 hours COM or 6 hours 
POL recommended. 

372 THEORY AND RESEARCH 
IN INTERCULTURAL 
COMMUNICATION 

3 sem. hrs. 

Theories and research relating to face-to-face communica- 
tion among people from different cultural, national, ethnic, 
or racial backgrounds. Formerly INTERCULTURAL COM- 
MUNICATION. Prerequisites: COM 111, 272 and 297, or 
consent instructor. 

375 COMMUNICATION AND LEADERSHIP 
3 sem. hrs. 

Survey of theory and research dealing with how the different 
approaches to leadership are enacted through the process of 
communication. Not for credit if had 389.56, LEADERSHIP 
AND COMMUNICATION. Prerequisite: COM 111, 297. 



Communication; Communication Sciences and Disorders 



163 



377 PUBLIC RELATIONS MANAGEMENT: 
CAMPAIGNS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Theory and research related to professional experience in 
strategizing and executing public relations. Prerequisites: 
COM 1 1 1, 161, 165, 268, 297; and ECO 103. 

378 PUBLIC RELATIONS MANAGEMENT: 
CORPORATE COMMUNICATION 

3 sem. hrs. 

As the "senior capstone course" focus is on the corporate 
relations function of public relations. Formerly PUBLIC 
RELA TIONS MAN A GEMENT. Prerequisites : COM 111, 
161, 165, 268, 297; and ECO 103. 



398 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: COMMUNICATION 
1-12 sem. hrs. 

Arranged on-campus practical experience under the guid- 
ance of department academic supervisors. Includes Clinical 
Experiences: 55 hours, Type 1-9. Maximum 3-6 hours Pro- 
fessional Practice applicable to major; 16 hours applicable 
to graduation. Materials charge optional. Prerequisite: 
Complete school application prior to registration. 

398.01 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: ON-CAMPUS 
INTERNSHIP IN COMMUNICATION 

398.02 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: OFF-CAMPUS 
INTERNSHIP IN COMMUNICATION 



381 PROBLEMS IN THE TEACHING 
OF COMMUNICATION 

3 sem. hrs. 

Identification of common and unique problems in teaching 
communication concepts and skills. Approaches to resolving 
classroom problems. Prerequisites: COM 28 1 . C or better in 
C&I 212, 214, 216; and PSY 215 (6 hours) or concurrent 
registration. 

385 EDITORIAL AND FEATURE WRITING 
3 sem. hrs. 

Advanced training in writing feature articles and editorials 
for newspapers and magazines. Prerequisites: COM 111, 
165, and 265. 

388 SENIOR CAPSTONE: 

COMMUNICATION STUDIES 
2 sem. hrs. 

Students will synthesize course work and communication 
experiences into transferable theory, skills, and applications 
via a senior project and portfolio. Prerequisites: Major or 
minor in Communication Studies; senior standing (90 hours 
completed); minimum of 24 hours completed within the 
major field of study. COM 100, 111, 297. 

388.01 SENIOR CAPSTONE: 

COMMUNICATION STUDIES (PEP) 

2 sem. hrs. 

Students will synthesize course work and communication 
experiences into transferable theory, skills, and applications 
via a senior project and portfolio that focuses on practical 
application in civic contexts. Prerequisites: Major or minor 
in Communication Studies; senior standing (90 hours com- 
pleted); minimum of 24 hours completed within the major 
field of study. COM 100, 1 1 1, 297. 

392 TOPICS IN COMMUNICATION INSTRUCTION 
1 sem. hr. 

Identification and development of new instructional content, 
approaches, strategies, and materials for selected oral com- 
munication concepts in educational and business classrooms. 

396 CAPSTONE IN MASS MEDIA 
1 sem. hr. 

A culminating capstone experience for Mass Media majors, 
producing a professional portfolio and defending the knowl- 
edge and skills acquired. Prerequisites: Must be taken either 
in the student's last semester of planned coursework before 
graduation or after completion of a minimum of 48 hours in 
the major including: COM 101, 111, 160, 161, 297, 320 or 
360, 361, and 367. 



COMMUNICATION SCIENCES 
AND DISORDERS (CSD) 472 

204 Fairchild Hall, (309) 438-8643 
Web address: CSD.IIlinoisState.edu 
Email address: hrfritz@ilstu.edu 

Chairperson: Joseph Smaldino. 
Tenured/Tenure-track Faculty: 

Professors: Beck, Smaldino. 

Associate Professors: Bailey, A. Bowman, Harbers. 
Assistant Professors: Bondurant, Friberg, Kim, Kimball, 
Perry, Sawyer. 

General Department Information 

MINOR IN COGNITIVE SCIENCE 

The Department of Communication Sciences and Disor- 
ders participates in the degree program for the Minor in Cog- 
nitive Science. Several courses offered by the Department 
contribute to the minor. For further information, please con- 
sult the Department advisor as well as the section entitled 
"Minor in Cognitive Science" under University-Wide Cur- 
riculum in this Undergraduate Catalog. 

HONORS IN SPEECH PATHOLOGY AND 
AUDIOLOGY 

Honors work in communicative disorders and speech 
and hearing science is available to qualified students. In 
order to successfully complete the Departmental Honors 
Program, candidates must fulfill the general requirements for 
participation in the University Honors Program, and: 

— complete all requirements for the major, earning no 
grade lower than B in Communication Sciences and 
Disorders (CSD) courses, and maintain a 3.50 GPA 
in CSD courses; 

— complete a minimum of 6 semester hours of in-course 
honors work in 300-level CSD courses; 

— complete an Honors Project (CSD 299) or Honors 
Thesis (IDS 395) for 3 semester hours. 

Interested students should contact the undergraduate 
departmental advisor for additional details and admis- 
sion procedures. 



164 Communication Sciences and Disorders 



Speech Pathology and 
Audiology Programs 

Degree Offered: B.S. 

Program Admission Requirements for New and 
Continuing Students: 

Admission to this academic program is limited and is 
based on space availability and the competitiveness of the 
applicant pool. Factors that may be considered include, but 
are not limited to: courses completed, cumulative GPA, 
hours completed, personal interview or written statement, 
and samples of work completed. For additional information 
on minimum requirements for admission and the application 
and selection process, visit www.FindYourMajor.ilstu.edu or 
contact the undergraduate advisor for the intended major. 

Standards for Progress in the Major: 

In order to remain in the major, students must attain a 
3.00 GPA in the following 3 courses: CSD 155, CSD 175 
and CSD 310. An average grade below 3.00 in these courses 
will result in the student being dropped from the Speech 
Pathology and Audiology major. Any student who falls into 
this category will be advised of this during a meeting with 
the department advisor and will be advised that to be re- 
enrolled into the Speech Pathology and Audiology major, 
students will need to re-enroll in the above three courses 
until a B average is achieved. 

MAJOR IN SPEECH PATHOLOGY AND AUDIOLOGY 
Speech Pathology Sequence: 

— 45 hours in Communication Sciences and Disorders 
required. 

— Required courses: CSD 155, 175, 215, 310, 316, 318, 
319, 321, 332, 349, 350, 351, 352, 360. 

— Professional Education requirements: C&I 210 or PSY 
213;SED101. 

This is a pre-professional program designed to prepare 
students for practice in any setting. A master's degree in 
this field is needed to obtain the Type 73 School Services 
Personnel Certificate endorsed in Speech-Language Pathol- 
ogy, the Illinois License in Speech-Language Pathology, 
and the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association's 
Certificate of Clinical Competence. Copies of requirements 
for all of these credentials are available in the Department 
office. Clinical Experiences are obtained at the undergradu- 
ate and graduate levels. 

CLINICAL EXPERIENCES 

Clinical Experiences are provided at the Eckelmann-Tay- 
lor Speech and Hearing Clinic, in off-campus clinical teach- 
ing centers, in local schools, in campus laboratory schools, 
university classes, agencies and other approved non-school 
settings. In accordance with the American Speech Language 
Hearing Association, students must obtain a minimum of 25 
clock hours of observation before beginning any clinical 



practicum experiences. These clinical experience observation 
hours are acquired in various undergraduate courses. 

Audiology Sequence: 

— 39 hours required. NOTE: Because of prerequisites or 
lack of prior skill, this major may require more hours 
than indicated. 

— Required Communication Sciences and Disorders 
courses: CSD 115, 155, 175, 215, 310, 318, 321, 
332,349,350,351,352. 

This is a preprofessional program designed to prepare 
students for graduate study in Audiology. Upon completion 
of the master's degree, the student will have completed the 
academic and clinical requirements for the American 
Speech-Language-Hearing Association's Certificate of Clin- 
ical Competence in Audiology. All Clinical Experiences are 
obtained at the undergraduate and graduate levels. 

MINOR IN SPEECH PATHOLOGY AND AUDIOLOGY 

— 2 1 hours required. 

— Required courses: CSD 155, 175, 215, 310. Electives 
cannot include practicum courses. 

— NOTE: Students taking this minor will not qualify in 
this area for Illinois or American Speech-Language- 
Hearing Association certification. 

Assessment: 

Majors in Speech Pathology and Audiology are expected 
to participate in the assessment process as one of the require- 
ments for an undergraduate degree in this Department. 

Communication Sciences and 
Disorders Courses 

115 HUMAN VERBAL DEVELOPMENT 

3 sem. hrs. 

The study of human communication, including the anatomy and 
physiology of speech and hearing, with an emphasis on speech 
and language development in children and the role of caregivers 
in the acquisition process. Includes Clinical Experiences. 

155 ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF THE 
SPEECH AND HEARING MECHANISM 

4 sem. hrs. 

Anatomic and physiologic foundation of the speech and hear- 
ing mechanism. Current physiologic theory applied to etiolo- 
gy of speech and hearing disorders. 

175 SPEECH AND LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT 
3 sem. hrs. 

Comprehensive study of acquisition of speech and language 
by children. Emphasis on first 6 years. Includes Clinical 
Experiences: 5 hours, Type 1 . 

211 PHONETICS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Sound system of American speech. Standard and non-stan- 
dard variations. Articulatory and acoustic considerations. 
Practice in transcribing and reading phonetic symbols. 
Includes Clinical Experiences: 5 hours, Type 1 . Not for cred- 
it if had PAS 215. 



Communication Sciences and Disorders; Economics 



165 



215 CLINICAL PHONETICS 
4 sem. hrs. 

Clinical application of the sound system of English. 
Phonological development. Characteristics and etiologies 
of articulation and phonological disorders. Includes Clini- 
cal Experiences: 4 hours, Type I. Not for credit if had PAS 
211,315. Prerequisite: CSD 155. 

310 CLINICAL NEUROLOGY 
4 sem. hrs. 

Study of neuroanatomy and physiology related to speech, 
language, and cognition. Aphasia, traumatic brain injury 
and right hemisphere disorder introduced. Formerly NEU- 
ROBASIS OF SPEECH, LANGUAGE, HEARING. 

316 INTRODUCTION TO ORGANIC 
DISORDERS OF SPEECH 
3 sem. hrs. 

Speech disorders related to respiratory-laryngeal and articu- 
latory-resonance systems and includes both diagnostic and 
remedial procedures for these disorders. Includes Clinical 
Experiences: 5 hours, Type 1. Prerequisite: CSD 310. 

318 PROFESSIONAL ISSUES IN SPEECH 
LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY AND AUDIOLOGY 

3 sem. hrs. 

Professional attitudes, ethics, and organizations. Responsi- 
bilities in various professional settings. Program develop- 
ment and maintenance. 

319 FOUNDATIONS OF SPEECH DISORDERS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Etiology, characteristics, and development of stuttering 
and motor speech disorders. Introduction to intervention 
strategies. Includes Clinical Experiences: 2 hours, Type 1. 
Formerly STUTTERING I. Prerequisite: CSD 310. 

321 INTRODUCTION TO 

LANGUAGE DISORDERS 

4 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to the identification and remediation of lan- 
guage disorders in children and adolescents. Includes lan- 
guage analysis lab experiences. Includes Clinical 
Experiences: 5 hours, Type 1. Formerly LANGUAGE 
PATHOLOGY. Prerequisite: CSD 175. 

332 THE CLINICAL PROCESS: 

EVALUATION AND TREATMENT 

4 sem. hrs. 

Clinical principles and procedures for differential diagnosis 
and evaluation of communication disorders. Introduction to 
clinical techniques and management. Includes Clinical 
Experiences: 20 hours, Type 1 . Not for credit if had PAS 
330, 331. Prerequisites: CSD 321. Major only. 

349 SPEECH AND HEARING SCIENCE 

3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to concepts, theories, and terminology required 
for an understanding of speech reception, auditory process- 
ing and speech production. Formerly HEARING SCIENCE. 
Prerequisites: CSD 155 or consent instructor. 

350 INTRODUCTION TO AUDIOLOGY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Principles of hearing measurement: sound, human ear, 
test methods, hearing losses, screening methods, test 
interpretation. Includes Clinical Experiences: 4 hours, 
Type 1. Prerequisite: CSD 349. 



351 INTRODUCTION TO AURAL 
REHABILITATION TRAINING 
3 sem. hrs. 

Principles of habilitation/rehabilitation of communication 
disorders related to hearing impairment. Visual/auditory 
speech signals. Amplification: function/use. Includes Clini- 
cal Experiences: 4 hours, Type 1. Prerequisites: CSD 350. 

352 SIGNED ENGLISH FOR CLINICIANS 
1 sem. hr. 

Introduction to Signed English for those who will provide 
therapy to children who are deaf or hard of hearing. Pre- 
requisites: Major only, senior standing. 

360 AUGMENTATIVE COMMUNICATION 
FOR NON-SPEAKING PERSONS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to assessment, intervention strategies, tech- 
nology and empirical research relative to non-speaking 
individuals. Includes Clinical Experiences: 5 hours, Type 1. 
Prerequisite: CSD 321. 

370 WRITTEN LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT 
3 sem. hrs. 

The linguistic knowledge and processes that form the basis 
of written language skills will be emphasized. Prerequi- 
sites: CSD 175, senior standing , or consent of instructor. 

375 CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN 

COMMUNICATION DISORDERS 
3 sem. hrs. 

A multicultural perspective of communication disorders 
across the lifespan in order to provide culturally appropriate 
assessment and intervention. Prerequisite: Senior standing. 



ECONOMICS (ECO) 

425 Stevenson Hall, (309) 438-8625 

Web address: Economics.IllinoisState.edu 



420 



Chairperson: Neil Skaggs. 
Tenured/Tenure-track Faculty: 

Distinguished Professor: Ram. 

Professors: Goel, Mohammadi, Payne, Rich, Skaggs. 

Associate Professors: Billger, Carlson, Loomis, Waters, 

Zhang. 

Assistant Professors: Chen, Chupp, Dincer, Ohler, 

Schwalm. 

General Department Information 

Undergraduate Program Director: J. Lon Carlson 
Office: Stevenson Hall 439-A 

Academic Requirements: 

Majoring in Economics helps you develop important 
skills, including critical thinking and analytical reasoning. 
These general skills are valuable for any job or occupa- 
tion. Thus, a degree in Economics provides you with the 
flexibility to adapt in a changing environment and take 
advantage of new opportunities. This flexibility is impor- 
tant because, if you are typical, you will change jobs or 
occupations about six times in your lifetime. 

One of the main advantages of an Economics degree is 
the wide range of careers that are available to graduates. 



166 



Economics 



Economics majors find jobs in a variety of settings, includ- 
ing private industry; federal, state, and local government; 
international organizations and education. Over the past 
several years, graduates of the Economics program at Illi- 
nois State University have pursued a variety of careers, 
including positions in entry-level business/management, 
sales, data processing, staff analysis and research, and 
teaching. An undergraduate degree in economics is also 
excellent preparation for students who plan to pursue grad- 
uate-level studies in economics, business, and law. 

Besides providing flexibility in the job market, the 
Economics major provides you with flexibility in your aca- 
demic career. Only 33 hours are required for the major and 
only 18 hours are required for the minor. Specific course 
requirements for the major and the minor are indicated 
below. The low number of hours required for the Economics 
major or minor gives you the flexibility to combine it with a 
major or minor in other disciplines to design your academic 
program to fit your life goals. 

INTERDISCIPLINARY MINORS 

The Department of Economics participates in interdiscipli- 
nary minors at the University. Course work offered by the 
Department contributes to the Minor in Urban Studies. For fur- 
ther information, please consult the section entitled "Universi- 
ty-Wide Curriculum" in this Undergraduate Catalog. 

HONORS IN ECONOMICS 

Candidates for honors must fulfill the general require- 
ments for participation in the University Honors Program 
and must be Economics majors with a GPA of 3.30 overall 
and 3.75 or higher in Economics courses. Students will be 
expected to complete 6 hours of coursework designated as 
honors coursework within the Department of Economics. 
These could include ECO 1 05 honors, or 2 in-course honors 
at the 200- or 300-level. In-course honors requires individual 
negotiation with the faculty member teaching the course. In 
addition, the achievement of honors requires the writing of a 
substantial original paper. The student will enroll in Inde- 
pendent Honors Study and will receive help from an 
assigned faculty member. At the end of the semester the stu- 
dent will make an oral presentation of the paper. One copy 
of the original paper will be kept in the Department office 
and be available for inspection. Honors credit will show on 
the official transcript and will be stated on the diploma. 

Economics Programs 

Degrees Offered: B.A., B.S. 

Admission Requirements: 

Students will be admitted into the Economics depart- 
ment's programs from a pool of qualified applicants on the 
basis of individual qualifications. Students are admitted to 
the major or minor in Economics on a competitive and selec- 
tive basis. The number of students admitted may vary from 
year to year depending on program capacity and qualifica- 
tions of students in the pool. The Department of Economics 
reserves the right to maintain a balanced enrollment. For 
more information on admission to the Economics major go 
to www.econ.ilstu.edu/undergrad/curriculum.htm. 



MAJOR IN ECONOMICS 

General Economics Sequence: 

— A minimum of 33 hours required. 

— Required courses: ECO 105, 138, 238, 240, 241, 300 (to 
be taken concurrently with one 3-hour 300-level ECO 
course); MAT 121 or 145. (either ECO 148, GEO 138, 
MQM 100, POL 138, or PSY 138 may be substituted 
for ECO 138.) 

— A grade of C or better must be earned in ECO 105, 138 
(or approved substitute), 238, 240, 241, 300 and MAT 
121 or 145. 

— 3 elective Economics courses at the 200- or 300-level 
are required in addition to the required 3 -hour 300-level 
course. 

— A minimum of 1 5 senior hours in Economics courses must 
be completed at Illinois State University. The Department 
Chairperson may grant exemptions to students whose 
cumulative GPA is 3.00 or higher. 

Concentrations in the General Economics Sequence: 

The General Economics Sequence is an excellent com- 
plement to a variety of other majors or customized sets of 
courses. Majors completing the General Economics 
Sequence may elect (but are not required to elect) one of 
the following concentrations. Although no specific courses 
are required for these concentrations, recommended cours- 
es for each are listed below: 

1. Electricity, Natural Gas, and Telecommunications 
Economics: Economics electives: ECO 235, 236, 239, 
320, and 335 plus ACC 131 and 132; ENG 249; and FIL 
240, 242 and 347. 

2. Graduate School Preparation: ENG 249; and MAT 
146, 147, 175, 350 and 356. 

3. Human Resources: Economics electives: ECO 225, 
326, and 339 plus ENG 249; FIL 313; MQM 323 and 
324; and PSY 230. 

4. International Economics: Economic electives: ECO 
245, 345 and 346 plus ENG 249; INB 190; MQM 350; 
POL 1 5 1 and proficiency in a foreign language. 

5. Pre-Law: Economic electives: ECO 220, 235, 320 and 
335 plus COM 202; ENG 249; FIL 185 and 209; and 
POL 215 and 318. 

6. Public Policy: Economic electives: ECO 236, 255, 329, 
340, 350, plus ENG 249; FIL 311; and POL 232, 312 
and 318. 

Managerial Economics Sequence 

The Managerial Economics Sequence is designed for 
students who desire a more focused degree in Economics 
that combines the core skills in the discipline with a funda- 
mental understanding of basic business tools including 
accounting, finance, and data management. 

— A minimum of 48 hours required. 

— Required courses: ECO 105, 138 (or approved sub- 
stitute), 215, 238, 239, 240, 241, 245, 300 (to be 
taken concurrently with one 3-hour 300-level ECO 
course from the following: ECO 320, 326, 335, 339, 
345, 346); ACC 131, 132; ITK 150, 208; FIL 240; 
MAT 121 or 145. 



Economics 



167 



— A grade of C or better must be earned in each of the 
required courses. 

— A minimum 2.50 GPA in the required courses in the 
sequence. 

— A minimum of 15 senior hours in Economics courses 
must be completed at Illinois State University. The 
Department Chairperson may grant exemptions to stu- 
dents whose cumulative GPA is 3.00 or higher. 

MINOR IN ECONOMICS 

— 1 8 hours in Economics required. 

— Required course: ECO 105. 

— MAT 121 or 145 may be, but are not required to be, 
used for 4 hours of credit toward the minor. 

— ECO 103 may not be counted toward the minor. 

MINOR IN ECONOMICS 

For Teacher Education: 

— Program requirements are the same as those for the 
Minor in Economics. 

The Minor in Economics for Teacher Education does 
not lead directly to teacher certification. Students seeking 
an additional teaching endorsement in this academic area 
should contact their advisor or the Illinois State Board of 
Education Web site (www.isbe.net) for specific certifica- 
tion requirements. 

Economics Courses 

103 INDIVIDUAL AND SOCIAL CHOICE MC-IS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Economic impacts of individual and social choices and 
their influence on social issues. Includes perspectives 
from other social sciences. May not be taken under the 
CT/NC option. Prerequisites: ENG 101 or COM 110 or 
concurrent registration. 

105 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS 

4 sem. hrs. 

Supply and demand in product and resource markets, 
international trade, determination of GDP, employment, 
inflation and economic growth. Not for credit if had ECO 
101 and 102. 

138 ECONOMIC REASONING USING 

STATISTICS MC-QR 

3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics with 
applications in economics. Includes the use of statistical soft- 
ware package on laboratory computers. May not be taken 
under CT/NC option. Formerly SOCIAL SCIENCE REA- 
SONING USING STATISTICS Not for credit if had GEO 
138, POL 138, PSY 138 or MQM 100. Prerequisites: MAT 
120, 130, or 145. 

202 CURRENT ECONOMIC ISSUES 
3 sem. hrs. 

Application of introductory principles to world econom- 
ic problems, such as energy, pollution, poverty and 
unemployment. Prerequisites: ECO 101 and 102, or 105. 



205 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND GROWTH 

3 sem. hrs. 

Historical and current determinants of economic develop- 
ment. Problems associated with generating and accelerating 
economic growth in less developed countries. Formerly 
DEVELOPMENT ECONOMICS Prerequisites: ECO 105. 

210 COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Comparative analysis of several types of economic sys- 
tems. Discussion of alternative models of economic deci- 
sion-making. Case studies of such economies as China, 
Japan, South Africa, Sweden, Russia, and Yugoslavia. 
Prerequisites: ECO 101 and 102, or 105. 

215 MONEY AND BANKING 

3 sem. hrs. 

Development and growth of the monetary system. Empha- 
sis on monetary theory and applied policy issues. Prerequi- 
sites: ECO 101 and 102, or 105. 

220 LAW AND ECONOMICS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Overview of economic analysis of topics in the common 
law including property, contract, tort and criminal law. 
Prerequisites: ECO 101 or 105. 

225 LABOR ECONOMICS AND LABOR PROBLEMS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Economic aspects of labor and trade unionism. Emphasis 
on wage determination, bargaining, manpower and unions. 
Prerequisites: ECO 101 and 102, or 105. 

230 ECONOMICS OF DIFFERENCE: GENDER, 
ETHNICITY, AND BEYOND 
3 sem. hrs. 

Differences in economic opportunities and outcomes, includ- 
ing the role of systems, institutions, culture, and preferences. 
Prerequisite: ECO 105. 

235 TELECOMMUNICATIONS 
ECONOMICS AND PUBLIC POLICY 

3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to economics and public policy issues con- 
fronting the telecommunications industry, including legal 
aspects, standards, privacy and security issues. Prerequi- 
sites: ECO 101 or 105. 

236 ECONOMICS OF ENERGY AND 
PUBLIC POLICY 

3 sem. hrs. 

Economic analysis of the production, distribution and use of 
energy with special emphasis on alternative and renewable 
energy sources. Prerequisites: ECO 101 and 102, or 105. 

238 USING REGRESSION AND 
ECONOMETRIC METHODS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Non-theoretical study of the basic concepts of regression 
analysis and econometrics which emphasizes real-world 
applications, statistical computing, and learning-by-doing. 
Formerly USING ECONOMETRICS Prerequisites: ECO 
101 and 102 or 105. and 1 of the following: ECO 138 or 
GEO 138 or POL 138 or PSY 138 or ECO 148 or MQM 100. 



168 



Economics 



239 MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Theoretical and applied study of demand, cost, and produc- 
tion related to the theory of the firm. Developments of cur- 
rent interest; empirical studies intended to affirm or 
disaffirm applicability of economic principles. Prerequi- 
sites: ECO 101 or 105. MAT 121 or 145 required; and 1 of 
the following: ECO 138 or GEO 138 or POL 138 or PSY 
138 or ECO 148 recommended. 

240 INTERMEDIATE 
MICROECONOMIC THEORY 

3 sem. hrs. 

Emphasis on topics regarding resource allocation, scarcity, 
and distribution of income; theory of consumer choice, theo- 
ry of the firm, market structures, factor markets, distribution 
of income, welfare economics, and general equilibrium. 
Prerequisites: ECO 101 or 102, or 105; and one of the fol- 
lowing: ECO 138 or GEO 138 or POL 138 or PSY 138 or 
ECO 148 or MQM 100; and MAT 121 or 145. 

241 INTERMEDIATE 
MACROECONOMIC THEORY 

3 sem. hrs. 

Theory of income, employment, interest rate and price level 
determination. The government's influence on these vari- 
ables via monetary and fiscal policies. Prerequisites: ECO 
101 and 102, or 105; and one of the following: ECO 138 or 
GEO 138 or POL 138 or PSY 138 or ECO 148 or MQM 
100; and MAT 121 or 145. 

245 THE INTERNATIONAL ECONOMY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Economic aspects of international issues and problems. 
Analysis of international trade, trade restrictions, exchange 
rates and the balance of payments. Prerequisites: ECO 101 
and 102, or 105. 

255 INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL 
AND NATURAL RESOURCE ECONOMICS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Overview of natural resource and environmental econom- 
ics. Topics include management of renewable and nonre- 
newable resources and the economically efficient approach 
to pollution control. Prerequisites: ECO 101 or 105. 

300 SENIOR PROJECT 
1 sem. hr. 

Involves independent out-of-class work on a project 
designed in consultation with the instructor in the concur- 
rent 300-level course. Prerequisites: ECO 240 and 241. To 
be taken concurrently with a 300-level Economic course. 

320 INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Theoretical and empirical analysis of basic influences on 
industrial markets and performances. Market practices, the 
role of competition, and related policy issues. Prerequisite: 
One 200-level ECO course. 

326 ECONOMICS OF HUMAN RESOURCES 
3 sem. hrs. 

Theoretical and empirical analysis of labor markets. Educa- 
tion and training, labor mobility, wage structure, discrimina- 
tion, unemployment, wage and incomes policies. 
Prerequisites: ECO 225 or 240. 



329 ECONOMICS ISSUES IN EDUCATION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Analysis of economic issues in education including effi- 
ciency and equity, public vs. private provision of educa- 
tional services, and education as human capital. 
Prerequisite: ECO 225 or 240. 

335 ECONOMICS OF REGULATION 
AND ANTITRUST 

3 sem. hrs. 

The origins, aims, methods, and effects of economic regula- 
tion and antitrust, with an emphasis on case studies. Prereq- 
uisite: ECO 239 or 240. 

339 ORGANIZATIONAL ECONOMICS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Economic analysis of firm boundaries, make or buy deci- 
sions, incentive contracts and supply relationships, repeated 
interaction and reputations, organizational structure and relat- 
ed management applications. Prerequisite: ECO 239 or 240. 

340 HEALTH ECONOMICS AND POLICY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Study the production of health care and the market forces 
that act on individuals, providers, institutions, and policy 
design. Prerequisite: ECO 240. 

345 INTERNATIONAL TRADE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Causes and consequences of international trade. Analysis 
of tariffs, quotas, other trade restrictions, current trade 
policy and multinational corporations. Prerequisite: ECO 
240 or 245. 

346 INTERNATIONAL FINANCE 

3 sem. hrs. 

Mechanisms of international payments and evaluation of 
the international monetary system. Topics include 
exchange rates, balance of payments, international mone- 
tary cooperation, and connections between the domestic 
and international economy. Prerequisite: ECO 241 or 245. 

350 PUBLIC FINANCE 

3 sem. hrs. 

Analysis of the economic impacts of government expendi- 
tures and taxes on the allocation of resources and the distrib- 
ution of income. Prerequisite: One 200-level ECO course. 

353 REGRESSION AND TIME SERIES 
ANALYSIS 

4 sem. hrs. 

Regression and time series methods for business and eco- 
nomic applications, including exponential smoothing and 
Box-Jenkins methods. Computer statistical package used. 
Also offered as MAT 353. Formerly ANALYSIS OF TIME 
SERIES. Prerequisites: C or better in MAT 351 or equiva- 
lent or consent instructor. 

360 HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN ECONOMY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Recent empirical studies and applications of economic the- 
ory to historical problems in an American context. Causes 
of the Great Depression, economics of slavery, and roles of 
agriculture, industry, and government in growth. Prerequi- 
sites: Two 200-level ECO courses or consent instructor. 



372 HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT 
3 sem. hrs. 

Economic analysis from the Mercantilists to the American 
Institutionalists. Relates earlier schools of thought to the 
contemporary. Prerequisites: Two 200-level ECO courses 
or consent instructor. 

398 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: INTERNSHIP 
IN ECONOMIC RESEARCH 
1-6 sem. hrs. 

On-the-job experience as a practicing economist in pri- 
vate industry or government. Interns may be involved in 
all phases and types of economic research. CR/NC only; 
not for credit major/minor; must complete department 
application. Prerequisites: ECO major/minor and consent 
department Professional Practice Coordinator; 2.20 GPA, 
and 50 hours credit. 



ENGLISH (ENG) 424 

409 Stevenson Hall, (309) 438-3667 
Web address: English.IllinoisState.edu 

Chairperson: Joan Mullin. 
Tenured/Tenure-track Faculty: 

Distinguished Professor: Shields, White. 

Professors: Brasseur, Broad, Coats, Cruz, DeSantis, Huff, 

Hunt, Kalmbach, McLaughlin, Mullin, Neuleib, Saunders, 

Savage, Susina, Thompson, Trites. 

Associate Professors: Breu, Burt, Demirci, Dykstra, Fleisher, 

Gudding, Jung, Justice, Kalter, Kim, McBride, op de Beeck, 

Ressler, Smith, Walker, Zona. 

Assistant Professors: Ball, Haas, Harris, Hochstetler, Kang, 

Manavalli, Patterson, Robiliard. 



General Department Information 

INTERDISCIPLINARY MINORS 

The Department of English participates in a number of 
interdisciplinary minors at the University. Course work 
offered by the Department contributes to the following 
minors: African-American Studies, Children's Studies, 
Cognitive Science, Ethnic Studies, International Studies, 
Middle Eastern and South Asian Studies, Native American 
Studies, and Women's and Gender Studies. For further 
information on these minors and their advisors, please con- 
sult the University-Wide Curriculum section in this Under- 
graduate Catalog. 

HONORS IN ENGLISH 

The Department of English offers honors work to 
qualified students. Honors work includes intensive study 
in a special area of the student's major or minor. Each 
individual project is to culminate in a comprehensive 
written report and/or examination. Honors work is open 
only to resident students who have achieved superior aca- 
demic records and who have demonstrated the ability to 
profit from independent study. 



Economics; English 

English Programs 



169 



Degree Offered: B.A. (All English majors and students in the 
Teacher Certification Sequence) 

Admission to the English major may be affected and 
restricted by the lack of available Department resources 
in times of oversubscription. 

MAJOR IN ENGLISH 

— 40 hours in English required, exclusive of ENG 101 
and courses in the teaching of English (291, 295, 296, 
297, 395). 

— Required courses: ENG 100 with a grade of C or better, 
102 and 300. 

— 3 hours selected from: ENG 283, 284, 285, 286. 

— 3 hours of British literature selected from: ENG 110, 
213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 218, 219, 222, 223, 311, 320, 
324, 325, 327, 328, 329, 378, 386, 387, 388. 

— 3 hours of American literature selected from: ENG 
130, 165, 231, 232, 233, 234, 236, 265, 266, 328, 
332,336,365. 

— 3 hours in language and linguistics selected from: ENG 
241,243,245,310,311,341,342. 

— 3 hours in advanced writing selected from: ENG 246, 
247, 248, 249. 

— Of the remaining 18 hours, at least 12 hours of elec- 
tives at the 200- through 300-level. Students should 
consult an English Department Academic Advisor in 
choosing their electives. 

Publishing Studies Sequence: 

This program is designed to prepare graduates for 
careers in academic, commercial, digital, literary, nonprofit, 
or technical publishing. 

— 2.75 GPA in English courses taken at Illinois State 
University required. 

— 52 hours required. 

— 19 hours in English core: ENG 100 with a grade of C or 
better, ENG 102 and 300; 6 hours selected from ENG 
283, 284, 285, or 286; 3 hours selected from British Lit- 
erature courses; and 3 hours selected from American 
Literature courses. 

— 18 hours of foundational courses: ENG 247, 249, 254, 
353, and 354; 3 hours from either ENG 350 or 35 1 . 

— 6 hours advanced courses selected from: ENG 355, 356, 
or 357. 

— 6 hours ENG 398. 

— 3 hours selected from any 300-level English course. 

Teacher Certification Sequence: 

— To graduate in the English Major. 

— Admission to the English Teacher Certification 
Sequence is limited and is based on space availability 
and competitiveness of the applicant. 

— A 3.00 GPA in the major, a grade of C or better in all 
required major courses, and adherence to all application 
procedures and deadlines is required for admission to 



170 



English 



Professional Studies and Student Teaching. Deadlines 
and information about application forms and procedures 
for admission to Professional Studies and Student 
Teaching are available from the Council for Teacher 
Education and on the English Department website and 
are strictly enforced. 

— 46 hours in English required, exclusive of ENG 101 . 

— Completion of entitlement program leading to certifi- 
cation: secondary 6-12. 

— Required courses for certification and accreditation: 
ENG 243, 246, 283, 296, and 297. ENG 296 and 297 
must be completed with a C or better; these courses 
include 25 clock-hours of state-mandated pre-student 
teaching Clinical Experiences. 

— Additional required courses: ENG 100 with a grade of 
C or better, ENG 102 and 300. 

— 3 hours of British literature selected from ENG 110, 
213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 218, 219, 222, 223, 311, 320, 
324, 325, 327, 328, 329, 378, 386, 387, 388. 

— 3 hours of American literature selected from ENG 
130, 165, 231, 232, 233, 234, 236, 265, 266, 328, 
332,336,365. 

— 3 hours in language and linguistics selected from ENG 
241,310. 

— 3 hours in non-Western literature selected from ENG 
206,255,261,266,352,374. 

— 3 hours in adolescent literature: ENG 375. 

— Of the remaining 9 hours of electives, 6 must be com- 
pleted at the 200- through 300-level. Students should 
select their electives in consultation with the English 
Education Advisor. ENG 227 is strongly recommend- 
ed for students who have not taken a high school or 
community college course in creative writing. 

MINOR IN ENGLISH 

— 18 hours in English required, exclusive of ENG 101 
and courses in the teaching of English (291, 295, 296, 
297, 395). 

— Required courses: 3 hours of literature selected from 
ENG 110, 130, 150; 3 hours of writing selected from 
ENG 246, 247, 248, 249, 347, 349; 3 hours of language 
selected from ENG 241, 243, 244, 245, 310, 341, 342; 9 
hours of electives selected from ENG 160, 165, 229, 
250, 251, 260, 261, 271, 272, 308, 360, 365, 370 (cours- 
es that were not selected from the literature, writing, or 
language course lists can also serve as electives). 

— At least 12 of the 18 hours must be at the 200- through 
300-level. 

MINOR IN ENGLISH 
For Teacher Education: 

— 24 hours in English required, exclusive of ENG 101. 

— 2.50 GPA in all English courses taken at Illinois State 
University. 

— Required courses: 6 hours in literature: ENG 229 and 3 
hours from ENG 1 10, 130, 150; 6 hours in writing: ENG 
145, 246; 3 hours in language: ENG 243. 



— 9 hours of electives from: ENG 160, 165, 241, 244, 245, 
247, 248, 249, 250, 251, 260, 261, 271, 272, 308, 310, 
341, 342, 347, 349, 360, 365, 370 (courses not selected 
from the literature, writing, or language course lists can 
also serve as electives). 

— At least 1 5 of the 24 hours must be at the 200- through 
300-level. 

The Minor in English for Teacher Education does not 
lead directly to teacher certification. Students seeking an 
additional teaching endorsement in this academic area 
should contact their advisor or the Illinois State Board of 
Education Web site (www.isbe.net) for specific certification 
requirements. 

MINOR IN TEACHING ENGLISH TO SPEAKERS OF 
OTHER LANGUAGES (TESOL) 

Students enrolling in this program must have at least 2 
years of a foreign language or equivalent at the college level 
in the case of a native speaker of English, or demonstrated 
proficiency in English at a level commensurate with the stu- 
dent's role as a language model and instructor in the case of 
a non-native speaker of English. 

— 1 8 hours required. 

— Required courses: ENG 341, 343, 344, 345, and 346; 
3 hours selected from ENG 241, 243, 310, 342, 440, 
and COM 370. 

— Elective practicum ENG 394. 

Approval Certificate in Teaching English as a Second 
Language: 

Students of both graduate and undergraduate standing 
may obtain an Illinois State Approval for Teaching English 
as a Second Language by fulfilling the following require- 
ments: (1) fulfill Teacher Education Certification require- 
ments of either the Standard Elementary and/or High School 
Certificate, (2) complete the 18 hours of required course- 
work as listed in the minor in TESOL above, and (3) obtain 
1 00 clock hours of ESL Clinical Experience or 3 months of 
teaching experience in English as a Second Language at the 
appropriate level. This practical experience may be obtained 
by enrolling in ENG 394. 

CLINICAL EXPERIENCES IN TEACHER EDUCATION 

Clinical Experiences are provided in off-campus clinical 
teaching centers, in local schools and in campus laboratory 
schools, in agencies and other approved non-school settings. 

All students will show verification of having completed 
pre-student teaching field experiences commensurate with 
attaining local, state, and national standards. Students must 
provide their own transportation to Clinical Experience sites. 

The approximate number of clinical hours and type of 
activity associated with each course offering can be found 
with the appropriate course description. The following 
legend relates to the type and kind of activity related to a 
specific course. 



English 



171 



Clinical Experiences Legend 

1 . Observation 

2. Tutoring one-on-one contact 

3. Non-instruction assisting 

4. Instructional aiding a group 

5. Micro teaching 

6. Simulation lab exercises 

7. Work with clinic client 

8. Graduate practicum 

9. Professional meeting 

10. Other 

MINOR IN WRITING 

Courses taken for the Writing Minor may not count for 
the English Major. 

— 24 hours required. 

- 6 hours selected from ENG 246, 247, 249. 

— 6 hours selected from one of the following areas: 
Creative Writing: ENG 347.01, 347.02, 348. 
Rhetoric and Composition: ENG 145, 243, 244, 248, 
283, 391, 392. Technical Writing: ENG 349, 350, 
351,353. 

— 9 hours of electives in writing. May include any of 
the above courses, ENG 398, and up to six hours in 
writing courses from other departments: COM 165, 
166,265,268,269,321,385. 

— ENG 396. 



English Courses 

The courses offered by the Department of English fall 
into three categories: those for the General Education Pro- 
gram, those for major and minor fields, and those for spe- 
cialized aspects in English. English 101 is required of all 
students for the General Education Program, and it is 
strongly recommended that students take 101 before taking 
further courses in English. 

100 INTRODUCTION TO ENGLISH STUDIES 

3 sem. hrs. 

Reading and writing in English, an introduction to the vari- 
ous sub-disciplines of English. Prerequisite: English major 
only. Concurrent registration in ENG 102. 

101 COMPOSITION AS CRITICAL 
INQUIRY IC 
3 sem. hrs. 

Rhetorical approach to writing, taught through extensive col- 
laborative drafting, revising, and editing. Emphasis on criti- 
cal reading and analysis. Computer-assisted. Not for credit 
major/minor. May not be taken under the CT/NC option. 
Formerly COMPOSITION AND CRITICAL INQUIRY. 

102 INTRODUCTION TO ENGLISH 
STUDIES PROSEMINAR 

1 sem. hr. 

A structured proseminar designed to introduce students to 
the complex intellectual and professional aspects of the 
degree in English Studies. CR/NC only. Prerequisite: Con- 
current registration in ENG 100. 



110 ENGLISH LITERATURE AND 

ITS CONTEXTS OC-H 

3 sem. hrs. 

A historical study of the main movements in English liter- 
ature. Readings of entire works representative of the 
movements. Formerly BRITISH LITERATURE AND ITS 
CONTEXTS and SURVEY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE. 
Prerequisites: ENG 101; COM 1 10. 

124 FILM STYLE AND LITERATURE MC-LH 

3 sem. hrs. 

An introduction to the analysis of films and their literary 
components through an application of specialized terms 
and concepts. Not for credit if had ENG 107. Formerly 
ENG 189.61. Prerequisites: ENG 101. 



125 



MC-LH 



LITERARY NARRATIVE 

3 sem. hrs. 

Critical reading and analysis of a variety of literary narra- 
tives that reflect on human experience. May not be taken 
under the CT/NC option. Also offered as LAN 125. Not for 
credit major/minor. Prerequisites: ENG 101; COM 110 or 
concurrent registration. 

128 GENDER IN THE 

HUMANITIES MC-LH 

3 sem. hrs. 

Examination of gender roles, norms, and stereotypes from a 
broad range of perspectives within humanities across centuries 
and cultures. May not be taken under the CT/NC option. Also 
offered as COM/LAN 128. Prerequisites: ENG 101; COM 
1 10 or concurrent registration. 

130 SURVEY OF AMERICAN 
LITERATURE 

3 sem. hrs. 

A historical study of the main movements in American 
literature. Readings of entire works representative of 
the movements. 

131 AMERICAN CULTURE: 
TRADITIONS AND TEXTS MC-UST 

3 sem. hrs. 

Historical introduction to American culture through analysis 
of written texts and artifacts such as works of fine art. May 
not be taken under the CT/NC option. Also offered as HIS 
131. Not for credit major/minor. Prerequisites: ENG 101 or 
COM 1 10 or concurrent registration. 

143 UNITY AND DIVERSITY 

IN LANGUAGE OC-SS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to the disciplined study of human language as it 
reflects human cognition, social relations, cultural conven- 
tions, and speech communities. Also offered as ANT/LAN 
143. Prerequisite: Completion of Inner Core. 

145 WRITING IN THE 

ACADEMIC DISCIPLINES 

3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to research-based writing for multiple academic 
audiences. Computer-assisted. Formerly LANGUAGE AND 
COMPOSITION II. Prerequisite: ENG 101. 



172 



English 



150 WORLD LITERATURE TO 

14TH CENTURY OC-H 

3 sem. hrs. 

Readings in ancient and medieval literature, including 
Dante. Formerly MASTERPIECES OF WORLD LITERA- 
TURE TO 1350. 

160 INTRODUCTION TO STUDIES IN 
WOMEN'S WRITING 

3 sem. hrs. 

Readings in a variety of genres and historical periods. For- 
merly WOMEN IN LITERATURE. 

165 INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN-AMERICAN 
LITERATURE AND CULTURE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Selected topics in African-American literature and culture. 
Formerly AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERA TURE. 

170 FOUNDATIONS IN LITERATURE 
FOR CHILDREN 

3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to genres of children's literature, including 
mythologies, fairy tales, picture books, poetry, and histori- 
cal, multicultural, and current prose. 

201 SPECIALIZED KNOWLEDGE 
AND INTEGRATIVE CONTEXTS 
IN ENGLISH STUDIES 

3 sem. hrs. 

Study of a specialized topic (a writer, a literary form, a 
concept in linguistics or in writing, etc) from several disci- 
plinary perspectives within English Studies. May repeat if 
content differs. Prerequisites: ENG 100 with a grade of C 
or better, ENG 102, or consent of instructor. 

206 CULTURAL EXPRESSIONS IN SOCIAL 
CONTEXTS: WOMEN OF ASIA, LATIN 
AMERICA AND AFRICA OC-H 

3 sem. hrs. 

Interdisciplinary study of varieties of women's cultural 
expressions within distinct social contexts including com- 
parative emphasis on different regions of concern. Also 
offered as LAN 206. Prerequisites: ENG 101; COM 110; 
MC-IS category. WGS 120 recommended. 

213 MEDIEVAL STUDIES 
3 sem. hrs. 

Literature written in English from the 8th century to the 
15th. Formerly MEDIEVAL ENGLISH LITERATURE 
AND CULTURE. Prerequisites: ENG 100 with a grade C or 
better, ENG 1 02, or consent of instructor. 

214 EARLY MODERN STUDIES 
3 sem. hrs. 

Studies of texts in a variety of genres from the 1 6th and 1 7th 
centuries. Formerly LITERATURE OF THE ENGLISH 
RENAISSANCE. Prerequisites: ENG 100 with a grade of C 
or better, ENG 102, or consent of instructor. 

216 STUDIES IN EIGHTEENTH 

CENTURY ENGLISH LITERATURE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Selected writers and genres from the restoration of Charles 
II to the crown in 1660 to the beginnings of Romanticism. 
Formerly BRITISH LITERATURE OF THE EIGHTEENTH 
CENTURY. Prerequisites: ENG 100 with a grade of C or 
better, ENG 102, or consent of instructor. 



217 STUDIES IN ROMANTICISM 
3 sem. hrs. 

Studies of texts from the Romantic period. Formerly 
BRITISH LITERATURE OF THE ROMANTIC PERIOD. 
Prerequisites: ENG 100 with a grade of C or better, ENG 
102, or consent of instructor. 

218 STUDIES IN THE VICTORIAN PERIOD 
3 sem. hrs. 

Studies of texts from the 19th century. Formerly BRITISH LIT- 
ERATURE OF THE VICTORIAN PERIOD. Prerequisites: 
ENG 100 with a grade of C or better, ENG 102, or consent of 
instructor. 

219 STUDIES IN CONTEMPORARY 
ENGLISH LITERATURE 

3 sem. hrs. 

Studies in texts written in English from the Contemporary 
period. Formerly CONTEMPORARY BRITISH LITERA- 
TURE. Prerequisites: 100 with a grade of C or better, ENG 
102, or consent of instructor. 

222 STUDIES IN SHAKESPEARE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Selected readings with emphasis on the relationship 
between the author, the text, and the larger culture. For- 
merly SHAKESPEARE'S EARLIER WORKS. Prerequi- 
sites: ENG 100 with a grade of C or better, ENG 102, or 
consent of instructor. 

227 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING 
3 sem. hrs. 

Opportunity for creative writing of various kinds, such as 
poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. 

229 INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY 

GENRES OC-H 

3 sem. hrs. 

Formal and historical study of literary genres— poetry, drama, 
prose narrative — as structures of knowledge. Not for credit 
Major. Prerequisites: ENG 101; COM 1 10; MC-LH category. 

231 AMERICAN LITERATURE: 1607-1830 
3 sem. hrs. 

Colonial American writers from the beginnings of American 
literature through the early national period. Prerequisites: 
Grade of C or better in ENG 100; ENG 102, or consent 
instructor. 

232 AMERICAN LITERATURE: 1830-1870 
3 sem. hrs. 

Main figures and movements of mid- 1 9th century Ameri- 
can literature. Prerequisites: ENG 100 with a grade of C or 
better, ENG 102, or consent of instructor. 

233 AMERICAN LITERATURE: 1870-1920 
3 sem. hrs. 

Major trends in American literature from the Reconstruction 
Era and Indian Wars period until World War I. Prerequisites: 
ENG 100 with a grade C or better, ENG 102, or consent of 
instructor. 

234 AMERICAN LITERATURE: 1920-1945 
3 sem. hrs. 

Trends in American literature between the World Wars. 
Prerequisites: ENG 100 with a C or better, ENG 102, or 
consent of instructor. 



236 AMERICAN LITERATURE: 1945-PRESENT 
3 sem. hrs. 

Present-day trends in American literature. Prerequisites: 
ENG 100 with a grade of C or better, ENG 102, or consent 
of instructor. 

239 MULTIMODAL COMPOSITION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Workshop emphasizing rhetorical analysis and composition of 
digital texts in a variety of modes including graphics, typogra- 
phy, audio, video, animation. May be repeated; maximum 6 
hours. Formerly ENG 289.22 MULTIMEDIA WRITING 
WORKSHOP. Prerequisite: ENG 101. 

241 GROWTH AND STRUCTURE 
OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE 
3 sem. hrs. 

An introduction to the history of English designed to help 
students understand language change and the emergence of 
contemporary English. 

243 THE GRAMMATICAL STRUCTURE 
OF ENGLISH 

3 sem. hrs. 

Linguistic description of present day American English, 
focusing on morphology and syntax. Formerly TRADITION- 
AL AND NON-TRADITIONAL GRAMMARS. 

244 APPLIED GRAMMAR AND 
USAGE FOR WRITERS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Traditional, structural, and transformational grammars applied 
to needs of writers. Choosing among alternative grammatical 
strategies. Usage; semantics of punctuation. Revising. Prereq- 
uisites: Grade of C or better in ENG 100 or 145. 

245 SEMANTICS 
3 sem. hrs. 

The nature of meaning and the functions of language. 

246 ADVANCED EXPOSITION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Extensive writing of essays developed in greater depth and 
sophistication in subject matter than those written in previ- 
ous writing courses. Computer-assisted. Prerequisites: C or 
better in ENG 100 or 145. 

247 INTERMEDIATE CREATIVE WRITING 
3 sem. hrs. 

Workshop in the genre, with critical examination of its 
conventions. Topics offered: .01, Poetry; .02, Fiction; .03, 
Nonfiction. May repeat if topic differs. Formerly CRE- 
ATIVE WRITING. Prerequisites: C or better in ENG 227 
or junior/senior standing; or consent instructor. 

248 LEGAL WRITING 
3 sem. hrs. 

Study of the rhetoric of legal writing and the role of written 
communication within the legal profession. Prerequisite: 
ENG 101. 

249 TECHNICAL AND PROFESSIONAL 
WRITING I 

3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to technical and professional writing. Includes 
study of manuals, reports, proposals, audience analysis, for- 
matting, and style. Materials charge optional. Prerequisite: 
ENG 101. 



English 
OC-H 



173 



250 LITERATURE OF THE BIBLE ] 
3 sem. hrs. 

Major ideas and literary forms of the Hebrew Bible/Christ- 
ian Old Testament. Prerequisites: Completion of Inner Core, 
and MC-LH category. 

251 LITERATURE OF THE BIBLE II OC-H 

3 sem. hrs. 

Major ideas and literary forms of the Christian Bible (New 
Testament) and Apocrypha. Prerequisites: Completion of 
Inner Core, and MC-LH category. 

252 GLOBAL LITERATURE TO 1800 
3 sem. hrs. 

Comparative study of significant texts of global literature 
prior to 1800. Formerly WORLD LITERATURE TO 1800. 
Prerequisites: ENG 100 with a grade of C or better, ENG 
1 02, or consent of instructor. 

254 INTRODUCTION TO 
PROFESSIONAL PUBLISHING 
3 sem. hrs. 

Study and practice of editorial, production, printing, and 
marketing processes involved with producing a book or jour- 
nal. Computer assisted. Materials charge optional. Prerequi- 
sites: ENG 100 with a grade of C or better, ENG 102, or 
consent of instructor, and B or better in ENG 101. 

255 MODERN GLOBAL LITERATURE: 
1800-PRESENT 

3 sem. hrs. 

Comparative study of significant texts of modern global 
literature. Formerly MODERN WORLD LITERATURE: 
1800-PRESENT. Prerequisites: ENG 100 with a grade of 
C or better, ENG 1 02, or consent of instructor. 

260 HISTORY OF LITERATURE 
BY WOMEN 

3 sem. hrs. 

A historical overview of writing by women. Prerequisites: 
ENG 100 with a grade of C or better, ENG 102, or consent 
of instructor. 

261 WOMEN'S LITERATURE IN A 
GLOBAL CONTEXT OC-H 

3 sem. hrs. 

Literature by women of diverse ethnicities to examine vari- 
eties of texts and their cultural construction. Prerequisites: 
ENG 101; COM 110; MC-LH category. 

265 FOUNDATIONS OF AFRICAN-AMERICAN 
LITERATURE AND CULTURE 

3 sem. hrs. 

Concepts, themes, generic conventions, and major histori- 
cal events and figures central to African-American litera- 
ture and culture. Prerequisites: ENG 100 with a grade of C 
or better, ENG 1 02, or consent of instructor. 

266 NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE 
AND CULTURE 

3 sem. hrs. 

Study of Native American literature, orality, and culture. 
Prerequisites: ENG 100 with a C or better, ENG 102, or 
consent of instructor. 



174 



English 



267 FOUNDATIONS OF U.S. LATINO/A 
LITERATURES AND CULTURES 

3 sem. hrs. 

Concepts, themes, genre conventions, and major historical 
events and figures significant in U.S. Latino/a literatures and 
cultures. Prerequisites: ENG 100 with a grade C or better, 
ENG 1 02, or consent of instructor. 

271 LITERATURE FOR YOUNG CHILDREN 
3 sem. hrs. 

Analysis of works written for children ages 5 to 9, includ- 
ing multicultural picture books, fairy tales, poetry, and 
chapter books. Does not repeat material of ENG 170. 

272 LITERATURE FOR MIDDLE GRADES 
3 sem. hrs. 

Analysis of works written for children ages 9 to 13, including 
multicultural novels and information books, children's media, 
and culture. Does not repeat material of ENG 1 70. Formerly 
LITEM JURE FOR PRE-ADOLESCENTS. 

283 RHETORICAL THEORY AND APPLICATIONS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Critical and analytical examination of the nature and histori- 
cal development of rhetorical theory and its applications to 
contemporary discourse. Prerequisites: ENG 100 with a 
grade of C or better, ENG 102, or consent of instructor. ENG 
major only. 

284 POETRY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Critical and analytical examination of the nature and historical 
development of poetry. Prerequisites: ENG 100 with a grade 
of C or better, ENG 102, or consent of instructor. ENG 
major only. 

285 DRAMA 
3 sem. hrs. 

Critical and analytical examination of the nature and historical 
development of drama as a genre. Prerequisites: ENG 100 
with a grade of C or better, ENG 102, or consent of instruc- 
tor. ENG major only. 

286 PROSE 

3 sem. hrs. 

Critical and analytical examination of the nature and histori- 
cal development of prose literature — fiction and non-fiction. 
Prerequisites: ENG 100 with a grade of C or better, ENG 
1 02, or consent of instructor. ENG major only. 

290 LANGUAGE ARTS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Study of language acquisition and research in critical think- 
ing, listening, speaking, writing, vocabulary development, 
usage, and spelling for children. 

295 TEACHING LITERATURE AND WRITING 
IN THE MIDDLE SCHOOL 
3 sem. hrs. 

Surveys recent scholarship on composition and literary theory 
and examines implications for teaching literature and writing 
at the middle school level. Computer assisted. Not to be 
taken by English Education major without permission. 



296 THE TEACHING OF LITERATURE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Examines current scholarship in the teaching of literature at 
the secondary level; integrates theories of teaching literature 
with teaching practice. Includes Clinical Experiences: 10 
hours, Type 1-5 and 9. Prerequisites: Admission to Profes- 
sional Studies; C or better in C&I 216; Completion of one of 
the following: ENG 110, 213, 214, 216, 217, 218, 219, 311, 
320, 324, 325, 327, 328, 329, 378, 386, 387, 388; and one of 
the following: ENG 130, 165, 231, 232, 233, 234, 236, 265, 
266, 328, 332, 336, 365. 

297 THE TEACHING OF WRITING 

3 sem. hrs. 

Examines current scholarship in the teaching of writing at the 
secondary level; integrates theories of teaching writing with 
teaching practice. Includes Clinical Experiences: 15 hours, 
Type 1-5 and 9. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in ENG 
243, 246, 296. Admission to Professional Studies. 

300 SENIOR SEMINAR 
3 sem. hrs. 

Capstone course for English majors, synthesizing the 
main dimensions of English studies. Requires senior pro- 
ject and portfolio. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in 
ENG 100; ENG 102; English major, senior standing and 
consent of instructor. 

308 LITERATURE AND THE RELATED ARTS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Formal, aesthetic, and cultural relationships among litera- 
ture, art, music, drama, film, and other related arts. Prereq- 
uisites: Junior/senior standing or consent of instructor. 

310 HISTORY AND DEVELOPMENT 
OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Development of the English language from the Old English 
period to the present. Prerequisites: Junior/senior standing 
or consent of instructor. 

311 INTRODUCTION TO OLD ENGLISH 
LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

3 sem. hrs. 

Elements of Old English grammar, with selected readings 
in Old English literature. Prerequisites: Junior/senior 
standing or consent of instructor. 

320 CHAUCER 
3 sem. hrs. 

Literary and linguistic study of the major works of 
Chaucer; text in Middle English. Prerequisites: ENG 100 
with a grade of C or better, ENG 102, junior/senior stand- 
ing; or consent of instructor. 

324 MILTON 
3 sem. hrs. 

Poetry and prose of John Milton. Prerequisites: ENG 100 
with a C or better, ENG 102, junior/senior standing; or con- 
sent of instructor. 

325 ENGLISH DRAMA BEFORE 1642 
3 sem. hrs. 

English drama from its beginning to the closing of the the- 
atres. Prerequisites: ENG 100 with a grade of C or better, 
ENG 102, junior/senior standing; or consent of instructor. 



English 



175 



327 RESTORATION AND EIGHTEENTH- 
CENTURY DRAMA 

3 sem. hrs. 

English drama from the opening of the theatres in 1 660 
to the turn of the nineteenth century. Prerequisites: 
ENG 100 with a grade of C or better, ENG 102, junior/senior 
standing; or consent of instructor. 

328 MODERN ENGLISH DRAMA 
3 sem. hrs. 

20th-century drama written in English and related criticism. 
Formerly MODERN BRITISH AND AMERICAN DRAMA. 
Prerequisites: ENG 100 with a grade of C or better, ENG 
102, junior/senior standing; or consent of instructor. 

329 SELECTED FIGURES IN 
ENGLISH LITERATURE 

3 sem. hrs. 

Topics in specific literary figures, genres, or movements. 
May repeat if content differs. Formerly SELECTED FIG- 
URES IN BRITISH LITERATURE. Prerequisites: ENG 
100 with a grade of C or better, ENG 102, junior/senior 
standing; or consent of instructor. 

332 SELECTED FIGURES IN 
AMERICAN LITERATURE 

3 sem. hrs. 

Topics in literary figures, genres, or movements. May repeat 
if content differs. Prerequisites: C or better in ENG 100; 
ENG 102, and junior/senior standing; or consent instructor. 

336 THE AMERICAN NOVEL 
3 sem. hrs. 

Historical survey of major American novelists, including 
authors such as Twain, Hawthorne, Melville, Crane, Hem- 
ingway, Faulkner, and Barth. May repeat if content differs; 
maximum 6 hours. Prerequisites: ENG 100 with a C or bet- 
ter, ENG 102, junior/senior standing; or consent instructor. 

341 INTRODUCTION TO 
DESCRIPTIVE LINGUISTICS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Aims and methods of linguistic science. Nature and func- 
tions of language: phonology, morphology, syntax, varia- 
tion. Prerequisites: Junior/senior standing or consent 
instructor. 

342 SOCIOLINGUISTICS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Social significance of language variation: regional, social, eth- 
nic dialects; attitudes toward variation. Multilingual societies, 
language choice, language shift, language planning. Also 
offered as ANT 342. Prerequisites: Junior/senior standing or 
consent instructor. 

343 CROSS-CULTURAL ISSUES IN TESOL 
3 sem. hrs. 

The relationship between language, culture, and cultural 
awareness in the learning and teaching of English as a Sec- 
ond Language. Prerequisites: ENG 241 or 243 or 341. 
Junior/senior standing or consent instructor. 

344 TESOL: THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Linguistic theories; first and second language acquisition; 
cognitive, affective, and cultural factors in teaching English 
as a Second Language. Prerequisites: ENG 243 or 341. 
Junior/senior standing or consent instructor. 



345 TESOL: METHODS AND MATERIALS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Methodologies and techniques for teaching English as a 
Second Language; evaluation of materials for various 
levels and instructional goals. Includes Clinical Experi- 
ences. Prerequisites: ENG 344. Junior/senior standing or 
consent instructor. 

346 ASSESSMENT AND TESTING IN ESL 
3 sem. hrs. 

Assessing oral and written proficiency in English as a Second 
Language. Prerequisites: ENG 341. Junior/senior standing or 
consent instructor. 

347 ADVANCED CREATIVE WRITING 
3 sem. hrs. 

Workshop format for individual projects; related theory. 
Topics: .01, Poetry; .02 Prose; .03, Creative Nonfiction. May 
repeat if content differs. Prerequisites: ENG 247 or graduate 
standing. Junior/senior standing or consent instructor. 

348 PLAYWRITING 
3 sem. hrs. 

Playwriting techniques of selected masters with practical 
application of techniques in writing original plays. Also 
offered as THE 348. 

349 TECHNICAL AND PROFESSIONAL 
WRITING II 

3 sem. hrs. 

Instruction and practice in editing, proposals, and analyti- 
cal writing; attention given to style manuals, research 
writing, and (as needed) publication. Computer-assisted. 
Also offered as TEC 349. Materials charge optional. Pre- 
requisites: ENG 249 or graduate standing. Junior/senior 
standing or consent instructor. 

350 VISIBLE RHETORIC 
3 sem. hrs. 

Document design as a rhetorical activity and the application 
of theories of visible rhetoric to document production. Com- 
puter-assisted. Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: 
Junior/senior standing; ENG 239, 246, 247, or 249 or con- 
sent instructor. 

351 HYPERTEXT 
3 sem. hrs. 

Workshop using digital technologies to compose com- 
plex, multimodal, web-based texts for a variety of rhetori- 
cal situations. Computer-assisted. Materials charge 
optional. Prerequisites: Junior/senior standing; ENG 239, 
246, 247, or 249 or consent instructor. 

352 SELECTED FIGURES IN 
GLOBAL LITERATURE 

3sem. hrs. 

Studies in literary figures, genres, or movements. May repeat 
if content different. Formerly SELECTED STUDIES IN 
WORLD LITERATURE. Prerequisites: ENG 100 with a grade 
of C or better, ENG 102, junior/senior standing; or consent 
instructor. 

353 TECHNICAL EDITING 
3 sem. hrs. 

Theory and practice of editing and management of docu- 
mentation in industry and other organizational settings. 
Computer assisted. Prerequisites: ENG 244 or COM 
166; junior/senior standing; or graduate status or consent 
of instructor. 




176 



English 



354 LITERARY PUBLISHING IN 
THEORY AND PRACTICE 

3 sem. hrs. 

Focus on issues that have shaped contemporary literary pub- 
lishing. Prerequisites: ENG 100 with a C or better, ENG 
102, junior/senior standing; or consent instructor. 

355 FORENSIC BIBLIOGRAPHY AND 
ARCHIVAL EDITING 

3 sem. hrs. 

History of print culture from orality to digital text; intro- 
duction to principles and practices of bibliographic investi- 
gation and scholarly editing. Prerequisites: ENG 100 with 
a C or better, ENG 102, junior/senior standing; or consent 
instructor. 

356 PROPOSAL WRITING IN THE ARTS 
AND HUMANITIES 

3 sem. hrs. 

Rhetorical and economic principles of proposal writing in 
the arts and humanities, including analyzing CFPs and 
researching and writing proposals. Prerequisites: C or bet- 
ter in ENG 246, 247, 248, or 249; Junior/senior standing or 
graduate standing or consent instructor. 

357 THEORIES OF CREATING 
WRITING GENESIS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Survey of theories creative writers explicitly and implicitly 
employ and consider. Includes editing, analysis, and writing 
of creative and theoretical texts. Prerequisites: B or better in 
any 200-level writing course; junior/senior standing; or grad- 
uate standing; or consent instructor. 

360 STUDIES IN WOMEN'S WRITING 
3 sem. hrs. 

Studies in and theories of women's writing. May repeat if 
content differs; maximum 6 hours. Formerly STUDIES IN 
WOMEN AND LITERATURE. Prerequisites: Junior/senior 
standing or consent instructor. 

365 MOVEMENTS AND PERIODS IN 

AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE 
AND CULTURE 

3 sem. hrs. 

Advanced critical study of major movements and periods in 
African- American literature. May repeat if content different. 
Prerequisites: ENG 100 with a C or better, ENG 102, 
junior/senior standing; or consent instructor. 

367 CREATIVE WRITING PEDAGOGY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Theory and practice of teaching creative writing at high 
school and university levels, including design of courses 
and assignments. Prerequisites: B or better in ENG 227 
and junior/senior standing; or graduate standing; or consent 
of instructor. 

370 STUDIES IN THE HISTORY OF 

LITERATURE FOR YOUNG PEOPLE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Advanced critical, chronological examination of literature 
for children and adolescents from folklore origins to 1945. 
May repeat if content different. Prerequisites: Junior/senior 
standing; ENG 1 70 or consent instructor. 



372 STUDIES IN CONTEMPORARY 
LITERATURE FOR YOUNG PEOPLE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Advanced critical examination of 20th and 2 1 st century liter- 
ature for children and young adults with emphasis on trends 
and research. May repeat if content different. Prerequisites: 
Junior/senior standing; ENG 1 70 or consent instructor. 

373 POETRY FOR CHILDREN 
3 sem. hrs. 

Poetry for children and early adolescents, including various 
categories, elements, and well-known poets in the field. 
May repeat if content different; maximum 6 hours. Formerly 
VERSE FOR CHILDREN. Prerequisites: Junior/senior 
standing; ENG 1 70 or consent instructor. 

374 STORYTELLING 
3 sem. hrs. 

The art of storytelling based on knowledge of folklore her- 
itage with experiences in oral transmission of literature in a 
variety of settings. Prerequisites: Junior/senior standing or 
consent instructor. 

375 YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Advanced critical examination of literature for young adults 
with emphasis on trends and research. May repeat if content 
different. Formerly STUDIES IN LITERATURE FOR ADO- 
LESCENTS. Prerequisites: Junior/senior standing or consent 
instructor. 

378 SHAKESPEARE ON STAGE 
3 sem. hrs. 

An intensive study of Shakespeare's plays in production. 
May repeat; maximum 6 hours. Also offered as THE 378. 
Prerequisites: C or better in ENG 100 and junior/senior 
standing or consent instructor. 

381 STUDIES IN LITERARY GENRES 
3 sem. hrs. 

Advanced study in one or more literary types or genre. May 
be repeated if content different. Prerequisites: ENG 100 
with a C or better, ENG 102, junior/senior standing; or con- 
sent instructor. 

382 LITERARY CRITICISM 
3 sem. hrs. 

Historical survey of selected texts in literary and critical 
theory from Plato to the present. Prerequisites: ENG 100 
with a C or better, ENG 102, junior/senior standing; or con- 
sent instructor. 

384 INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL THEORY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to the history and practice of cultural theory. 
Prerequisites: ENG 100 with a C or better, ENG 102, 
junior/senior standing; or consent instructor. 

386 THE EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY 
ENGLISH NOVEL 

3 sem. hrs. 

The English novel from its origins through the 18th century. 
Prerequisites: ENG 100 with a C or better, ENG 102, 
junior/senior standing; or consent instructor. 



English 



177 



387 THE NINETEENTH-CENTURY 
ENGLISH NOVEL 

3 sem. hrs. 

The English novel between 1800 and 1900. Prerequisites: 
ENG 100 with a C or better, ENG 102, junior/senior stand- 
ing; or consent instructor. 

388 THE TWENTIETH-CENTURY 
ENGLISH NOVEL 

3 sem. hrs. 

The English novel since 1900. Prerequisites: ENG 100 with a 
C or better, ENG 102, junior/senior standing; or consent 
instructor. 

390 RESEARCH STUDIES IN LANGUAGE ARTS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Critical study of current practice and research in language 
arts and language development. Prerequisites: Junior/senior 
standing or consent instructor. 

391 SURVEY OF CLASSICAL RHETORIC 
3 sem. hrs. 

Rhetorical theories from ancient Greece to 1900, emphasiz- 
ing Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, and Quintilian. Prerequisites: 
ENG 100 with a C or better, ENG 102 and 283; junior/senior 
standing; or consent instructor. 

392 MODERN THEORIES OF RHETORIC 
3 sem. hrs. 

Study of the principles of rhetoric to serve as basis for under- 
standing contemporary rhetorical theories. Prerequisites: 
ENG 100 with a C or better, ENG 102 and 283, 
junior/senior standing; or consent instructor. 



394 TESOL PRACTICUM 
1-6 sem. hrs. 

Observation, case studies, tutoring, instructional assistance, 
and some teaching experience in English as a Second Lan- 
guage. Prerequisite: ENG 345. 

395 PROBLEMS IN THE TEACHING OF ENGLISH 
3 sem. hrs. 

Theory and practice in the teaching of language, literature, 
and composition at the secondary and community college 
levels. May repeat if topic differs. Prerequisites: ENG 100 
with a C or better, ENG 102, junior/senior standing; or 
consent instructor or experience in teaching (student teach- 
ing acceptable). 

396 THE WRITING SEMINAR 
3 sem. hrs. 

Concentration upon a major writing project and the formula- 
tion of an individual Writing Portfolio. Prerequisites: ENG 
246, 247, or 249, or graduate standing or consent instructor. 
Junior/senior standing. 

398 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 
INTERNSHIP IN ENGLISH 
1-6 sem. hrs. 

Supervised field experience in English with local, 
state, national, and international businesses, agencies, 
institutions (including colleges and universities), 
and organizations. May repeat; maximum 6 hours toward 
major/minor; maximum 16 hours toward graduation. Prereq- 
uisite: Consent instructor. 



178 







i 



GEOGRAPHY-GEOLOGY 
(GEO) 440 

206 Felmley Hall, (309) 438-7649 
Web address: Geo.IUinoisState.edu 

Chairperson: David Malone. 

Tenured/Tenure-track Faculty: 

Professors: Day, Malone, Sublett. 

Associate Professors: Budikova, Nelson, Peterson, Van der 

Hoven. 

Assistant Professors: Dunn, Haas, Kostelnick, Thayn, Zin- 

tambila. 

General Department Information 

INTERDISCIPLINARY MINORS 

The Department of Geography-Geology participates in 
interdisciplinary minors at the University. Course work 
offered by the Department contributes to the Minor in Urban 
Studies. For further information on these minors and their 
advisors, please consult the University-Wide Curriculum 
section of this Undergraduate Catalog. 

HONORS IN GEOGRAPHY-GEOLOGY 

The Department of Geography-Geology invites quali- 
fied Geography and Geology majors to distinguish them- 
selves by earning Honors through approved course work 
and independent study. Students who enroll in the Honors 
program will have the opportunity to work closely with 
selected faculty. Those students who complete the 
requirements will graduate with Departmental Honors— 
which will be indicated on their transcript and diploma. 

Admissions Requirements: 

Students majoring in the Geography-Geology Depart- 
ment may be admitted to the Departmental Honors Pro- 
gram if they have (1) completed at least 45 hours of 
college-level courses, (2) a cumulative GPA of 3.30 and at 
least 3.50 in the major, and (3) are a member of the Univer- 
sity Honors Program. 

Honors Study Requirements: 

In order to graduate with honors in the Geography-Geol- 
ogy Department, a student must complete (1) all university 
graduation requirements, (2) all regular requirements for the 
major, (3) at least 12 hours of Honors work in the major, 
including at least 3 hours of Honors Independent Study 
(GEO 299) with the other 9 hours distributed among in- 
course honors in Geography for Geography majors or Geol- 
ogy for Geology majors, (4) maintain a cumulative GPA of 
at least 3.30 and at least 3.50 in the major, and (5) apply to 
the Honors Office during the first month of the graduation 
semester for Honors Degree designation. 



Geography-Geology 179 

Geography Programs 

Degrees Offered: B.A., B.S. 

MAJOR IN GEOGRAPHY 

Programs must be planned in consultation with the program 
advisor. 

Advisor: Jill Freund Thomas (309) 438-8403 

— Minimum of 50 hours required. All Geography majors 
should consult with program advisor concerning appro- 
priate elective coursework in related fields. The faculty 
also recommends that students consider National Stu- 
dent Exchange and Study Abroad programs as a means 
of experiencing different cultural settings. 

— Required courses: GEO 100, 140, 204, 205, 238, 300, 
303, 315, 398; 2 courses from GEO 135, 215, 220, 
245; 250, or 306; 15 hours 200-300 level Geography 
courses. 

Teacher Certification Sequence: 

Advisor: Jill Freund Thomas (309) 438-8403 

— Minimum of 52 hours required. Part of entitlement pro- 
gram leading to certification: secondary 6-12. Student 
must plan program in consultation with an advisor. 

— Required courses: GEO 100, 135, 140, 204, 205, 300, 
303, 307, 315; 3 hours from GEO 215, 220, 235, 240, 
250, 265, or 306; 9 hours 200-300 level Geography 
courses. 

— Supporting courses required (16 hours): HIS 101 or 102, 
135 or 136; SOC 106; POL 101 or 106; ECO 105. 

— NOTE: To qualify for certification, the student must 
complete the Professional Education requirements and 
the General Education requirements as described in the 
Teacher Education Requirements-High School section 
of this Undergraduate Catalog. 

— NOTE: Students desiring Middle School or Junior High 
employment should also complete C&I 233 and PSY 302. 

— NOTE: Teacher certification students must present a 
2.50 GPA to qualify for placement in student teaching 
and to graduate with a teacher certification degree. 

MINOR IN GEOGRAPHY 

— 2 1 hours in Geography required. 

— Required courses: GEO 100, 135 or 140; GEO 204. 

MINOR IN GEOGRAPHY 
For Teacher Education: 

— 24 hours in Geography required. 

— Required courses: GEO 100, 135 or 140; GEO 204, 307. 

NOTE: Under current legislation, students earning an ini- 
tial secondary certificate may add an additional endorse- 
ment in another content area by completing 24 hours in that 
content area and passing the appropriate certification test. 



180 



Geography-Geology 



Endorsement requirements may have changed since publi- 
cation of this catalog. Check with your advisor. 

The Minor in Geography for Teacher Education does 
not lead directly to teacher certification. Students seeking 
an additional teaching endorsement in this academic area 
should contact their advisor or the Illinois State Board of 
Education Web site (www.isbe.net) for specific certifica- 
tion requirements. 

MINOR IN ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES 

Advisor: Dr. Amy M. Bloom 

Department of Geography- Geology 

432 Felmley Hall Annex, Campus Box 4400 

(309) 438-81 15; ambloom@ilstu.edu 

Web address: www.environmentalstudies.ilstu.edu 

The Minor in Environmental Studies is a multidisci- 
plinary program that is available to students in any under- 
graduate major. The mission of the Environmental 
Studies Minor Program is to increase awareness of the 
interrelationships that exist between humans and the nat- 
ural environment. Students will broaden their understand- 
ing of environmental issues as well as connections 
between human-made and natural environments. Knowl- 
edge and skills acquired through the program will help 
prepare students for further academic studies or for an 
environment-related career. Students should plan their 
minor program with the assistance of the Environmental 
Studies advisor. 

— Minimum of 25 hours required. 

— Required courses: GEO 100 and 205. 

— Choose 3 courses from: AGR 157, 203, 234; BSC 196, 
201 or 202, 212, 222, 223, 337, 375, 376, 378, 379; 
CHE 280; GEO 207, 211, 276, 341, 344, 361, 380; HSC 
257; PHY 207. 

- Choose 3 courses from: ECO 255; ENG 249; GEO 303, 
334; HIS 240; HSC 156; PHI 236, 250; POL 232, 236, 
254; SOC 330, 362. 

— Students may choose to pursue one environmentally- 
based independent study or one environmentally-based 
internship to fulfill up to 3 credits toward the minor. 
Prior approval of the Advisor of the Minor in Environ- 
mental Studies is required for the student to receive cred- 
it for this experience toward fulfilling the requirements 
for the minor. Arrangement for supervision of the intern- 
ship experience must be handled through the student's 
major department. 

NOTE: No more than 9 hours may be selected from the 
student's major department. 

CLINICAL EXPERIENCES IN TEACHER EDUCATION 

Clinical Experiences are provided in off-campus clini- 
cal teaching centers, in local schools and in campus labora- 
tory schools, in agencies and other approved non-school 
settings. All students will show verification of having com- 
pleted pre-student teaching field experiences commensu- 



rate with attaining local, state, and national standards. Stu- 
dents must provide their own transportation to Clinical 
Experience sites. 

The approximate number of clinical hours and type of 
activity associated with each course offering can be found 
with the appropriate course description. The following 
legend relates to the type and kind of activity related to a 
specific course. 

Clinical Experiences Legend 



1. 


Observation 


2. 


Tutoring one-on-one contact 


3. 


Non-instruction assisting 


4. 


Instructional aiding a group 


5. 


Micro teaching 


6. 


Simulation lab exercises 


7. 


Work with clinic client 


8. 


Graduate practicum 


9. 


Professional meeting 


10 


Other 



Geology Programs 

Degrees Offered: B.S. 
MAJOR IN GEOLOGY 

Traditional Sequence: 

Advisor: Dr. David Malone 
Phone:(309)438-2692 

— 40 hours in Geology required. 

— Required courses: GEO 202, 203, 280, 285, 290, 295, 
296, 395 and one of the following applied quantitative 
courses: GEO 360, 361, 362, or 364. 

— Required interdisciplinary courses: PHY 108 and 109 
(or 110 and 111); CHE 140 or equivalent, and 141; 
MAT 145 and 146. 

— Strongly recommended: GEO 385. 

Earth and Space Science Sequence for Teacher Certification: 

Advisor: Jill Freund Thomas 
Phone: (309)438-8403 

— 57 hours in Geology, Geography, Physics, Chemistry, 
and Biological Sciences required. 

— Required courses: GEO 100, 202, 203, 280, 285, 295 
and 307. 

— Required interdisciplinary courses: CHE 140; PHY 108, 
205, 310; BSC 196 or 197; two of the following CHE 
141, PHY 109, and BSC 197 (if not taken to satisfy the 
requirement); and 5-6 credit hours selected from upper 
division GEO science courses. 

— NOTE: to qualify for certification, the student must 
complete the Professional Education and General Edu- 
cation requirements as described in the Teacher Educa- 
tion Requirements-High School section of this 
Undergraduate Catalog. 



Geography-Geology 



181 



— NOTE: Students desiring Middle School or Junior 
High employment should also complete C&I 233 and 
PSY 302. 

— NOTE: Teacher certification students must present a 
2.50 GPA to qualify for placement in student teaching 
and to graduate with a teacher certification degree. 

MINOR IN GEOLOGY 

— 22 hours in Geology required. 

- Required courses: GEO 102, 202 and 203. 

— NOTE: Students wishing to minor in Geology are 
requested to inform the Department of their intention 
and to discuss their program with a Geology advisor. 



Geography Courses 



100 EARTH SYSTEMS SCIENCE 
4 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to geographic perspectives on Earth's dynam- 
ic systems. The atmosphere weather, climate, water, rocks, 
landforms, soils, and ecosystems are discussed. Lecture 
and lab. Formerly EARTH SCIENCE. 

130 THE TRAVELER'S WORLD 
3 sem. hrs. 

Cultural, physical, and economic aspects of the tourism 
industry in the United States and worldwide. Orientation 
to the industry as a career option. 

135 WORLD GEOGRAPHY OC-SS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Regional studies of the peoples, languages, religions, eco- 
nomic activities, and settlement patterns of the world. 

138 QUANTITATIVE REASONING 

IN THE GEOSCIENCES MC-QR 

3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to modern techniques used to visualize and ana- 
lyze quantitative data in the geosciences. May not be taken 
under the CT/NC option. Not for credit if had ECO 138, 
POL 138, PSY 138, or MQM 100. Prerequisites: MAT 120 
or 130 or 145, or consent instructor. 

140 HUMAN GEOGRAPHY MC-IS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to human geography emphasizing global prob- 
lems, patterns, and distributions. May not be taken under the 
CT/NC option. Prerequisites: ENG 101 or COM 110 or 
concurrent registration. 

200 PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY I 
3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to geographic perspectives on the atmosphere 
and biosphere with emphasis on climatic patterns and rela- 
tionships with vegetation and human activities. 

201 PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY II 

3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to geographic perspectives on the lithosphere and 
hydrosphere with emphasis on water balance. Prerequisite: 
GEO 200. 



204 DOING GEOGRAPHY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to geographical methodology and techniques 
with an emphasis on development of skills in analyzing 
spatial data. Formerly GEOGRAPHIC TECHNIQUES. Pre- 
requisite: 9 hours Geography. 

205 LIVING IN THE ENVIRONMENT 
3 sem. hrs. 

The human interactions with the natural environment. 
Emphasizes soil, wildlife, forest, mineral and fuel, water 
and air conservation. Formerly GLOBAL ENVIRONMEN- 
TAL ISSUES. Prerequisites: Completion of 45 semester hours 
or equivalent or consent instructor. 

207 NATURAL DISASTERS OC-SMT 
3 sem. hrs. 

Science of earth-related natural disasters: occurrences, caus- 
es, effects, prediction, prevention, mitigation, related human 
activity and classic examples. Two 1-hour lectures; one 2- 
hour discussion/lab per week. Not for credit Geology or 
Geography majors. 

208 POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to the field of political geography. Emphasis on 
spatial patterns of political activity. Prerequisites: Comple- 
tion of 45 semester hours or equivalent or consent instructor. 

211 EARTHS DYNAMIC WEATHER OC-SMT 
3 sem. hrs. 

Dynamic aspects of weather and climate from global to local 
scales with emphasis on how we gather, analyze, and under- 
stand weather information. Formerly GEO 110. Not for 
credit Geography major. 

215 UNITED STATES 
3 sem. hrs. 

Major regions of the United States in terms of contemporary 
physical, cultural, and natural resource patterns. Prerequi- 
sites: Completion of 45 semester hours or equivalent or con- 
sent instructor. 

220 ILLINOIS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Boundaries, physical setting, environment concerns, pat- 
terns of human occupance, regional characteristics. Pre- 
requisites: Completion of 45 semester hours or equivalent 
or consent instructor. 

235 GEOGRAPHY OF 

EMERGING AREAS OC-SS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Current cultural realities of major emerging geographic 
regions are examined in light of how they affect geogra- 
phy and how geography affects the cultures. Regions vary 
in different sections. Prerequisites: Inner Core and MC- 
IS category. 

238 QUANTITATIVE METHODS IN 
GEOGRAPHY I 
3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to uni-variate parametric statistical methods 
routinely used by geographers. Prerequisites: GEO 204 or 
concurrent registration or consent instructor. 



182 



Geography-Geology 



250 AFRICA 
3 sem. hrs. 

Regional study of Africa. Patterns of society as related to the 
natural environment. Prerequisites: Completion of 45 
semester hours or equivalent or consent instructor. 

265 OUR NATIONAL PARKS 
3 sem. hrs. 

National Parks of the United States in terms of physiogra- 
phy, geology, climate, flora, fauna, and scenic qualities. Pre- 
requisites: Completion of 45 semester hours or equivalent or 
consent instructor. 

298.01 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: INTERNSHIP 
IN ENVIRONMENTAL GEOGRAPHY 
1-3 sem. hrs. 

Planned, supervised, paid or unpaid professional practice in 
environmental geography with a public or private organiza- 
tion. Maximum of 3 semester hours credit toward the Minor 
in Environmental Studies; 40 hours internship per semester 
hour credit. Prerequisites: Prior approval by Minor in Envi- 
ronmental Studies Advisor or Geography-Geology Depart- 
ment Chair. Advanced arrangements required. 

300 CARTOGRAPHY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Theory and techniques regarding graphic representation of 
statistical data, including compilation, drafting, and repro- 
duction of various types of thematic maps. Drafting supplies 
required. Prerequisites: GEO 204. Junior/senior standing. 

303 GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Fundamental principles of geographic information systems; 
emphasis on raster and vector based systems and their appli- 
cations to spatial analysis. Prerequisites: GEO 204 or con- 
sent instructor. 

304 GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION 
SYSTEMS APPLICATIONS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Advanced applications in geographic information systems 
(GIS) with an emphasis on problem-solving, advanced GIS 
analysis techniques, and a survey of raster and vector based 
GIS software and data bases. Prerequisites: GEO 303 
required; MAT 1 20 recommended. 

305 REMOTE SENSING I 
3 sem. hrs. 

Basic principles of remote sensing, image interpretation, 
photogrammetry, and digital image processing. Prerequi- 
sites: GEO 204, 238, or consent instructor. 

306 REGIONAL AND AREA STUDIES 
1-9 sem. hrs. 

Intensive on-site study of particular lands, environments, 
cultures, and peoples. Field work required. Prerequisite: 
Consent instructor. 

307 TEACHING GEOGRAPHY/EARTH SCIENCE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Approaches to the teaching of geography and earth sci- 
ence in grades 6-12. Includes Clinical Experiences: 35 
hours, Type 1-6, 10. Prerequisites: Teaching major only. 
Admission to Professional Studies. C or better C&I 216 
or PSY 215 or concurrent registration. 8 hours of Geogra- 
phy or Geology. 



308 QUANTITATIVE METHODS 
IN GEOGRAPHY II 
3 sem. hrs. 

Use and interpretation of basic statistical techniques in geo- 
graphical problems. Formerly QUANTITATIVE METHODS 
IN GEOGRAPHY. Prerequisites: GEO 238; MAT 120 or 
higher recommended. 

310 FIELD GEOGRAPHY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Techniques for the systematic acquisition and interpretation 
of geographic field data. Includes introduction to Orienteer- 
ing. Prerequisites: 9 hours Geography and fieldwork. 

312 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW 
3 sem. hrs. 

Overview of environmental law, emphasis on land and 
water. Covers legal operations, procedures, and theories. 
Prerequisites: GEO 205 or consent of instructor. 

313 ENERGY AND SUSTAINABILITY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Human geographic study of energy, covering political, eco- 
nomic, environmental, and societal aspects of energy. 
Includes sustainability and energy security. Prerequisites: 
GEO 205 or consent of instructor. 

315 SEMINAR IN GEOGRAPHY 

3 sem. hrs. 

Designed to acquaint the student with career opportuni- 
ties in geography and in related fields. Includes senior 
field problem. Prerequisites: GEO 204, 300, 303. 

331 CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY 
3 sem. hrs. 

An advanced course in the field and methodology of cul- 
tural geography, with an emphasis on the study of place 
and culture in a globalizing world. Field trip required. Pre- 
requisites: GEO 140 or consent instructor. 

334 POLITICAL ECOLOGY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Critical examination of how socio-political and economic 
systems, processes, and practices are linked globally with 
contemporary environmental problems. Formerly 389.32. 
Prerequisite: GEO 205 or consent instructor. 

336 URBAN GEOGRAPHY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Internal morphology, external relationships, and other spatial 
aspects of cities. Prerequisites: Junior/senior standing. 

339 MEDICAL GEOGRAPHY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Investigates the major research themes in medical geogra- 
phy, including health-environment interactions, spatial pat- 
terns and analysis, and health care systems. Prerequisites: 
GEO 204 or consent instructor. 

341 CLIMATE AND GLOBAL 

ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE 

3 sem. hrs. 

An overview of concepts, methods, theory and debates 
surrounding climate and global environmental change. 
Prerequisites: GEO 100 or consent instructor. 



344 BIOGEOGRAPHY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Theory and application of the geographic distributions of 
plants and animals and processes that cause these distribu- 
tions. Lecture and lab. Prerequisites: GEO 100 or consent 
instructor. 

346 APPLIED CLIMATOLOGY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Practical applications of climatology. Collection of primary 
and secondary climate data, and analysis and interpretation 
of climate data. Prerequisites: GEO 100 or consent of 
instructor. Course in statistics recommended. 

351 CARTOGRAPHIC PROCESSES 
3 sem. hrs. 

Advanced techniques in design, production and reproduc- 
tion of maps. Materials charge optional. Prerequisite: A or 
B in GEO 300. 

370 URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING 
3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to the planning process and the major ele- 
ments used in plan implementation such as zoning regula- 
tions, subdivision regulations, and the official map. Field 
research may be required. Prerequisite: GEO 204 or con- 
sent instructor. 

398.01 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 
INTERNSHIP IN GEOGRAPHY 
1-16 sem. hrs. 

Planned, supervised professional experience in a public or 
private organization. The experience provides an intro- 
duction to a career in geography. May be paid. Maximum 
4 hours credit toward GEO major; 40 hours intern/credit 
hour. Prerequisites: 100 hours completed; 2.20 GPA; 
GEO 315; and consent department chair. Advance 
arrangements required. 



Geology Courses 



IC-NS 



102 PRINCIPLES OF GEOLOGY 

3 sem. hrs. 

Examination of the principles of geology and the tectonic, 
rock, hydrologic, and geomorphic cycles in terms of 
assumptions, forces, products, and consequences. Lecture 
and lab. Not for credit major/minor. Not for credit if had 
GEO 105. May not be taken under the CT/NC option. 

202 EVOLUTION OF THE EARTH OC-SMT 
3 sem. hrs. 

Physical, chemical, and biologic evolution of the earth sys- 
tem as interpreted from rock sequences, fossils, and maps. 
Emphasis on geologic methodology. 

203 MINERALS, ROCKS, F 
OSSILS AND MAPS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Mineral, rock and fossil identification and interpretation; 
recognition and interpretation of structures and surface 
features from geologic and topographic maps. Lecture and 
lab. Prerequisites: IC-NS or IC-NS A course; GEO 202 or 
consent registration. 



Geography-Geology 183 

276 ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY 

3 sem. hrs. 

Recognition of geologic hazards such as earthquakes and 
floods. Evaluation of geologic resources and the legal and geo- 
logic limitation of resource utilization. Prerequisites: Comple- 
tion of 45 semester hours or equivalent or consent instructor. 

280 MINERALOGY 

4 sem. hrs. 

Crystallography, internal structure, chemistry, recognition 
and occurrence of minerals. Lecture and lab. Prerequisites: 
GEO 203; CHE 140. 

285 IGNEOUS AND METAMORPHIC 
PETROLOGY 
4 sem. hrs. 

Description, classification, and origin of igneous and meta- 
morphic rocks. Lecture and lab. Field trip required. Prereq- 
uisite: GEO 280. 

290 STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY 
4 sem. hrs. 

Mechanics and processes of deformation of the earth's 
crust and the resulting structures. Lecture and lab. Field 
trip required. Prerequisite: GEO 203 required; MAT 
144 recommended. 

295 SEDIMENTOLOGY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Origin, transportation, deposition, and diagenesis of sedi- 
mentary materials with emphasis on classification of sedi- 
mentary rocks. Lecture and lab. Field trip required. 
Formerly SEDIMENTOLOGY AND STRA TIGRAPHY I. 
Prerequisite: GEO 203. 

296 STRATIGRAPHY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Distribution, correlation and analysis of stratified rocks. 
Lecture and lab. Field trip required. Formerly SEDIMEN- 
TOLOGY AND STRATIGRAPHY II. Prerequisites: GEO 
203, 295. 

298.20 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 
COOP/INTERN IN GEOLOGY 
1-4 sem. hrs. 

Planned, supervised, paid or unpaid professional practice in 
geology or geotechnical field with government or private 
organization. Maximum 4 hours toward B.S. degree in Geol- 
ogy. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

360 GROUNDWATER GEOLOGY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Groundwater occurrence and movement, aquifer evaluation, 
field and lab measurements, contamination and other appli- 
cations. Field trips. Prerequisites: GEO 203 and MAT 146. 

361 HYDROLOGY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to hydrology, including all components of the 
hydrologic cycle, field and lab measurements, data acquisi- 
tion, and quantitative problem solving. Three Saturday field 
trips required. Prerequisite: MAT 145 or consent instructor. 

362 ENGINEERING GEOLOGY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Engineering applications of geology, construction problems 
of geologic origin and their engineering solutions. Field trips 
required. Prerequisites: GEO 203; MAT 146; and PHY 108 
or consent instructor. 




184 



Geography-Geology; History 



364 EXPLORATION GEOPHYSICS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Principles of exploration geophysics and the techniques that 
are used to study subsurface environments. Subjects 
reviewed include: stress and strain, information theory, seis- 
mic, gravity, magnetics, electrical resistivity, electromagnet- 
ic conductivity, ground penetrating RADAR, and borehole 
logging. Prerequisites: GEO 203; MAT 146; and PHY 108; 
or consent instructor. 

380 GEOMORPHOLOGY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Origin, classification, description, and interpretation of land- 
forms. Field trips. Prerequisites: GEO 100 or 102. 

381 PLANETARY GEOLOGY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Planets, satellites, and materials that make up our solar sys- 
tem, including how they are studied, their composition, 
structure, and physiography. Prerequisites: GEO 202 and 
203 or consent of instructor. 

382 GLACIAL AND QUATERNARY GEOLOGY 

3 sem. hrs. 

Development of glaciers, glacial movements, deposits, and 
landforms as background for discussion of present land- 
scapes. Field trips required. Prerequisites: GEO 100 or 102. 

385 INVERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY 

4 sem. hrs. 

Examination and analysis of major fossil invertebrate 
phyla; emphasis on groups with paleoecologic and strati- 
graphic significance. Lecture and lab. Field trip required. 
Prerequisite: GEO 203 required. BSC 196 recommended. 

395 FIELD GEOLOGY 
6 sem. hrs. 

Application of geologic principles to field mapping and 
interpretation in the Black Hills and Central Rocky Moun- 
tains. Prerequisites: GEO 280, 285, 290, 295, and 296. 



HISTORY (HIS) 

301 Schroeder Hall, (309) 438-5641 
Web address: Hlstory.IllinoisState.edu 



442 



Chairperson: Anthony Crubaugh. 
Tenured/Tenure-track Faculty: 

Professors: Biles, Lessoff, Perez. 

Associate Professors: Adedze, Ciani, Clemens, Clemmons, 

Crubaugh, Hughes, Kennedy, Nassar, Olsen, Reed, 

Winger. 

Assistant Professors: Hartman, Noraian, Paehler, Soderlund, 

Tsouvala, Varga-Harris, Wood. 

General Department Information 

INTERDISCIPLINARY MINORS 

The Department of History participates in a number of 
interdisciplinary minors at the University. Course work 
offered by the Department contributes to the following 
minors: African Studies; African-American Studies; Latin 
American, Caribbean, and Latino/a Studies; Middle Eastern 
and South Asian Studies; Native American Studies; and 
Urban Studies. For further information on these minors and 



their advisors, please consult the University- Wide Curricu- 
lum section of this Undergraduate Catalog. 

HONORS IN HISTORY 

Honors work in the Department of History has been 
designed to offer to qualified undergraduates the opportu- 
nity to develop an independent, individualized program of 
study while working closely with departmental faculty in 
the field of their special interest. 

Admission Requirements: 

To be admitted to the Honors Program, students must 
have at least sophomore standing, have taken nine hours in 
history, and have a minimum GPA of 3.50 in History. 
Recommendation of at least one member of the departmen- 
tal faculty is required as is the approval of the departmental 
Honors Director. Students may also be invited to apply by a 
faculty member. In specific cases these requirements may be 
waived but only with the express approval of the Honors 
Director and the History Department Chairperson. 

Honors Study Requirements: 

Students in the Honors Program will complete a mini- 
mum of 9 hours of Honors-level work. The following 
requirements constitute the minimum program: 

A. History 296: Historiography and Historical Method (3 
hours.) Consent of instructor required; 3.50 GPA in Histo- 
ry; Majors only. This class serves as a foundation for 
honors work. A student in the University Honors Pro- 
gram may arrange with the Honors Program Office for 
this course to count as the Honors participation 
requirement for continuation of that program. 

B. History 299: Independent Honors Study (Honors, 3 
hours.) 296 or concurrent registration required; 
admission to departmental honors program; consent 
of department. This course gives students the oppor- 
tunity to work with an individual faculty member to 
devise and research a project of the student's choice. 
Students will begin drafting the honors thesis in 
preparation for History 301. 

C. History 301: Honors Thesis (Honors, 3 hours.) HIS 296 
and 299; admission to department honors program; con- 
sent of department. HIS 301 can be counted for the His- 
tory 300 SENIOR SEMINAR major required. Cannot 
be taken CR/NC. Formerly HIS 294. The course pro- 
vides the student with the opportunity to complete the 
writing of the honors thesis and to present a summary of 
the thesis at a public forum or defend the thesis before 
relevant faculty. 

GRADUATION WITH HONORS 

To graduate with Honors in the Department of History 
the student will be expected to complete the program out- 
lined above and to maintain grades in departmental subjects 
so as to finish with an overall History average of 3.50. The 
Director of Departmental Honors and the History Depart- 
ment Chairperson will regularly evaluate students in the pro- 
gram. Any student whose work does not meet the minimal 
standards of the program will not be allowed to continue. 



History 



185 



History Programs 

Degrees Offered: B.A., B.S. 
MAJOR IN HISTORY 



Admission to the History major, including the History- 
Social Sciences Teacher Certification Sequence, may be 
restricted by the lack of available Department resources. 

The Department of History encourages students seeking 
bachelor's degrees to develop both global and multidiscipli- 
nary approaches to the study of history and to apply these 
methods to their studies in other disciplines. To develop their 
skills of historical analysis and to learn to think critically 
about historical accounts, students complete HIS 200 and 
300. To acquire both a well-rounded and a global under- 
standing of historical processes, students are required to take 
6 hours each in the 3 fields of European, non- Western, and 
United States History. 

The Department of History recognizes the value of lan- 
guage to the study of history from a global perspective. For 
this reason, the department recommends all students major- 
ing in history complete a Bachelor of Arts program. Those 
students majoring in history but choosing to pursue a Bache- 
lor of Sciences program must complete a minor program. 

B.A. students are encouraged to improve their career 
opportunities by minoring in another discipline. B.A. stu- 
dents not opting for a minor must choose an area of concen- 
tration by taking a minimum of 9 hours in any field other 
than history or foreign language; at least 3 of these hours 
must be in 200- or 300-level courses. B.A. students are 
encouraged to continue their language studies beyond the' 12 
hours required by the Bachelor of Arts. 

B.A. and B.S. students in either the History (non-teach- 
ing) or History-Social Sciences Teacher Certification 
Sequence must complete or be concurrently enrolled in 
HIS 200 before enrolling in any other 200-level History 
course and must complete HIS 200 before enrolling in any 
300-level History course. HIS 300 is a capstone course to 
be taken in the student's last full semester on campus. For 
students in the History-Social Sciences Teacher Certifica- 
tion Sequence, this would be the semester just prior to stu- 
dent teaching. 

Students must fulfill the following requirements: 
Major in History, B.A. 

— 36 hours in History required. 

— Required courses: HIS 101, 102, 135, 136, 200, 300; 6 
hours non-Western History listed in group 3 of "History 
Courses by Group for the Major." At least one of the 
non- Western electives must be at the senior level. 

— 21 hours at the upper-division level (includes HIS 200 
and 300). Of those 21 hours, 9 hours must be at the 300- 
level (includes HIS 300). HIS 200 is a prerequisite/co- 
requisite for all other 200-level and prerequisite for all 
300-level History courses. 



— Students must choose one of the following courses as an 
elective: HIS 104, 111, 1 12, or 131. 

— Students are encouraged to complete a minor; but, if 
a minor is not selected, they must complete a 9-hour 
concentration in any field other than history or for- 
eign language, with at least 3 hours at the upper-divi- 
sion level. 

Major in History, B.S. 

— Requirements same as for B.A., except that students 
must complete a minor. 

History-Social Sciences Teacher Certification Sequence: 

— 42 hours in History required. 

— Required courses: HIS 101, 102, 135, 136, 200, 290, 
300, 390; 3 hours upper-division United States Histo- 
ry (in addition to HIS 135 and 136) listed in Group 2 
and 6 hours of non-Western History listed in Group 3 
of "History Courses by Group for the Major." At least 
one of the non-Western electives must be at the 
senior level. 

— 27 hours at the upper-division level (includes HIS 200, 
290, 300, and 390), including 12 hours at the 300-level 
(includes HIS 300 and 390). HIS 200 is a prerequisite 
for all other 300-level History courses. 

— Students must complete a 16-hour interdisciplinary area 
including ECO 105; POL 101 or 105 or 106; GEO 135 
or 140; ANT 175 or 185; and SOC 106 or 108. 

— The Teacher Certification Sequence is part of the entitle- 
ment program leading to secondary History-Social Sci- 
ences certification. 

— A 3.00 GPA in the major and overall is required for 
admission to Professional Studies and Student Teaching. 
Deadlines for admission to Professional Studies and Stu- 
dent Teaching are available from the Center for Teacher 
Education. 

History Courses by Group for the Major: 

Group 1: Methods and Topics: HIS 268, 270, 274, 290, 
292, 296, 301, 330, 390, 394, 395, 398. 

Group 2: United States History: HIS 11 1, 112, 131, 216, 
217, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249, 
253, 254, 256, 257, 258, 259. 261, 262, 273, 278, 279, 309, 
310, 31 1, 315, 320, 321, 322, 323, 324, 327, 329. 

Group 3: Non-Western History: HIS 104.01, 104.02, 
104.03, 104.04, 104.05, 104.06, 263, 264, 265, 266, 269, 

271, 272, 275, 276, 282, 283, 307, 351, 373, 375, 378. 

Group 4: European History: HIS 219, 220, 221, 222, 
223, 224, 225, 228, 229, 230, 231, 232, 233, 234, 235, 237, 
308, 335, 342, 345, 355, 356, 357, 366. 

MINOR IN HISTORY 

— 21 hours in History required; at least 12 hours in 200- or 
300-level courses. 

— Required courses: 6 hours each in Group 2: United 
States, Group 3: Non- Western, and Group 4: European 
History (see listing under "History Courses by Group 
for the Minor." 



186 History 

MINOR IN HISTORY 

For Teacher Education: 

- 21 hours in History required; at least 12 hours in 200- or 
300-level courses. 
— Required courses: 9 hours in Group 2: United States, 
6 hours in Group 3: Non- Western, and 6 hours in 
Group 4: European History (see listing under "His- 
tory Courses by Group for the Minor"); HIS 290 
recommended in addition to required courses; 
requirements for Teacher Certification in another 
major field must be met. 

The Minor in History for Teacher Education does not 
lead directly to teacher certification. Students seeking 
certification in History and the Social Sciences must 
complete a recognized secondary education program and 
at least 32 hours in the Social Sciences (12 hours in His- 
tory). In addition, students will be required to pass a 
Social Sciences content examination as administered by 
the state of Illinois. If a student has any questions he/she 
should contact their advisor or the Illinois State Board of 
Education Website (www.isbe.net) for specific certifica- 
tion requirements. 

History Courses by Group for the Minor: 

Group 1: Methods and Topics: HIS 200, 270, 274, 290, 
292, 296, 300, 301, 330, 390, 394, 395. 

Group 2: United States History: HIS 111, 112, 131, 135, 
136, 216, 217, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243, 244, 246, 247, 248, 
249, 253, 254, 256, 257, 258, 259, 261, 262, 278, 279, 309, 
310, 31 1, 315, 320, 322, 323, 324, 329. 

Group 3: Non-Western History: HIS 104.01, 104.02, 
104.03, 104.04, 104.05, 104.06, 263, 264, 265, 266, 269, 
271, 272, 275, 276, 282, 283, 307, 351, 373, 375, 378. 

Group 4: European History: HIS 101, 102, 219, 220, 221, 
222, 223, 224, 225, 228, 229, 230, 231, 232, 233, 234, 235, 
237, 308, 335, 345, 355, 356, 357, 366. 

CLINICAL EXPERIENCES 
IN TEACHER EDUCATION 

Clinical Experiences are provided in off-campus 
clinical teaching centers, in local schools and in campus 
laboratory schools, in agencies and in other approved 
non-school settings. All students will show verification 
of having completed pre-student teaching field experi- 
ences commensurate with attaining local, state, and 
national standards. Students must provide their own 
transportation to Clinical Experience sites. 

The approximate number of clinical hours and type 
of activity associated with each course offering can be 
found with the appropriate course description. The fol- 
lowing legend relates to the type and kind of activity 
related to a specific course. 

Clinical Experiences Legend 

1 . Observation 

2. Tutoring one-on-one contact 



3. 


Non-instruction assisting 


4. 


Instructional aiding a group 


5. 


Micro teaching 


6. 


Simulation lab exercises 


7. 


Work with clinic client 


8. 


Graduate practicum 


9. 


Professional meeting 


10. 


Other 



History Courses 

The Department attempts to offer its courses in the 
semesters indicated below. But because of changing fac- 
ulty availability, which cannot be foreseen before this 
Undergraduate Catalog is printed, the Department can- 
not guarantee that a given course will always be taught 
in a given semester or year. In planning their programs, 
students are therefore advised to consult departmental 
faculty and advisors concerning the availability of indi- 
vidual courses. 

101 WESTERN CIVILIZATION TO 1500 
3 sem. hrs. 

Western civilization from its beginnings in the ancient 
Near East until the Renaissance, emphasizing cultural and 
political history. 

102 MODERN WESTERN CIVILIZATION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Western civilization from the Renaissance to the present, 
emphasizing cultural and political history. 

104 HISTORY OF ASIA, MIDDLE EAST, 
AFRICA, LATIN AMERICA, OR 
INDIGENOUS PEOPLES OC-H 

3 sem. hrs. 

Interdisciplinary, thematic, and chronological examina- 
tion of the histories of Africa, Asia, Latin America, and 
indigenous peoples. Topics vary from one section to 
another. Topic .01 Africa; Topic .02 East-Asia; Topic .03 
Latin America; Topic .04 Middle East, .06 Native Ameri- 
cans. Not for credit if had HIS 103. Prerequisites: ENG 
101 and COM 110. 

107 THE MAKING OF EUROPE OC-H 

3 sem. hrs. 

Explores the formation of Europe as a distinct historical entity. 
Prerequisites: ENG 101 and COM 110. 

1 1 1 AMERICAN DIVERSITY: CONTESTED 
VISIONS OF THE UNITED STATES 
EXPERIENCE MC-UST 

3 sem. hrs. 

Study of major events in United States history from the 
perspectives of race, gender, ethnicity, and class. May 
not be taken under the CT/NC option. Also offered as 
SOC 111. Prerequisites: ENG 101 or COM 110 or con- 
current registration. 



History 



187 



112 AMERICAN FAMILY: CHANGE 

AND DIVERSITY MC-UST 

3 sem. hrs. 

Historical and comparative exploration of activities of fami- 
ly formation, maintenance, and reconfiguration in America. 
Emphasis on issues of diversity. May not be taken under the 
CT/NC option. Also offered as FCS/SOC 112. Prerequi- 
sites: ENG 101 or COM 1 10 or concurrent registration. 

131 AMERICAN CULTURE: TRADITIONS 
AND TEXTS MC-UST 

3 sem. hrs. 

Historical introduction to American culture through 
analysis of written texts and artifacts such as works of 
fine art. May not be taken under the CT/NC option. Also 
offered as ENG 131. Prerequisites: ENG 101 or COM 
1 10 or concurrent registration. 

135 HISTORY OF THE 
UNITED STATES TO 1865 
3 sem. hrs. 

Political, economic, social, and cultural developments from 
the colonial period to the Civil War. 

136 HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES 
SINCE 1865 

3 sem. hrs. 

Agrarian and industrial revolutions, development of Ameri- 
can institutions, and America as a world power. 

200 DOING HISTORY: AN INTRODUCTION 
3 sem. hrs. 

An introduction to the discipline, including study of research 
and writing techniques, historical methods, and the nature 
and varieties of history. Required of History and History- 
Social Sciences Education majors as a prerequisite/co-requi- 
site for all other 200-level and prerequisite for all 300-level 
History courses. Must be taken by students who begin at Illi- 
nois State University no later than the end of their sopho- 
more year, by transfer students by the end of the junior year, 
or with approval of the department chairperson. Prerequi- 
sites: History or History-Social Science Education major 
only; 1 5 hours college credit; consent department. 

216 AMERICAN RELIGIOUS HISTORY I 
3 sem. hrs. 

Part one of survey of religion in the context of U.S. history 
to 1865. 

217 AMERICAN RELIGIOUS HISTORY II 
3 sem. hrs. 

Part two of survey of religion in the context of U.S. history 
since 1865. 

219 GENDER IN MEDIEVAL 

AND EARLY MODERN EUROPE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Survey of the role of gender in Medieval and Early Modern 
European history. Prerequisites: HIS 101 and 102 or con- 
sent instructor. 

220 ANCIENT HISTORY: GREECE 

3 sem. hrs. 

Political and cultural evolution of the Greek World from pre- 
classical times to the Hellenistic Age. Prerequisites: HIS 
101 or 102 or consent instructor. 



221 ANCIENT HISTORY: ROME 
3 sem. hrs. 

The Roman republic and empire with emphasis on the con- 
stitutional evolution of Rome. Prerequisites: HIS 101 or 102 
or consent instructor. 

222 THE MIDDLE AGES: 395-1100 
3 sem. hrs. 

The disintegration of ancient civilization and the gradual 
emergence of three successor civilizations: Byzantium, the 
Muslim World, and Western Europe. Prerequisites: HIS 101 
or 102 or consent instructor. 

223 THE MIDDLE AGES: 1100-1500 
3 sem. hrs. 

The climax and decline of medieval civilization. Prerequi- 
sites: HIS 101 or 102 or consent instructor. 

224 THE RENAISSANCE: EUROPE: 1300-1500 
3 sem. hrs. 

Political, economic, social, intellectual, cultural transition to 
early modern Europe; spread of Renaissance from origins in 
Italy; exploration and discovery. 

225 THE REFORMATION: EUROPE: 1500-1600 
3 sem. hrs. 

Protestant and Catholic reformations in the setting of 16th- 
century politics, economics, society; intellectual and cultural 
currents; European expansion. 

228 EUROPE IN THE NINETEENTH 
CENTURY: 1815-1914 

3 sem. hrs. 

Liberalism, nationalism, democracy, militarism, imperial- 
ism, and the forces that led to World War I. 

229 EUROPE IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY 
3 sem. hrs. 

The origins of the World Wars, Marxism-Leninism, Nazi and 
Soviet totalitarianism, and the role of Europe in the Cold War. 

230 THE CONTEMPORARY WORLD 
3 sem. hrs. 

Major economic, social, political, and cultural changes since 
1945. The Cold War, the revolution in expectations, and the 
emerging concern over depletion of resources and environ- 
mental imbalances. 

231 ENGLISH HISTORY TO 1688 
3 sem. hrs. 

History of medieval and Tudor-Stuart England to the Revo- 
lution of 1688. 

232 ENGLISH HISTORY SINCE 1688 
3 sem. hrs. 

English history from the Glorious Revolution of 1688-89 to 
the present; political, social, and cultural history are 
emphasized. 

233 MEDIEVAL RUSSIA 
3 sem. hrs. 

Examination of life in Kievan Rus and Muscovy stressing 
their cultural contributions to European civilization. 

234 IMPERIAL RUSSIA 
3 sem. hrs. 

Analysis of the creation and maintenance of empire culmi- 
nating in Russia's Golden and Silver Ages. 



188 



History 



235 FRENCH HISTORY TO THE REVOLUTION 
3 sem. hrs. 

French history from the Middle Ages to the French Revo- 
lution with emphasis upon French culture, including 
social, intellectual, and artistic movements. 

237 MODERN GERMANY: 1848-PRESENT 
3 sem. hrs. 

Survey of German social, political, diplomatic, and intel- 
lectual history in the 19th and 20th centuries. 

239 HISTORY OF AMERICAN 
FOREIGN RELATIONS 

3 sem. hrs. 

The history of the foreign relations of the United States 
from the American Revolution to the present. Not for credit 
if had HIS 25 lor HIS 252. 

240 AMERICAN ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY 
3 sem. hrs. 

How people and the flora, fauna, climates, and natural 
landscapes of America have interacted and affected one 
another over time. Prerequisites: HIS 135 or 136 or con- 
sent instructor. 

241 COLONIAL LIFE AND INSTITUTIONS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Transfer of European ideas, institutions, and customs 
to America, and their subsequent development on American soil. 

242 HISTORY OF CHICAGO 
3 sem. hrs. 

A survey of Chicago's history from 1600 to the present. 

243 THE EARLY NATIONAL PERIOD: 1787-1815 
3 sem. hrs. 

Emphasis upon the establishment of a national government; 
the principles and influence of early federalism and of Jef- 
fersonian democracy. 

244 THE AGE OF JACKSON: 1815-1848 
3 sem. hrs. 

The awakening of American nationalism as typified by the 
economic, political, social, and cultural changes of the Jack- 
sonian period. Prerequisites: HIS 135, or equivalent, or con- 
sent instructor. 

246 CIVIL WAR AND 
RECONSTRUCTION: 1848-1877 
3 sem. hrs. 

Causes and process of secession, problems of the Lincoln 
and Davis administrations, conduct of the war, and the prob- 
lems of reconstruction. Prerequisites: HIS 135 or 136, or 
equivalent, or consent instructor. 

247 THE GILDED AGE IN AMERICA: 1877-1900 
3 sem. hrs. 

Industrialization and responses to industrialism in America; 
special attention given to business and political leaders, 
farmers, African-Americans, and writers. Prerequisite: HIS 
136 or consent instructor. 

248 UNITED STATES IN THE 
TWENTIETH CENTURY TO 1945 
3 sem. hrs. 

Significant aspects of American history from the Populist era 
to the end of World War II. 



249 UNITED STATES IN THE TWENTIETH 
CENTURY SINCE 1945 
3 sem. hrs. 

Significant aspects of American history from the 1945 to 
contemporary times. 

253 AMERICAN CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY 
3 sem. hrs. 

The history of American constitutional and legal develop- 
ments from the colonial period to the present. 

254 THE AMERICAN WEST 
3 sem. hrs. 

Development of the trans-Mississippi West, exploration to 
present. Emphasis upon land-human relationships and the 
roots of environmental concerns. Prerequisites: HIS 135 or 
136, or equivalent, or consent instructor. 

256 AMERICAN BUSINESS HISTORY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Industrialization of America; the problems of agriculture, 
monopoly, and labor; the role of government in regulating 
and guiding economic activity. Prerequisites: HIS 135 or 
136, or equivalent, or consent instructor. 

257 AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1865 
3 sem. hrs. 

The history of African Americans from Colonial times to 
the Civil War. 

258 AFRICAN-AMERICAN 
HISTORY SINCE 1865 
3 sem. hrs. 

The history of African Americans from the Reconstruction 
period to the present. 

259 HISTORY OF ILLINOIS 
3 sem. hrs. 

A survey of the history of Illinois from the time of the 
French explorers to the present. Prerequisites: HIS 135 or 
136 or consent instructor. 

261 HISTORY OF WOMEN IN THE 
UNITED STATES TO 1865 

3 sem. hrs. 

The role of women in the economic, social, political, and 
cultural history of America from the colonial period to the 
Civil War. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 

262 HISTORY OF WOMEN IN THE 
UNITED STATES SINCE 1865 

3 sem. hrs. 

The role of women in the economic, social, political, and 
cultural history of America from 1 865 to the present. Pre- 
requisite: Sophomore standing. 

263 MODERN MEXICO 
3 sem. hrs. 

Survey of Mexican history from the mid- 18th century. 

264 HISTORY OF WOMEN IN 

NORTH AMERICA OC-SS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to theoretical approaches to women's history and 
a study of selected aspects of the history of women in Canada, 
Mexico, the United States, and the Caribbean. Prerequisites: 
Inner Core and MC-UST or MC-IS category. 



History 



189 



265 AFRICAN CIVILIZATION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Political, social, cultural, and economic survey of Sub- 
Sahara African Civilization from about 1000 to about 1884 
(European expansion). 

266 MODERN AFRICA 
3 sem. hrs. 

Political, social, cultural, and economic survey of Mod- 
ern Africa from the beginnings of European expansion to 
the present. 

269 HISTORY OF JAPANESE RELIGIONS 
3 sem. hrs. 

A study of the development of Japanese Religions from Pre- 
History to the present. 

270 WORLD RELIGIONS/WORLD VIEWS 
3 sem. hrs. 

The great religions of the world, primarily Judaism, Hin- 
duism, Buddhism, Christianity, and Islam; also includes 
Zoroastrianism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shintoism, primal 
religion, humanism, Marxism, and civil religion. 

271 ISLAMIC CIVILIZATION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Political, social, economic survey of the Middle East from 
Muhammad to the 19th century, emphasizing origins and 
achievements of the Islamic age. 

272 MODERN MIDDLE EAST 
3 sem. hrs. 

Political, social, and economic-survey of the Middle East 
from the 19th century to the present, emphasizing the rise 
of the modern nation-states. 

274 HISTORY OF WESTERN MEDICINE 
3 sem. hrs. 

The experience and management of ill health in Western 
societies from Classical times to the present day. 

275 HISTORY OF JAPANESE CIVILIZATION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Topical and chronological examination of Japanese reli- 
gions, philosophies, art, music, literature, societal values 
and behavior to 1800. 

276 HISTORY OF CHINESE CIVILIZATION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Topical and chronological examination of Chinese religions, 
art, music, literature, societal values and behavior to 1911. 

278 UNITED STATES MILITARY HISTORY 
3 sem. hrs. 

U.S. military history in a global context from the colonial 
period to the present. Prerequisites: HIS 102 or 135 or 136 
or consent instructor. 

279 WORLD WAR II 
3 sem. hrs. 

General survey of World War II including military, diplo- 
matic, and cultural concerns. 

282 COLONIAL LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Intermediate study of the social, political, intellectual, and 
economic history of colonial Latin America (Latin Amer- 
ica to 1821). 



283 HISTORY OF CUBA 
3 sem. hrs. 

Intermediate study of the social, political, intellectual, and eco- 
nomic history of Cuba, with emphasis on the modem period. 

290 HISTORY-SOCIAL SCIENCE 
TEACHING METHODOLOGY I 
3 sem. hrs. 

Special methods and pre-student teaching clinical experiences 
for History-Social Sciences Teacher Education students. 
Includes observation and participation in classroom settings. 
Must be completed prior to student teaching. Includes Clinical 
Experiences. Required for History Social Science Teacher 
Education programs. Prerequisites: C or better in C&I 216 or 
concurrent registration and Admission to Professional Studies. 
Exceptions may be made by consent instructor. 

292 CAREERS FOR HISTORY AND 
SOCIAL SCIENCES MAJORS 
1 sem. hr. 

Acquaints students with career opportunities and relates 
History and Social Sciences skills learned to those needed 
in various career situations. Includes instruction in job 
placement skills. 

296 HISTORIOGRAPHY AND 
HISTORICAL METHOD 
3 sem. hrs. 

This class serves as a foundation for honors work. A stu- 
dent in the University Honors Program may arrange with 
the Honors Program Office for this course to count as the 
Honors participation requirement for continuation of that 
program. Prerequisites: Consent instructor; 3.50 GPA in 
history; majors only. 

300 SENIOR SEMINAR IN HISTORY 
3 sem. hrs. 

An advanced study of the methods, sources, and problems of 
the field of history, using a topical approach that varies from 
section to section. To be taken in the last full semester on 
campus. Prerequisites: HIS/HIS -Social Sciences Education 
only. HIS 200 or consent instructor. 

301 HONORS THESIS 
3 sem. hrs. 

The course provides the student with the opportunity to com- 
plete the writing of the honors thesis and to present a sum- 
mary of the thesis at a public forum or defend the thesis 
before relevant faculty. May be counted for HIS 300 
SENIOR SEMINAR major requirement. Cannot be CR/NC. 
Prerequisites: HIS 296 and 299; admission to department 
honors program; consent of department. 

306 REGIONAL AND AREA STUDIES 
1-9 sem. hrs. 

Intensive on-site study of particular lands, environments, 
cultures, and peoples. Materials charge optional. Prerequi- 
site: Any 200-level HIS course or consent instructor. 

307 SELECTED TOPICS IN 
NON-WESTERN HISTORY 
3 sem. hrs. 

The study of non-Western history through a topical 
approach. Topics will vary from semester to semester. May 
be repeated if topic different. Prerequisites: 1 of the follow- 
ing: HIS 103.01, 103.02, 103.03, 103.04, 104.01, 104.02, 
104.03, 104.04, 263, 265, 266, 271, 272, 275, 276 or IDS 
203; and HIS 200 or consent instructor. 



190 



History 



308 SELECTED TOPICS IN EUROPEAN HISTORY 
3 sem. hrs. 

The study of European history through a topical approach. 
Topics will vary from semester to semester. May repeat for 
credit if content is different. Prerequisites: HIS 101, 102 and 
200 or consent instructor. 

309 SELECTED TOPICS IN UNITED 
STATES HISTORY 

3 sem. hrs. 

This course focuses on a specific topic or era of United 
States history, emphasizing conflicting interpretations 
and use of primary sources. May repeat for credit if 
topic different. Prerequisites: HIS 135; 136; 200 or con- 
sent instructor. 

310 NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY 
3 sem. hrs. 

An examination of the major themes and events of Native 
American history and culture from pre-Columbian times to the 
present. Prerequisite: HIS 135 or 136 or consent instructor. 

311 AGE OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

3 sem. hrs. 

The emergence of the United States as an independent nation 
from 1763 to the Constitutional Convention in 1787. 

315 SLAVERY AND THE OLD SOUTH 

3 sem. hrs. 

Historiography of slavery and the pre-Civil War South. Pre- 
requisite: HIS 135 or 257 or consent instructor. 

320 LINCOLN: THE MAN AND HIS TIMES 
3 sem. hrs. 

Attention directed especially toward the work of Lincoln in 
Illinois, his leadership during the Civil War, and his relation- 
ships with people and events of his time. Prerequisite: Any 
200-level American History course or consent instructor. 

322 AMERICAN URBAN HISTORY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Survey of the history of the American city from the 
Colonial Era to the present. Prerequisite: 1 of the follow- 
ing: ECO 238, GEO 204, HIS 200, POL 209, SOC 271; or 
consent instructor. 

323 AMERICAN CULTURAL AND 
INTELLECTUAL HISTORY: 1620-1860 
3 sem. hrs. 

American progress in the fine arts, philosophy, literature, 
and science from Puritan times to 1860. Prerequisite: HIS 
135 or consent instructor. 

324 AMERICAN CULTURAL AND 
INTELLECTUAL HISTORY: 1860-PRESENT 
3 sem. hrs. 

The impact of naturalism, industrialization, secularization, 
and urbanization upon American culture since 1860. Prereq- 
uisite: HIS 136 or consent instructor. 

329 RURAL LIFE AND SOCIETY 
IN THE U.S.: 1800-PRESENT 
3 sem. hrs. 

Examines American rural society from 1800 to the pre- 
sent, with emphasis on the impact of change upon farming 
communities. Prerequisite: Any 100- or 200-level United 
States History course or consent instructor. 



330 THE FAMILY IN HISTORY 
3 sem. hrs. 

History of the family in Europe and America, viewing the 
changes from idealist, economic determinist, family systems, 
and psychoanalytic perspectives. Prerequisite: Any 100- or 
200-level HIS course or consent instructor. 

335 THE HOLOCAUST: THE EVENT 
AND ITS AFTERMATH 

3 sem. hrs. 

Study of the Holocaust, frequently regarded as the defining 
event of the 20th century, its pre-history, and its aftermath. 

345 FRENCH REVOLUTION 
AND NAPOLEON: 1789-1815 
3 sem. hrs. 

Society, culture and government under the monarchy; 
destruction of the old order; rise and fall of Napoleonic 
France. Prerequisite: Any 200-level European History 
course or consent instructor. 

351 ANCIENT NEAR EAST 
3 sem. hrs. 

The civilizations of Mesopotamia and Egypt from the 
neolithic period to 500 B.C. Prerequisite: Any 200- or 300- 
level non-United States History course or consent instructor. 

355 POPULAR CULTURE IN 
EARLY MODERN EUROPE 
3 sem. hrs. 

History of the culture of the common population of Europe 
1400 to 1800: pre-conditions, formation, principal elements, 
decline of the culture. 

356 THE ENLIGHTENMENT 
3 sem. hrs. 

Intellectual and social history of the Western world during the 
18th century. Prerequisite: HIS 102 or consent instructor. 

357 LATE MEDIEVAL AND EARLY 
MODERN BRITAIN 

3 sem. hrs. 

Selected topics in British history, c. 1350 - c. 1750. Not for 
credit if had 226, 227, 359, or 360. Prerequisite: HIS 231 or 
consent instructor. 

366 SOVIET RUSSIA 
3 sem. hrs. 

Study of communist revolution, culture, and dictatorship and 
its transformation into a contemporary European democracy. 

373 HISTORY OF MODERN CHINA 
3 sem. hrs. 

Concentrates on the Western and Chinese collision since the 
1800's and the responses of traditional, national, and con- 
temporary China to modernization. 

375 HISTORY OF MODERN JAPAN 
3 sem. hrs. 

Concentrates on Japan's modernization, goals of Meiji lead- 
ers, contradictory tendencies of pre-war Japan, and contem- 
porary Japan. 

378 ISLAM 
3 sem. hrs. 

In-depth study of Islam, focusing on ideas rather than events. 
Topics include law, mysticism, art, and resurgent Islam. 



History; Languages, Literatures, and Cultures 



191 



390 HISTORY-SOCIAL SCIENCE 
TEACHING METHODOLOGY II 

3 sem. hrs. 

Includes Clinical Experiences. History-Social Science mate- 
rials, use of instructional models, and clinical experiences. 
Must be completed prior to student teaching. Prerequisites: 
Grade of C or better in HIS 290 and C&I 216 or concurrent 
registration. Admission to Student Teaching. 

394 ORAL HISTORY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Study and use of oral history as a research tool, and its 
application as a research technique. Prerequisite: HIS 135 
or 136 or consent instructor. 

395 ARCHIVES AND MANUSCRIPTS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Nature, acquisition, processing and use of archives and 
manuscripts. Emphasis on theory and principles with 
practical exercises. Prerequisite: Any 200-level HIS course 
or consent instructor. 

398 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 
INTERNSHIP IN HISTORY 

1-16 sem. hrs. 

Planned, supervised experience in a professional capacity 
in archives, business, government, historical archaeology, 
historical preservation, historical editing and publishing, 
historical societies, museums, or other application of his- 
tory. Maximum 6 hours towards HIS/HIS Ed major. Pre- 
requisites: Consent of department's intern coordinator; 75 
hours completed; 2.60 GPA overall and in major; History 
major (includes those in History-Social Sciences Teacher 
Education Sequence) only. 



LANGUAGES, LITERATURES, 
AND CULTURES (LAN) 430 

114 Stevenson Hall, (309) 438-3604 
Web address: LLC.IUinoisState.edu 
Email address: foreignlanguages@ilstu.edu 

Chairperson: Daniel L. Everett. 

Tenured/Tenure-track Faculty: 

Professors: Alstrum, Everett, Nance, Reid, Thomas, Trouille, 
van der Laan, Weeks. 

Associate Professors: Burningham, Druker, Heggie, Mir, Pan- 
crazio, Pao, Segelcke. 

Assistant Professors: Curto, Davis, Hildebrandt, Lynd, Shiv- 
ery, Schmeiser. 

General Department Information 

HONORS IN LANGUAGES, LITERATURES, 
AND CULTURES 

The Department invites highly qualified majors (or dou- 
ble majors) to distinguish themselves by earning honors in 
French, German, or Spanish. To be admitted to the program a 
student must: (1) have completed 60 hours of university-level 
work; (2) be a declared major or double major in Languages, 
Literatures, and Cultures; and (3) have a minimum overall 
GPA of 3.30 with a GPA of 3.60 in the chosen language. 



In order to graduate with departmental honors a student 
must:(l) complete the general requirements for the major; 
(2) maintain an overall GPA of 3.30 and a GPA of 3.60 in 
the major language; (3) complete 9 hours of in-course hon- 
ors work at the 300-level in the major; (4) complete an hon- 
ors thesis while enrolled as a senior in either LAN 299, 
Independent Honors Study, or in their 300-level capstone 
project; (5) fulfill the general requirements for participation 
in the University Honors Program. Students interested in 
participating may obtain additional information from the 
Director of the Honors Program in Languages, Literatures, 
and Cultures. The Department also offers in-course honors 
work for students enrolled in the University Honors Program 
at the discretion of the instructor. 

ASSOCIATED MINORS 

The Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures 
participates in the minors in Cognitive Science; Ethnic Stud- 
ies; International Studies; and Latin American, Caribbean, and 
Latino/a Studies. For further information, please consult the 
Department advisor as well as the section entitled "University- 
Wide Curriculum" in this Undergraduate Catalog. 

MINOR IN EAST ASIAN STUDIES 

Advisor: Roger Thomas 
Office: 134 Stevenson Hall 
Phone: (309) 438-7982 

The Minor in East Asian Studies provides an interdis- 
ciplinary approach to exploring the languages, politics, 
society, and cultures of countries in East Asia. Two tracks 
are available: a language track, emphasizing language and 
culture; and an interdisciplinary track, emphasizing the 
socio-political and cultural dynamics of the countries located 
in the region and their roles in the world. 

Course requirements: 

The plan of study must be created in consultation with 
the East Asian Studies advisor. 

— 24 hours required. 

— Required courses for all students: two-year sequence in an 
East Asian language; either Chinese 111, 112, 115, and an 
additional course approved by the advisor, or Japanese 
111,112,115,116. 

— Choose one option: 

— Option 1: Language Track: LAN (JPN) 231, 232, 
and one elective from any elective group. 

— Option 2: Interdisciplinary Track: In consultation 
with the East Asian Studies advisor, sufficient electives 
from at least three of the following groups: 

A. Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cul- 
tures: LAN (JPN) 111, 112, 115, 116, 231, 232; LAN 
(CHI) 111, 112, 115; 

B. Department of History: HIS 104.02, 269, 275, 
276, 373, 375; 

C. Department of Politics and Government: POL 
140, 245, 345; 

D. Department of Philosophy: PHI 208; 



192 Languages, Literatures, and Cultures 



E. Department of Sociology and Anthropology: 
ANT 294; 

F. School of Music: MUS 275.01; 

G. Interdisciplinary Studies: IDS 203.10. 

See course descriptions by department. Other electives, 
including course work taken abroad, may be counted toward 
the minor with prior approval of the minor advisor. 

MINOR IN FOREIGN LANGUAGES IN THE 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (FLES) 

For advisement, please contact the Department of 
Languages, Literatures, and Cultures. 

The Minor in Foreign Languages in the Elementary 
School (FLES) is designed primarily for Elementary Educa- 
tion majors who plan to teach a foreign language as part of 
the elementary school curriculum. Students take courses in a 
single target language and a course in FLES methodology, 
including practicum experience. Completion of the minor 
constitutes completion of the 1 8 hour area requirement for 
Elementary Education. 

— A minimum of 23 and a maximum of 31 hours 
required. The number of hours required for the FLES 
minor depends on the level at which a student begins 
the program. Students with no previous foreign lan- 
guage study begin with LAN 1 1 1 and complete 3 1 
hours; students with 2 years of high school foreign 
language (or equivalent) begin with LAN 112 and 
must complete 27 hours beyond 111; students with 3 
or more years of foreign language begin at 1 1 5 and 
must complete 23 hours beyond 112. Consult the 
Languages, Literatures, and Cultures advisor if addi- 
tional placement information is needed. 

Student may complete the FLES minor in French, Ger- 
man, Japanese, or Spanish: 

- Required courses for French FLES: FR 111, 112, 115, 
1 16, 213, 214, 220 or 305, 235; LAN 355. 

— Required courses for German FLES: GER 111, 112, 
115, 116, 211,213, 217, 317; LAN 355. 

— Required courses for Japanese FLES: JPN 111, 112, 

115, 116, 231, 232, 285; LAN 355 and 3 approved elec- 
tive hours. 

- Required courses for Spanish FLES: SPA 1 1 1, 1 12, 1 15, 

1 16, 213, 214, 223, 243 or 244; LAN 355. 

(LAN 214 not for credit if have ACTFL speaking score 
of Advanced. See the Languages, Literatures and Cul- 
tures advisor for substitute courses.) 
20 clinical hours of types 1, 2, 4, and 5, usually taken 
while enrolled in LAN 355. 

INTEGRATED BACHELOR OF ARTS (B.A.) AND 
MASTER OF ARTS (M.A.) IN LANGUAGES, 
LITERATURES, AND CULTURES 

The Integrated Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) and Master of 
Arts (M.A.) in Languages, Literatures, and Cultures enables 
a student to complete the B.A. and M.A. degrees in five 
years. It is available to the most promising Illinois State Uni- 



versity, non-teacher education majors in French, German, or 
Spanish. Students with a 3.50 G.P.A. or higher may apply 
after they have completed at least two 200-level courses. 
Applications must be made to Admissions. Two letters of 
recommendation and a writing sample should be sent to the 
Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures. 

Students accepted into the program must have suffi- 
cient undergraduate credits (approximately 90 hours) by 
their senior year in order to take courses for graduate as 
well as undergraduate credit. They do not normally com- 
plete a second undergraduate major. 

All regular undergraduate requirements for the B.A. 
degree outside of the major will apply to candidates for 
the integrated degree. 

Candidates generally take nine hours of graduate credit 
during their senior year and eighteen ( 1 8) hours of graduate 
credit during their graduate (fifth) year, and one course for 
joint credit, for the equivalent of thirty (30) graduate hours. 
Fifteen (15) course hours must be at the 400 level and 
approved as part of the graduate plan of study. All courses 
required for the regular B.A. will be completed by the end of 
the senior year. Should a student decide to leave the integrat- 
ed B.A./M.A. program and complete only a B.A., all regular 
undergraduate degree requirements will apply. 

The two semesters of graduate study must take place at 
Illinois State University. B.A./M.A. students are eligible to 
receive a graduate assistantship during their graduate year 
and, if they have already completed 1 20 hours, during the 
last semester of their fourth year. One hundred forty-seven 
(147) hours are required for the integrated program. Upon 
completion of the program, both a Bachelor of Arts degree 
and a Master of Arts degree will be awarded. 

French Sequence: In addition to the 27 hours of graduate 
study, the French Sequence requires 35 hours of under- 
graduate study, including French 115, 116, 213, 214, 220, 
235 or 335, 305, and four additional 300-level courses 
approved by the Department. 

German Sequence: In addition to the 27 hours of graduate 
study, the German Sequence requires 35 hours of undergrad- 
uate study, including German 115, 116, 211, 213, 217, and 
six courses at the 300 level approved by the Department. 

Spanish Sequence: In addition to the 27 hours of graduate 
study, the Spanish Sequence requires 33 or 34 hours of 
undergraduate study, including Spanish 116 or 120, 213, 
215, 223, 233, 305; two courses among 323, 324, or 325; 
and three courses among 310, 31 1, 336, 337, 360, 385. Only 
students beginning study at Spanish 1 16 or higher are eligi- 
ble for this sequence. 

All sequences: The 27 graduate hours for all sequences 
must be completed with an average GPA of 3.00 or higher 
in at least three of the following areas: culture, linguistics, 
literature, and pedagogy. Students must pass a comprehen- 
sive examination and may choose to write a master's thesis 
as part of their graduate requirements. Details about acade- 
mic requirements may be obtained from the Department of 
Languages, Literatures, and Cultures. 



Languages, Literatures, and Cultures 



193 



TEACHER EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS FOR 
LANGUAGES, LITERATURES, AND CULTURES 
MAJORS 

Students seeking a Teacher Education degree must com- 
plete University- Wide Teacher Education program require- 
ments. These include a minimum GPA of 3.00 in the major, 
a cumulative GPA of 2.75, and Advanced Low score or 
above on OPI for Student Teaching. All Teacher Education 
majors must complete LAN 319 and 320. LAN 319 is taken 
in the fall semester and 320 in the spring semester of the 
junior or senior year. Teacher Education students are encour- 
aged to apply for Admission to Professional Studies as soon 
as they have completed 30 hours, and must complete the 
Professional Education course work, Illinois State Universi- 
ty's General Education requirements, and all other Teacher 
Education requirements (See the University- Wide Teacher 
Education section of this Undergraduate Catalog). 

CLINICAL EXPERIENCES IN TEACHER EDUCATION 

Clinical Experiences are provided in off-campus clinical 
teaching centers, in local schools and in campus laboratory 
schools, in agencies and other approved non-school settings. 
All students will show verification of having completed pre- 
student teaching field experiences commensurate with 
attaining local, state, and national standards. Students must 
provide their own transportation to Clinical Experience sites. 

The approximate number of clinical hours and type of 
activity associated with each course offering can be found 
with the appropriate course description. The following leg- 
end relates to the type and kind of activity related to a specif- 



Clinical Experiences Legend 



1 . Observation 

2. Tutoring one-on-one contact 

3. Non-instruction assisting 

4. Instructional aiding a group 

5. Micro teaching 

6. Simulation lab exercises 

7. Work with clinic client 

8. Graduate practicum 

9. Professional meeting 

10. Other 



French Programs 

Degree Offered: B.A. 

MAJOR IN FRENCH 

— A minimum of 35 hours and maximum of 43 hours in 
French are required. The number of hours required for 
the Major in French depends on the level at which a 
student begins the program. Students with no previous 
study in French begin the language with FR 1 1 1 and 
must complete 43 hours. Students with 2 years of high 
school French (or equivalent) normally begin with FR 
112 and must complete 39 hours beyond FR 111. Stu- 



dents with 3 years of high school French (or equivalent) 
normally begin with FR 1 15 and must complete 35 hours 
beyond 1 1 1 and 112. The best way to assure that a stu- 
dent begins at the right ISU level is to use the above as a 
reference and then to take the online self-placement test 
at: http://www.llc.ilstu.edu/french/placementtest.shtml. 
- Required courses: FR 115, 116, 213, 214, 220, 223, 
235, 305, plus 9 elective hours at the 300-level or 
above including at least one 300-level literature course, 
and in one of the 300-level courses students must com- 
plete a Senior Research Project. 

Teacher Certification Sequence: 

— A minimum of 41 hours and a maximum of 49 hours in 
French are required. The number of hours required for 
the Major in French for Teacher Certification depends 
on the level at which a student begins the program. 
Students with no previous study in French begin the 
language with FR 1 1 1 and must complete 49 hours. 
Students with 2 years of high school French (or equiv- 
alent) normally begin with FR 1 12 and must complete 
45 hours beyond FR 111. Students with 3 years of high 
school French (or equivalent) normally begin with FR 
1 1 5 and must complete 4 1 hours beyond FR 1 1 1 and 
112. The best way to assure that a student begins at the 
right ISU level is to use the above as a reference and 
then to take the online self-placement test at: 
http ://www. lie . ilstu.edu/french/placementtest. shtml . 

— Required courses: FR 115, 116, 209, 213, 214, 220, 
223, 235, 305; LAN 319, 320; and either FR 314 or 
325, plus one 300-level elective and sufficient other 
electives to meet the total hour requirement as indi- 
cated above. 

— Part of entitlement program leading to K-12 (Type 10) 
certification. 

— Recommended electives: FR 335, 340; LAN 321. 

MINOR IN FRENCH 

— 25 hours in French required. 

— Required courses: FR 1 1 1, 1 12, 1 15, 1 16, 213; plus suf- 
ficient electives to meet the 2 5 -hour requirement. 

MINOR IN FRENCH 
For Teacher Education: 

— A minimum of 27 and a maximum of 35 hours in French 
are required. The number of hours required for the Minor 
in French for Teacher Certification depends on the level 
at which a student begins the program. Students with no 
previous study in French begin the language with FR 1 1 1 
and must complete 35 hours. Students with 2 years of 
high school French (or equivalent) normally begin with 
FR 112 and must complete 31 hours beyond 111. Stu- 
dents with 3 years of high school French (or equivalent) 
normally begin with FR 115 and must complete 27 
hours beyond 1 1 1 and 112. 

— Required courses: FR 115, 116, 209, 213, 214; LAN 
319; plus sufficient electives to meet the total hour 
requirements as indicated above. 



194 Languages, Literatures, and Cultures 

— Recommended electives: FR 220, 223, 235, 314, 325, 
335, 340; LAN 320, 321. 

The French for Teacher Education Minor does not 
lead directly to teacher certification. Students seeking an 
additional teaching endorsement in this academic area 
should contact their advisor or the Illinois State Board of 
Education Website (www.isbe.net) for specific certifica- 
tion requirements. 



German Programs 

Degree Offered: B.A. 
MAJOR IN GERMAN 

— 35-43 hours in German required. 

— Required courses: GER 115, 116, 211, 213, 217, 310, 
317, 322, 385, and sufficient electives to meet the total 
hour requirement indicated above. 

— The number of hours required for the Major in Ger- 
man depends on the level at which the student 
begins the program. Students with no previous study 
in German begin in GER 1 1 1 and are required to 
complete 43 hours. Students with 2 years of high 
school German or equivalent normally begin with 
GER 112 and are required to complete 39 hours, 
exclusive of GER 111. Students with 3 years of high 
school German or equivalent normally begin in GER 
115 and are required to complete 35 hours, exclu- 
sive of GER 111 and 112. 

Teacher Certification Sequence: 

— 4 1 -49 hours in German required. Part of entitlement 
program leading to K-12 (Type 10) certification. 

— Required courses: GER 115, 116, 211, 213, 217, 310, 
317, 322; LAN 319, 320; and sufficient electives to 
meet the total hour requirement indicated below. 

— Recommended electives: GER 385 (course may be 
repeated if content is different); LAN 321. 

— The number of hours required for the Major in Ger- 
man for Teacher Certification depends on the level 
at which a student begins the program. Students 
with no previous study in German begin the lan- 
guage with GER 1 1 1 and are required to complete 
49 hours. Students with 2 years of high school Ger- 
man (or equivalent) normally begin with GER 112 
and are required to complete 45 hours, exclusive of 
GER 111. Students with 3 years of high school Ger- 
man (or equivalent) normally begin with GER 115 
and are required to complete 41 hours, exclusive of 
GER 111 and 112. 

MINOR IN GERMAN 

— 25 hours in German required. 

— Required courses: GER 111, 112, 115, 116, 211, 213, 
plus one 300-level course to meet the 25-hour minimum. 



MINOR IN GERMAN 

For Teacher Education: 

— 27-35 hours in German required. 

— Required courses: German 115, 116, 211, 213, 217; 
LAN 3 1 9, plus sufficient electives to meet the total hour 
requirement indicated previously. 

— Recommended electives: GER 310, 317, 322; LAN 
320,321. 

— The number of hours required for the Minor in Ger- 
man for Teacher Certification depends on the level 
at which a student begins the program. Students 
with no previous study in German begin the lan- 
guage with GER 1 1 1 and are required to complete 
35 hours. Students with 2 years of high school Ger- 
man (or equivalent) normally begin with GER 112 
and are required to complete 31 hours, exclusive of 
GER 111. Students with 3 years of high school Ger- 
man (or equivalent) normally begin with GER 115 
and are required to complete 27 hours, exclusive of 
GER 111 and 112. 

The German for Teacher Education Minor does not 
lead directly to teacher certification. Students seeking an 
additional teaching endorsement in this academic area 
should contact their advisor or the Illinois State Board of 
Education Website (www.isbe.net) for specific certifica- 
tion requirements. 



Italian Program 

MINOR IN ITALIAN STUDIES 

Advisor: Jonathan Druker 
Office: 240 Stevenson Hall 
Phone: (309) 438-7978 

— - 25 hours in Italian and related courses required. 

— Required courses: ITN 111, 112, 115, 116, plus three 
elective courses to meet the 25-hour requirement. 

— Approved electives: ITN 221, 222; HIS 107, 221, 224; 
ART 375 or others approved by the Department. 

— Other courses taken in Italy may be counted toward the 
minor with prior approval of the minor advisor. 



Latin Program 

MINOR IN LATIN 

— 25 hours in Latin and related courses required. 

— Required courses: LAT 111, 112, 115, 116 plus suffi- 
cient electives to meet the 25-hour minimum. 

— Electives: LAN 106; HIS 220, 221; PHI 254; ART 368, 
or others approved by the Department. 

NOTE: A student seeking endorsement in teaching Latin 
must pass a State of Illinois content exam. 



Spanish Programs 

Degree Offered: B.A. 
MAJOR IN SPANISH 

— A minimum of 34 hours and a maximum of 43 hours in 
Spanish required. The number of hours required for the 
Major in Spanish depends on the level at which a stu- 
dent begins the program. Students with no previous 
study in Spanish begin the language with SPA 1 1 1 and 
must complete 43 hours. Students with 2 years of high 
school Spanish (or equivalent) normally begin with 
SPA 112 and must complete 39 hours beyond 111. 
Students with 3 years of high school Spanish (or equiv- 
alent) normally begin with SPA 115 and must com- 
plete 35 hours beyond SPA 1 1 1 and 1 12. 

— Required courses: SPA 1 15, 1 16 or 120, 213, 215, 223, 
233, 1 of the following: SPA 243, 244, 1 of the follow- 
ing: 323, 324, 325; plus 3 additional 300-level Spanish 
courses, AND in one of the 300-level courses, students 
must complete a capstone synthetic project. 

— Recommended electives: SPA 214 (not for credit if 
ACTFL speaking score is Advanced). 

Teacher Certification Sequence: 

— Part of entitlement program leading to K-12 (Type 10) 
certification. 

— A minimum of 40 hours and a maximum of 49 hours in 
Spanish required. The number of hours required for the 
Major in Spanish for Teacher Certification depends upon 
the level at which a student begins the program. Students 
with no previous study in Spanish begin the language 
with SPA 1 1 1 and must complete 49 hours. Students with 
2 years of high school Spanish (or equivalent) normally 
begin with SPA 1 12 and must complete 45 hours beyond 
SPA 111. Students with 3 years of high school Spanish 
(or equivalent) normally begin with SPA 1 1 5 and must 
complete 41 hours beyond SPA 1 1 1 and SPA 1 12. 

— Required courses: SPA 115, 116 or 120, 213, 215, 223, 
233, 243, 244; LAN 319, 320; plus sufficient electives to 
meet the total hour requirement previously indicated (2 of 
the 3 possible electives must be at the 300 level). 

— Recommended electives: SPA 214, 305, 310, 311, 323, 
324, 325, 360 (214 is not for credit if the ACTFL speak- 
ing score is Advanced); LAN 321. 

MINOR IN SPANISH 

— 24 hours in Spanish required. 

— Required courses: SPA 1 1 1, 1 12, 1 15, 1 16 or 120, 
213, 214 or 223 (214 not for credit if have ACTFL 
speaking score of Advanced), SPA 215 or 233, plus 
sufficient electives to meet the total hour requirement 
previously indicated. 

— Recommended elective: SPA 223, if not taken to fulfill 
requirement. 

— The Department reserves the right to limit the number of 
minors in times of oversubscription. 



Languages, Literatures, and Cultures 195 

MINOR IN SPANISH 
For Teacher Education: 

— A minimum of 26 and a maximum of 35 hours in 
Spanish required. The number of hours required for the 
Minor in Spanish for Teacher Certification depends on 
the level at which a student begins the program. Stu- 
dents with no previous study in Spanish begin the lan- 
guage with SPA 111 and must complete 35 hours. 
Students with 2 years of high school Spanish (or equiv- 
alent) normally begin with SPA 112 and must com- 
plete 3 1 hours beyond SPA 111. Students with three 
years of high school Spanish (or equivalent) normally 
begin with SPA 115 and must complete 27 hours 
beyond SPA 111 and 112. 

— Required courses: SPA 1 15, 116 or 120, 213, 214 or 
223, 215 or 233; LAN 319; plus sufficient electives to 
meet the total hour requirement previously indicated. 

— Recommended electives: SPA 214, 243, 244, 305 (214 
is not for credit if ACTFL speaking score is Advanced); 
LAN 319, 320, 321. 

— The Department reserves the right to limit the number of 
minors in times of oversubscription. 

The Spanish for Teacher Education Minor does not lead 
directly to teacher certification. Students seeking an addition- 
al teaching endorsement in this academic area should contact 
their advisor or the Illinois State Board of Education Website 
(www.isbe.net) for specific certification requirements. 

Languages, Literatures, and 
Cultures Courses 

Consult the department or University Website at 
IllinoisState.edu to determine which courses will be 
offered in a given semester. 

For those languages which have no specific placement 
recommendations listed in this Undergraduate Catalog, stu- 
dents who have had no prior instruction in a foreign language, 
or 1 year of instruction, should enroll in the 111 course for the 
appropriate language. Students who have had 2, 3, or 4 years 
generally enroll in 112, 115, or 116 respectively. If prior lan- 
guage study took place more than 1 year earlier, a student 
may choose to enroll at a lower level. Transfer students and 
native speakers should consult with the Department's academ- 
ic advisor to determine proper placement. 

CREDIT FOR ACQUIRED PROFICIENCY (CAP) 

If the first Languages, Literatures, and Cultures 
course in which a student enrolls is above 1 1 1 in the regu- 
lar sequence (112, 115, 116 or above), he or she may be 
eligible for proficiency acquired elsewhere. Student must 
apply for CAP by filling out a short form in the Depart- 
ment of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures. 

Credit toward graduation for acquired proficiency will 
be granted upon completion at Illinois State University of 1 
course (excluding Independent Study) with the grade of C or 
better. It is recommended that the course be taken as soon as 



196 Languages, Literatures, and Cultures 

possible after matriculation at Illinois State University. Stu- 
dents are reminded that no course in the major or minor may 
be taken under the CT/NC option. 

Students beginning at the 112-level and fulfilling the 
previous requirements will be granted 4 hours of CAP. Stu- 
dents beginning at the 1 15-level or above and fulfilling the 
above requirements will be granted 8 hours of CAP. 

300-Level Languages, Literatures, and Cultures Courses: 

Instruction in courses in literature and culture of the 
major fields of specialization (French, German, Spanish) 
will be given in the language of specialization whenever 
possible. 



General Courses 

106 MYTH AND MEANING OC-H 

3 sem. hrs. 

Major myths of the world; their nature, origins, cultural sig- 
nificance, interpretation, and relevance today. Prerequisites: 
ENG 101; COM 1 10. MC-LH category recommended. 

125 LITERARY NARRATIVE MC-LH 

3 sem. hrs. 

Critical reading and analysis of a variety of literary narra- 
tives that reflect on human experience. May not be taken 
under the CT/NC option. Also offered as ENG 125. Prereq- 
uisites: ENG 101; COM 1 10 or concurrent registration. 

128 GENDER IN THE HUMANITIES MC-LH 
3 sem. hrs. 

Examination of gender roles, norms, and stereotypes from 
a broad range of perspectives within humanities across cen- 
turies and cultures. May not be taken under the CT/NC 
option. Also offered as COM/ENG 128. Prerequisites: 
ENG 101; COM 1 10 or concurrent registration. 

143 UNITY AND DIVERSITY IN LANGUAGE 
3 sem. hrs. OC-SS 

Introduction to the disciplined study of human language 
as it reflects human cognition, social relations, cultural 
conventions, and speech communities. Also offered as 
ANT/ENG 143. Prerequisite: Inner Core. 

206 CULTURAL EXPRESSIONS IN SOCIAL 
CONTEXTS: WOMEN OF ASIA, LATIN 
AMERICA AND AFRICA OC-H 

3 sem. hrs. 

Interdisciplinary study of varieties of women's cultural 
expressions within distinct social contexts including compar- 
ative emphasis on different regions of concern. Also offered 
as ENG 206. Prerequisites: ENG 101; COM 110; MC-IS 
category. WGS 120 recommended. 

292 CAREERS IN FOREIGN LANGUAGES 
1 sem. hr. 

Provides students with career information and job search 
techniques. Formerly CAREER DEVELOPMENT FOR 
FOREIGN LANGUAGE MAJORS. Prerequisite: LAN 
major/minor only. 



300 RESEARCH IN FOREIGN LANGUAGES 
1-3 sem. hrs. 

Supervised work in a foreign literature, in comparative lan- 
guage studies, or in educational materials for foreign lan- 
guage laboratory. Assignments will depend on the 
preparation and interest of the student. May repeat if con- 
tent differs. Prerequisite: Consent department chair. 

319 PRINCIPLES IN FOREIGN 
LANGUAGE LEARNING 

4 sem. hrs. 

Exploration and application of recent scholarship, stan- 
dards-based instruction and methods of teaching, integrated 
with field experiences. Includes Clinical Experiences: 35 
hours, Type 1, 2, 5, 9, 10. Prerequisites: B or better in FR 
235 or SPA 213 or GER 310. C or better in C&I 210 and 
C&I 216 or concurrent registration. Admission to Profes- 
sional Studies. Intermediate High score or above on OPI. 

320 FOREIGN LANGUAGE TEACHING 
IN THE K-12 SETTING 

2 sem. hrs. 

Methods of teaching foreign languages in K-12 schools. 
Special emphasis is given to materials and activities leading 
to mastery. Includes Clinical Experiences: 12 hours, Type 1, 
5, 10. Formerly FOREIGN LANGUAGE TEACHING IN 
THE SECONDARY SCHOOL. Prerequisites: B or better in 
LAN 319. Admission to Professional Studies. 

321 INTEGRATING TECHNOLOGY INTO 
THE FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLASSROOM 

2 sem. hrs. 

Supplementing the basic methodology of Foreign Language 
teaching with media materials and the techniques for their 
use in the language classroom. Formerly MEDIA MATERI- 
ALS AND USE IN THE TEACHING OF FOREIGN LAN- 
GUAGES Prerequisites: C or better in C&I 216 or PSY 215 
or concurrent registration. COM 240 recommended. 

350 FOREIGN LANGUAGE TESTING 
AND ASSESSMENT 

3 sem. hrs. 

Exploration of development and uses of language tests 
according to current views of foreign language teaching. 
Prerequisites: FR, GER, or SPA 213 or equivalent; foreign 
language proficiency; LAN 3 1 9 recommended. 

398 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: INTERNSHIPS 
AND COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 
IN FOREIGN LANGUAGE 
1-16 sem. hrs. 

Maximum 16 hours toward graduation. Depending upon 
nature of placement, department may allow 1-4 hours to 
count toward major/minor in language used. May be 
repeated. Prerequisites: Complete department applica- 
tion procedure. 

Chinese Courses 

1 1 1 FIRST- YEAR CHINESE (PART I) 

4 sem. hrs. 

Introductory Chinese emphasizing listening and speaking 
skills; concentration on understanding and using simple 
phrases and vocabulary. 



112 FIRST-YEAR CHINESE (PART II) 
4 sem. hrs. 

Continuation of Introductory Chinese emphasizing listening 
and speaking skills; concentration on understanding and 
using simple phrases and vocabulary. Prerequisites: Chinese 
1 1 1 or consent instructor. 

115 SECOND-YEAR CHINESE (PART I) 
4 sem. hrs. 

Review of basic grammatical patterns, vocabulary building, 
development of reading and writing abilities. Prerequisites: 
Chinese 1 12 or consent instructor. 

French Courses 

1 1 1 FIRST-YEAR FRENCH (PART I) 
4 sem. hrs. 

Pronunciation; essentials of grammar; exercises in hearing, 
speaking and writing French; reading material of graded 
difficulty. Not recommended if student had 3 years of high 
school French. Not for credit if had FR 1 15 or 1 16. 

112 FIRST-YEAR FRENCH (PART II) 
4 sem. hrs. 

Continuation of Part I. Not for credit if had FR 1 15 or 1 16. 

115 SECOND-YEAR FRENCH (PART I) 
4 sem. hrs. 

Class reading of short stories, plays, and essays. Grammar 
review, oral and written composition. Prerequisites: FR 1 12 
or high school French equivalent. 

116 SECOND- YEAR FRENCH (PART II) MC-LH 
4 sem. hrs. 

Continuation of FR 115. Class reading of short stories, plays, 
and essays. Grammar review, oral and written composition. 
Prerequisites: FR 115. ENG 101 required if course taken 
as part of General Education program. 

209 FRENCH PHONETICS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Scientific approach to French pronunciation, correct forma- 
tion of French sounds, practical application of the theory of 
phonetics. Formerly FR 309. Prerequisite: FR 1 16. 

213 ADVANCED TECHNIQUES 
IN WRITTEN FRENCH 

3 sem. hrs. 

Written communication skills in French. Formal and infor- 
mal writing, use of dictionaries and reference materials, 
orthography, and vocabulary building. Grammar review. 
Prerequisite: FR 116. 

214 ADVANCED FRENCH CONVERSATION 
AND CONTEMPORARY CULTURE 

3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to contemporary French culture and develop- 
ment of oral communication and listening skills. Prerequi- 
site: FR 116. 

220 ADVANCED FRENCH READING 
AND VOCABULARY SKILLS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Vocabulary building through the reading and discussion 
of representative French poems, plays, and prose texts. 
Grammar review. Prerequisites: FR213. 



Languages, Literatures, and Cultures 197 

223 INTRODUCTION TO FRENCH 
LITERATURE IN CONTEXT 
3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to major works of French literature in their cul- 
tural and socio-historical contexts. Not for credit if had FR 
221,222. Prerequisites: FR 213 and 220. 

235 ADVANCED FRENCH GRAMMAR 
3 sem. hrs. 

Systematic study of the morphology and syntax of the 
modern French language. Prerequisites: 2 courses beyond 
FR 1 16. FR 213 and 220 recommended. 

305 HISTOIRE DE LA CIVILISATION FRANCAISE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Survey of French culture and civilization from ancient times 
to the present day. May repeat if content differs. Prerequi- 
sites: 2 courses beyond FR 1 16. 

314 STUDIES IN CONTEMPORARY 
FRANCOPHONE CULTURE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to Francophone cultures, primarily outside 
France, through the study of literary texts, films, and histo- 
riography. May be repeated if content differs. Formerly 
STUDIES IN CONTEMPORARY FRENCH AND 
FRANCOPHONE CULTURE. Prerequisites: 2 courses 
beyond FR 116. 

325 SELECTED TOPICS IN FRANCOPHONE 
LITERATURE AND CULTURE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Readings of representative literary works in their cultural 
contexts written in French by authors residing outside 
France. May repeat if content differs. Prerequisites: 2 cours- 
es beyond FR 116. 

327 SELECTED TOPICS IN SEVENTEENTH- 
AND EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY FRENCH 
LITERATURE AND CULTURE 

3 sem. hrs. 

Readings of representative seventeenth- and/or eighteenth- 
century literary texts in their cultural (philosophical, politi- 
cal, social, economic, and/or historical) contexts. May repeat 
if content differs. Prerequisites: 2 courses beyond FR 1 16 

328 SELECTED TOPICS IN NINETEENTH- 
AND TWENTIETH-CENTURY 
FRENCH LITERATURE AND CULTURE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Readings of representative nineteenth- and/or twentieth-cen- 
tury literary texts in their cultural (philosophical, political, 
social, economic, and/or historical) contexts. May repeat if 
content differs. Prerequisites: 2 courses beyond FR 116. 

335 COMPARATIVE FRENCH/ENGLISH 
GRAMMAR AND STYLE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Intensive, advanced, comparative grammar, and composition, 
including analysis of stylistic differences between French and 
English. Prerequisite: FR 235 or consent instructor. 

340 INTRODUCTION TO APPLIED 
FRENCH LINGUISTICS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Principles and methods of objective language analysis 
applied to relevant issues in the French language and the 
teaching of French. Prerequisite: FR 235. 



198 



Languages, Literatures, and Cultures 



385 SELECTED TOPICS IN FRENCH LITERATURE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Intensive study of a genre, group of authors or a single major 
writer in French literature. This study varies each semester. 
May repeat if content differs. Prerequisites: 2 courses 
beyond FR 116. 



German Courses 

1 1 1 FIRST-YEAR GERMAN (PART I) 
4 sem. hrs. 

Pronunciation, essentials of grammar, reading materials 
of graded difficulty, oral and written exercises. Not rec- 
ommended if student had 3 years high school German. 
Not for credit if had GER 1 15 or 1 16. 

112 FIRST-YEAR GERMAN (PART II) 
4 sem. hrs. 

Continuation of Part I. Not recommended if student had 3 years 
high school German. Not for credit if had GER 1 1 5 or 1 1 6. 

115 SECOND- YEAR GERMAN (PART I) 
4 sem. hrs. 

Class reading of short stories, plays and essays. Grammar 
review, oral and written composition. Prerequisites: GER 
1 12 or 2 years high school German. 

116 SECOND-YEAR GERMAN (PART II) MC-LH 
4 sem. hrs. 

Continuation of GER 115. Class reading of short stories, plays, 
and essays. Grammar review, oral and written composition. 
Prerequisites: GER 115. ENG 101 required if course taken 
as part of General Education program. 

211 INTRODUCTION TO 

GERMAN LITERATURE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Readings and analysis of selected short stories, plays, poetry, 
and other literary forms as first general introduction to Ger- 
man literature. Prerequisite: GER 1 16 or equivalent. 

213 INTERMEDIATE 

GERMAN COMPOSITION 

3 sem. hrs. 

Study of written communication skills in German, vocabu- 
lary building, correct phrasing and style, writing strategies, 
use of dictionaries and reference materials. Prerequisite: 
GER 1 1 6 or consent department chair. 

217 GERMAN CULTURE AND CIVILIZATION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Overview of German culture from the beginning to World 
War I as derived from selected readings and class discussions. 
Prerequisite: GER 1 16 or consent department chair. 

310 ADVANCED STUDY OF THE 
GERMAN LANGUAGE 
3 sem. hrs. 

The study of linguistic concepts and their advanced appli- 
cation through the integration of practical work to 
improve language skills with appropriate theoretical top- 
ics in linguistics. Not for credit if had GER 309. Prerequi- 
site: GER 2 1 3 or consent department chair. 



317 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES OF THE 
GERMAN-SPEAKING COUNTRIES 

3 sem. hrs. 

Development of advanced German skills in reading, writing, 
speaking, and listening through a study of contemporary 
issues of the German-speaking countries since World War I, 
as reflected in essays and articles. Prerequisite: GER 217 or 
consent department chair. 

322 SURVEY OF GERMAN LITERATURE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Reading and discussion of representative works of the most 
important authors from the early 1 9th century to the present. 
Prerequisite: GER 21 1 or consent department chair. 

385 SELECTED TOPICS IN GERMAN 
LITERATURE OR CULTURE 

3 sem. hrs. 

Intensive study of a theme, genre, including film, group of 
authors, or a single major writer in German literature. May 
repeat if content differs. Prerequisite: GER 211 or consent 
department chair. 

Italian Courses 

1 1 1 FIRST-YEAR ITALIAN (PART I) 

4 sem. hrs. 

Pronunciation; essentials of grammar; exercises in compre- 
hending, speaking, and reading material of graded difficulty. 

112 FIRST- YEAR ITALIAN (PART II) 
4 sem. hrs. 

Continuation of Part I. 

115 SECOND-YEAR ITALIAN (PART I) 

4 sem. hrs. 

Continued development of aural-oral skills, reading and writing 
in Italian. Prerequisite: ITN 1 12 or consent department chair. 

116 SECOND-YEAR ITALIAN (PART II) MC-LH 
4 sem. hrs. 

Continuation of ITN 115. Class reading of short stories, 
plays, and essays. Grammar review, oral and written 
composition. Prerequisites: ITN 115 or consent depart- 
ment chair. ENG 101 required if course taken as part of 
General Education program. 

221 ADVANCED ITALIAN 
CONVERSATION AND 
CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Study of issues in contemporary Italian society; refinement 
of oral skills and reading comprehension. Prerequisite: ITN 
1 1 6 or equivalent. 

222 INTRODUCTION TO 
MODERN ITALIAN 
LITERATURE AND FILM 
3 sem. hrs. 

Study of representative modern literary texts; viewing and 
analysis of significant Italian films; advanced grammar and 
composition. Prerequisite: ITN 1 1 6 or equivalent. 



Japanese Courses 



1 1 1 FIRST- YEAR JAPANESE (PART I) 
4 sem. hrs. 

Introductory Japanese emphasizing listening and speaking 
skills; concentration on understanding and using simple 
phrases and vocabulary. 

112 FIRST-YEAR JAPANESE (PART II) 
4 sem. hrs. 

Continuation of introductory Japanese emphasizing listening 
and speaking skills; concentration on understanding and using 
simple phrases and vocabulary. Prerequisite: JPN 111. 

115 SECOND-YEAR JAPANESE (PART I) 

4 sem. hrs. 

Review of basic grammatical patterns, vocabulary building, 
development of reading and writing abilities. Prerequisite: 
JPN 1 12 or consent department chair. 

116 SECOND- YEAR JAPANESE (PART II) MC-LH 
4 sem. hrs. 

Continuation of JPN 115. Class reading of short stories, 
plays, and essays. Grammar review, oral and written com- 
position. Prerequisites: JPN 115 or consent department 
chair. ENG 1 1 required if course taken as part of Gener- 
al Education program. 

231 JAPANESE CONVERSATION 
AND COMPOSITION 

3 sem. hrs. 

Further development of written and oral skills through guided 
conversations and compositions on topics from contem- 
porary Japanese civilization. Prerequisite: JPN 116 or con- 
sent department chair. 

232 ADVANCED JAPANESE READING 
AND COMPOSITION 

3 sem. hrs. 

Development of reading fluency and writing proficiency in 
modern Japanese through study of unadapted texts, includ- 
ing selections from modem fiction. Prerequisite: JPN 231 or 
consent department chair. 

Latin Courses 

111 FIRST- YEAR LATIN (PART I) 

4 sem. hrs. 

Pronunciation; essentials of grammar; reading graded mater- 
ial; exercises in writing easy Latin; consideration of the 
Latin element in English. 

112 FIRST-YEAR LATIN (PART II) 

4 sem. hrs. 

Continuation of Part I. 

115 SECOND- YEAR LATIN (PART I) 
4 sem. hrs. 

Review of Latin fundamentals. Practice in writing simple 
Latin. Reading beginning with graded Latin selections and 
progressing to selections from various authors. Prerequi- 
sites: LAT 112 or high school Latin equivalent or consent 
department chair. 



Languages, Literatures, and Cultures 199 

116 SECOND- YEAR LATIN (PART II) MC-LH 

4 sem. hrs. 

Continuation of Part I. Class reading of short stories, plays, 
and essays. Grammar review, oral and written composition. 
Prerequisites: LAT 115. ENG 101 required if course taken 
as part of General Education program. 

Spanish Courses 

Heritage speakers of Spanish should consult the Depart- 
ment for further information. 

1 1 1 FIRST- YE AR SPANISH (PART I) 
4 sem. hrs. 

Fundamentals of grammar. Practice in speaking, understand- 
ing, reading and writing Spanish. Not recommended if stu- 
dent had 3 years high school Spanish. Not for credit if had 
SPA 115, 116 or 120. 

112 FIRST-YEAR SPANISH (PART II) 
4 sem. hrs. 

Continuation of Part I. Not recommended if student had 3 
years high school Spanish. Not for credit if had SPA 115, 
116 or 120. 

115 SECOND-YEAR SPANISH (PART I) 
4 sem. hrs. 

Review of Spanish grammar, vocabulary building, oral and 
written practice. Prerequisites: SPA 1 1 1 and 1 12 or equivalent. 

116 SECOND-YEAR SPANISH (PART II) MC-LH 
4 sem. hrs. 

Continuation of SPA 115. Class reading of short stories, 
plays, and essays. Grammar review and oral proficiency 
emphasized. This course is writing intensive. Prerequisites: 
SPA 115. ENG 101 required if course taken as part of General 
Education program. Can be taken concurrently with SPA 213. 

120 INTRODUCTION TO 
ACADEMIC SPANISH 

FOR SPANISH SPEAKERS MC-LH 

3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to the basics of grammar, spelling, and vocabu- 
lary of formal academic Spanish for students who already 
speak Spanish. Not for credit if had 1 16. Prerequisite: Abili- 
ty to speak Spanish at the high intermediate level, sufficient 
to carry on informal everyday conversations fluently. 

213 SPANISH GRAMMAR 
3 sem. hrs. 

Detailed study of Spanish grammar emphasizing technical 
and stylistic aspects of native language patterns. Formerly 
ADVANCED SPANISH GRAMMAR. Prerequisites: B or 
better in SPA 115 if taken concurrently with 213, or B or 
better in SPA 116 or 120. 

214 CONVERSATION AND 
CULTURE IN SPANISH 
3 sem. hrs. 

Focus on oral communication skills: topics will empha- 
size cultures in Spain, Latin American and Spanish- 
speaking regions of the United States. Not for credit if 
have ACTFL speaking score of Advanced. Formerly 
ADVANCED TECHNIQUES IN SPOKEN SPANISH Pre- 
requisite: C or better in SPA 1 16 or 120. 




200 



Languages, Literatures, and Cultures; Mathematics 



215 INTRODUCTION TO SPANISH LINGUISTICS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Principles and methods of objective language analysis 
applied to relevant issues in Spanish. Prerequisite: B or bet- 
ter in SPA 213. 

223 ADVANCED SPANISH COMPOSITION 
3 sem. hrs. 

Study of advanced composition skills in Spanish, including 
formal and informal writing, use of dictionaries and refer- 
ence materials, orthography, and vocabulary building. Pre- 
requisite: B or better in SPA 213. 

233 INTRODUCTION TO HISPANIC LITERATURE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Reading and analysis of representative poems, plays and 
prose texts as first general introduction to Spanish and Span- 
ish-American literature. Prerequisite: B or better in SPA 
213. 

240 BUSINESS SPANISH 
3 sem. hrs. 

Development of practical language skills needed for doing 
business in the Spanish speaking world from a cultural and 
commercial perspective. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better 
in SPA 1 16, 120, 213 or 223 recommended. 

243 CULTURA ESPANOLA 
3 sem. hrs. 

Spanish customs and institutions in their historical per- 
spective. Formerly CIVILIZACION ESPANOLA. Prerequi- 
sites: SPA 213 required; SPA 223 recommended. 

244 CULTURA HISPANOAMERICANA 

3 sem. hrs. 

Cultural life and customs of Spanish-speaking countries in 
the Americas. Formerly CIVILIZACION HISPANO- 
AMERICANA. Prerequisites: SPA 213 required; SPA 223 
recommended. 

301 SERVING SPANISH-SPEAKING POPULATIONS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Basic Spanish for initial professional encounters with Span- 
ish-speaking populations, examination of linguistic and cul- 
tural issues that affect professional effectiveness. Not for 
credit SPA major/minor. Prerequisites: Admission to a 
major and completion of at least 2 courses in major (may sub 
professional experience with consent of instructor). 

305 CURRENT TOPICS IN HISPANIC 
CIVILIZATION AND CULTURE 

3 sem. hrs. 

Recent trends, issues and changes in Spanish-speaking 
world. Varying topics and pedagogical strategies for 
teaching culture. May be repeated if content different. Pre- 
requisites: SPA 2 1 7 or 2 1 8 or 243 or 244. 

310 SPANISH SYNTAX 
3 sem. hrs. 

In-depth study of grammatical structures and the relations 
between structure and meaning based on current analytic 
approaches to syntax. Prerequisite: SPA 215 or consent of 
instructor. 



311 SPANISH PHONETICS AND PHONOLOGY 
3 sem. hrs. 

In-depth study of the fundamental concepts of Spanish 
Phonetics and Phonology. The course treats the Spanish 
sound system and its core phonological processes. Prereq- 
uisite: SPA 215 or consent instructor. 

323 SPANISH LITERATURE: MEDIEVAL 
AND RENAISSANCE 

3 sem. hrs. 

Reading and analysis of major Spanish writers from the 
Medieval period through the Renaissance, in their literary 
and cultural contexts. Formerly SPA 253 SURVEY OF 
SPANISH LITERA PURE I. Prerequisite: SPA 233. 

324 SPANISH LITERATURE: 18TH CENTURY 
TO PRESENT DAY 

3 sem. hrs. 

Reading and analysis of major Spanish writers from the 18th 
century to the present day, in their literary and cultural contexts. 
Formerly SPA 254 SURVEY OF SPANISH LITERATURE 
II Prerequisite: SPA 233. 

325 SPANISH AMERICAN LITERATURE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Reading and analysis of major Spanish American writers, 
in their literary and cultural contexts. Formerly SPA 255 
SUR VEY OF SPANISH AMERICAN LITERA TURE. Prereq- 
uisite: SPA 233. 

336 SELECTED TOPICS IN SPANISH- 
AMERICAN LITERATURE 

3 sem. hrs. 

Variable topics providing in-depth study of major authors, 
works, genres, themes, or movements. May repeat if content 
differs. Prerequisite: SPA 323 or 324 or 325. 

337 SELECTED TOPICS IN PENINSULAR 
SPANISH LITERATURE 

3 sem. hrs. 

In-depth study of major authors, works, genres, themes, 
or movements in Spanish literature from the Middle 
Ages to the present. May repeat if content differs. For- 
merly SELECTED TOPICS IN MODERN-PENINSULAR 
SPANISH LITERATURE. Prerequisite: SPA 323 or 324 
or 325. 

360 STUDIES IN SPANISH LINGUISTICS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Detailed study of a particular linguistic subdiscipline of the 
Spanish language. May repeat if content differs. Prerequi- 
site: SPA 215. 

370 TOPICS IN SPANISH PEDAGOGY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Exploration of different pedagogical issues for the Spanish 
language classroom. May repeat if content differs. Prerequi- 
site: SPA 310 or consent instructor. LAN 319 recommended. 

385 TOPICS IN HISPANIC LITERATURE 
3 sem. hrs. 

Intensive study of a genre, movement, author or work. This 
study varies each semester. May repeat if content differs. 
Formerly SELECTED TOPICS IN SPANISH LITERATURE. 
Prerequisite: SPA 323 or 324 or 325. 



Mathematics 



201 



MATHEMATICS (MAT) 452 

313 Stevenson Hall, (309) 438-8781 
Web address: Math.lllinoisState.edu 

Chairperson: George Seelinger. 

Tenured/Tenure-track Faculty: 

Professors: Clements, Eggleton, Ellerton, El-Zanati, Gam- 
age, Langrall, Martin, Ostaszewski, Plantholt, Presmeg, 
Tipnis. 

Associate Professors: F. Akman, O. Akman, Barrett, 
Cheng, Ionescu, Jordon, Meier, Mooney, Rich, Seelinger, 
Sissokho, Thiagarajah, Yamskulna, Zhao. 
Assistant Professors: Barker, Cullen, Tobias, Winsor. 

For current information on faculty interests and email 
addresses, Mathematics programs, and schedule of classes, 
visit our Internet Website: www.math.ilstu.edu. 

General Department Information 

Mathematics Requirements for Elementary and Middle 
School Education Majors: 

Middle School Mathematics Specialization: 

— 30 hours required. 

— Required courses: MAT 130, 131, 202, 302, 304, 309 
and 312; 

— Electives (choose one): MAT 307, 3 14, or 3 1 5. 

Middle School Mathematics Endorsement: 

— 22 hours, 18 hours of mathematics content and 4 hours 
of middle grades mathematics methods. C&I 233 and 
PSY 302 are also required. 

— Required courses: MAT 130, 131, 202, 302, 309, and 312. 

— NOTE: Students completing the Middle School Math- 
ematics Specialization also qualify for the Middle 
School Mathematics Endorsement. 

Elementary Education or Early Childhood Education 
Major Area of Concentration in Mathematics: 

— 1 8 hours of mathematics content courses required. 

— Required courses: MAT 130, 131, 202, 309 and 312. 

Cooperative Education/Internship in Mathematics: 

The Department offers a Cooperative Education/Intern- 
ship program for undergraduate Mathematics majors which 
provides for practical work experience in business, govern- 
ment, or industry. Students interested in participating in the 
program may secure further information by contacting the 
Mathematics Department Office. 

HONORS IN MATHEMATICS 

The Department offers an honors program for majors 
emphasizing a broad liberal arts program with requirements 
in Mathematics and in the General Education Program. 
Students interested in participating in departmental hon- 
ors programs may secure further information by contact- 
ing the Undergraduate Director. In addition students must 



fulfill the general requirements for participation in the 
University Honors Program. Completion of the program 
will be posted on a student's transcript and diploma. The 
Department also offers in-course honors for students 
enrolled in the University Honors Program. 

MINOR IN COGNITIVE SCIENCE 

The Department of Mathematics participates in the 
Minor in Cognitive Science program. Several courses 
offered by the Department contribute to the minor. For 
further information, please consult a Department advisor 
as well as the section entitled "Minor in Cognitive Sci- 
ence" under University- Wide Curriculum in this Under- 
graduate Catalog. 



Mathematics Programs 

Degrees Offered: B.A., B.S. 

Career Information for Mathematics Majors and 
Minors: 

Career needs in a wide variety of vocations are met by the 
diverse course offerings in the Mathematics Department. 
These include vocations in Secondary Teaching, Business 
Management, Statistics, and Actuarial Science; vocations that 
involve research or applications of Mathematics in business, 
government, and industry; and vocations involving research or 
applications of Mathematics in the physical and social sci- 
ences. The needs of those preparing for continued study and 
research in Mathematics are met also by the departmental 
offerings. The undergraduate degree programs are designed to 
be sufficiently flexible to meet career aspirations, to allow for 
individual exploration in various areas of interest, and also to 
permit suitable breadth for a liberal education. 

Students are urged to consult with the Mathematics 
Undergraduate Director or Mathematics faculty in planning 
their programs. Information on careers in Mathematics can 
be secured from the Mathematics Undergraduate Director 
and from the Mathematics Career Center in Stevenson 313. 

Students interested in meeting the requirements for cer- 
tification to teach secondary school Mathematics must con- 
sult with a Mathematics Education advisor to design a 
special program of studies. 

Students preparing for a specific career are advised to 
include courses from the appropriate list(s) that follow. The 
courses with an asterisk should be among those selected. 
Those wishing a major or minor in Mathematics should 
select additional courses from the list as well. (Note that 
some courses in the following lists may not count toward 
major or minor requirements.): 

— Business Management: MAT 250, 260, 337, 340, 350, 
351*, 353, 356, 361, 362*, 363, 378. 

— Secondary Teaching: MAT 210, 211*, 223*, 236*, 
247, 260*, 268, 320, 321, 323*, 324*, 326*, 330*, 
336,347,350,351,362,378. 

— Business, Government, and Industry: MAT 250, 
260, 337, 340*, 341, 345, 351*, 353, 356*, 361, 362, 
363,378. 

— Applications or Research in Physical Sciences: 
MAT 236, 250, 336, 337, 340*, 341*, 345*, 350, 378. 




202 



Mathematics 



— Applications or Research in Social Sciences: MAT 

250, 260, 337, 340, 350*, 351*, 356*, 361, 362, 
363,378. 

— Graduate Study and Research in Mathematics: MAT 

210, 236*, 247, 330, 336*, 337*, 340, 341, 345, 347*, 
350,351,361,378. 

Program Admission Requirements for New and 
Continuing Students: 

Admission to this academic program is limited and is 
based on space availability and the competitiveness of the 
applicant pool. Factors that may be considered include, but 
are not limited to: courses completed, cumulative GPA, 
hours completed, personal interview or written statement, 
and samples of work completed. For additional information 
on minimum requirements for admission and the application 
and selection process, visit www.FindYourMajor.ilstu.edu or 
contact the undergraduate advisor for the intended major. 

Departmental requirements for admission to the Uni- 
versity Professional Studies program include a minimum 
Mathematics GPA of 2.20, a cumulative GPA of 2.50 and 
completion of Calculus I, II, and III and MAT 223. 

The term "Mathematics GPA" used above and through- 
out this Undergraduate Catalog means a GPA computed 
using all college Mathematics courses completed at Illinois 
State University that are eligible for credit toward the major 
as well as other required courses for the major. 

The only Mathematics courses that are not eligible 
for credit toward the major are the following: MAT 102, 
104, 108, 113, 119, 120, 121, 130, 131, 150, 152, 160, 162, 
201, 202, 298, 298.50, 302, 304, 307, 309, 312, 314, 315, 
385. In addition, MAT 280 and 283 are not eligible for credit 
toward MAT/MAT Education Sequences. 

Graduation GPA Requirement for Majors: 

The minimum graduation Mathematics GPA is 2.00 for 
a Mathematics Major, 2.80 for a Mathematics Education 
Major, 2.50 for Mathematics Major: Actuarial Science 
Sequence, and 2.00 for Mathematics Major: Statistics 
Sequence. These grade point averages are computed using 
the following courses taken at Illinois State: the required 
English and computer programming courses and all Mathe- 
matics courses that are eligible for credit toward the major. 

NOTE: Students who have taken calculus in high 
school may request to take a Calculus Proficiency Test. If 
proficiency credit is granted, students may begin their Math- 
ematics courses with MAT 146 or a higher-level course. 

To ensure proper placement, transfer students should 
consult with an advisor prior to registration for classes. 

MAJOR IN MATHEMATICS 

— A minimum of 42 hours in Mathematics required. 

— Required courses: MAT 145, 146, 147, 175, 247, 260, 
350; ENG 145 or 249 or equivalent. 

— 1 computer programming course from: ITK 165, 168. 
NOTE: Hours taken in Information Technology do not 
count toward the required 42 hours in Mathematics. 

— At least 1 course chosen from: MAT 236, 330, 337, 
347, 363. 



— 2 course-pairs from the following groups. These course- 
pairs must be selected from different groups: 

Algebra group: (MAT 236, 336); (MAT 236, 337). 

Analysis group: (MAT 247, 345); (MAT 247, 347); 

(MAT 340, 341). 

Discrete group: (MAT 260, 361); (MAT 260, 362); 

(MAT 260, 363). 

Statistics group: (MAT 350, 351); (MAT 350, 378). 

— Submission of senior portfolio (see advisor). 

Suggested Mathematics Schedules for Majors: 

Schedule (a) Students beginning with Precalculus 
Schedule (b) Students beginning with Calculus I 
Schedule (c) Accelerated schedule for honors students 
or those preparing for graduate school 



Semester 



(a) 



(b) 



(c) 



1 


144 


145 


145 


2 


145 


146 


146 


3 


146 


147 


147 


4 


147 


175 


175, 260 


5 


175, 260 


247, 260 


247 



Teacher Certification Sequence: 

This sequence of the major is part of the entitlement pro- 
gram leading to high school certification. 

— A minimum of 53 hours in Mathematics is required with 
a minimum overall GPA of 2.80 and a minimum Mathe- 
matics GPA of 2.80 required for retention and graduation. 

— Required courses: MAT 145, 146, 147, 175, 211, 
223, 236, 260, 320, 323, 324, 350, 351. NOTE: 
MAT 21 1 and C&I 216 or equivalent, and MAT 236 
(or concurrent registration) are prerequisites for 
MAT 323. MAT 323 must be completed before the 
student teaching experience. 

— Capstone requirement: MAT 268 or 328. 

— Computer Science Requirement: One of MAT 326, 
ITK 165, or 168. NOTE: Hours taken to fulfill this 
computer science requirement do not count toward 
the required 53 hours in Mathematics. 

— At least one additional course must be chosen from 200- 
or 300-level mathematics courses that are offered for 
major/minor credit other than MAT 326 and courses 
designed for the actuarial sequence. 

— Interested students should consult their advisor about 
opportunities for tutoring secondary school students, 
serving as a teaching assistant, or other relevant volun- 
tary Clinical Experiences. 

— Professional Education Requirements: C&I 212, 214, 
216; EAF 228 or 231 or 235; PSY 215; Student 
Teaching 399.27 (two sections of 5 hours each). 

— Submission of senior portfolio that is done in 
methods classes. 

— A 2.80 GPA in the major, C or better in all required 
major courses, and adherence to all requirements and 
deadlines is required for admission to Professional Stud- 
ies and Student Teaching. Application forms and infor- 
mation about deadlines and procedures for admission to 
Professional Studies and Student Teaching are available 
from the Council for Teacher Education and on the 
Mathematics Department website. 



Mathematics 



203 



Admission to the Mathematics Teacher Certification 
Sequence is limited and highly competitive. 

Suggested Mathematics Schedules for Teacher 
Certification Sequence Majors: 

Schedule (a) Students beginning with Precalculus 
Schedule (b) Students beginning with Calculus I 
Schedule (c) Accelerated schedule for honors students 
or those preparing for graduate school 



Semester 



(a) 



(b) 



(c) 



1 


144 


145 


145 


2 


145 


146, 223 


146, 223 


3 


146, 223 


147 


147 


4 


147 


175, 350 


175, 260 


5 


175, 350 


211,260 


211,350 



Actuarial Science Sequence: 

This sequence of the major is designed to teach the stu- 
dents the mathematical foundations of actuarial science, 
and to prepare them for careers as actuaries in a variety of 
fields dealing with the risk of potential financial losses, 
such as life insurance, health insurance, financial risk man- 
agement, property/casualty/liability insurance, pensions, or 
employee benefits. 

— 67 hours required. 

— Required courses: MAT 145, 146, 147, 175, 280, 350, 
351, 353, 380, 383, 384; ACC 131, 132; ECO 105; FIL 
242, 250, 341; ITK 168 or ITK 177. 

— Submission of senior portfolio (see actuarial advisor). 

— Students are encouraged to take MAT 298 (professional 
internship) MAT 283 (actuarial computing) and inten- 
sive reviews for actuarial examinations offered through 
the Illinois State University Conferencing Unit. 

Suggested Mathematics Schedules for Actuarial Science 
Majors: 

Schedule (a) Students beginning with Precalculus 
Schedule (b) Students beginning with Calculus I 
Schedule (c) Accelerated schedule for honors students 
or those preparing for graduate school 



Semester 



(a) 



(b) 



(c) 



SOA exam P (same as CAS exam 1): MAT 350 

SOA exam FM (same as CAS exam 2): MAT 280 

SOA exam MLC and CAS exam 3L: MAT 380, and part 

of MAT 383 

SOA exam MFE and CAS exam 3F: MAT 383 

SOA exam C (same as CAS exam 4): MAT 384 

CAS exam 3: MAT 351, MAT 380, MAT 383 

VEE Statistics: MAT 353 

VEE Economics: ECO 105 

VEE Finance: FIL 242 and FIL 341 

Statistics Sequence: 

This sequence of the major is designed to prepare stu- 
dents for statistical work in industry and government. In 
addition to learning the mathematical foundation in statis- 
tics, students study at least two cognate areas of application 
of statistics from Biometrics, Econometrics, and Psycho- 
metrics. This will allow students to experience many fields 
of statistical applications and select a field of their choice 
for a career. 

- Required courses: MAT 145, 146, 147, 175, 260, 
350, 351. At least two courses from the following 
list: MAT 353, 356, 450, 453, 455, 456, 458 (Only 
senior students with good standing will be allowed 
to take a graduate-level course with approval of the 
Graduate School.) 

— One computer-programming course from: ITK 155.01, 
ITK 155.02. 

— Select at least two of the following areas and com- 
plete at least two courses from the list of approved 
courses for each area. 

Biological Sciences: BSC 201, 203, 219, 297, 321. 

Economics: ECO 225, 235, 238, 239, 240, 241, 320, 

331,339. 

Psychology: PSY 230, 231, 233, 331, 334. 

It is to the advantage of the student to have a minor or 
double major in one of the above areas. However, it is not a 
requirement for the sequence. Senior students in good stand- 
ing are encouraged to take upper level applied statistics 
courses from selected cognate areas. 

Suggested Mathematics Schedules for the Statistics 
Sequence Majors: 

Schedule (a) Students beginning with Precalculus 
Schedule (b) Students beginning with Calculus I 
Schedule (c) Students intending to pursue graduate studies 



1 


144 


145 


145 










2 
3 


145 
146 


146 
147 


146 
147, 175 


Semester 


(a) 


(b) 


(c) 










j 


144 


145 


145 


4 


147 


175, 280 


280, 350 


2 


145 


146 


146 


5 


175, 350 


350 


351,380 


















3 


146 


147, 260 


147, 260 


6 


280, 351 


351 


384 










7 


353, 380, 383 


353, 380, 383 


353, 383 


4 


147, 260 


175, 350 


175,350 


8 


384 


384 


Open 


5 


175, 350 


351 


351, ST* 










6 


351, ST* 


356, ST* 


356, ST* 




Required courses in the Actuarial Science 


Sequence 


7 


353, ST* 


353, ST* 


353, ST* 


(OL 


tlined above) provide the contents of the 


Society of 


8 


356, ST*, ST* 


ST*, ST* 


ST* 



Actuaries examinations P, FM, M (both MLC and MFE) and 
C, or the Casualty Actuarial Society examinations 1,2,3 and 
4, as well as complete VEE requirements. Courses corre- 
spond to professional actuarial examinations as follows: 



*In the above schedule ST stands for selected courses 
from cognate areas. Senior students with good standing are 
encouraged to take upper level statistics courses. However in 



204 



Mathematics 



order to take a graduate level course permission is required 
from the respective departments and the graduate school. 

MINOR IN MATHEMATICS 



236, 
351, 



— 22-24 hours in Mathematics required. 

— Required courses: MAT 145 and 146. 

— At least four courses chosen from: MAT 147, 175, 
247, 250, 260, 330, 336, 337, 340, 341, 345, 347, 
361,362,363,378. 

MINOR IN MATHEMATICS 



For Teacher Education: 

— Required courses: MAT 145, 146, 147, 175, 211, 236, 
and 323. NOTE: MAT 21 1 and C&I 216 or the equiva- 
lent, and MAT 236 (or concurrent registration) are pre- 
requisites for MAT 323. 

— Students should consult an advisor. 

The Mathematics for Teacher Education Minor does 
not lead directly to teacher certification. Students seeking 
an additional teaching endorsement in this academic area 
should contact their advisor or the Illinois State Board of 
Education Website (www.isbe.net) for specific certifica- 
tion requirements. 

CLINICAL EXPERIENCES IN TEACHER EDUCATION 

Clinical Experiences are provided in off-campus clini- 
cal teaching centers, in local schools and in campus labo- 
ratory schools, in agencies and other approved non-school 
settings. All students will show verification of having 
completed pre-student teaching field experiences com- 
mensurate with attaining local, state, and national stan- 
dards. Students must provide their own transportation to 
Clinical Experience sites. 

The approximate number of clinical hours and type of 
activity associated with each course offering can be found 
with the appropriate course description. The following 
legend relates to the type and kind of activity related to a 
specific course. 

Clinical Experiences Legend 

1 . Observation 

2. Tutoring one-on-one contact 

3. Non-instruction assisting 

4. Instructional aiding a group 

5. Micro teaching 

6. Simulation lab exercises 

7. Work with clinic client 

8. Graduate practicum 

9. Professional meeting 

10. Other 

Mathematics Courses 

— A year of high school geometry and a second year of 
high school algebra are highly recommended for anyone 
who wants to take Mathematics courses. 

— Students may not enroll in a course which is prerequi- 
site to a course that has been completed with a grade 
of C or better. 



102 BASIC ALGEBRA 
4 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to the basic concepts of elementary algebra. 
Does not count toward graduation. CR/NC only. 

104 INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA 

3 sem. hrs. 

Intermediate course between one year of high school algebra 
and college algebra. Scientific calculator required. Meets 5 
days a week. Does not count toward graduation. CR/NC 
only. Not for credit if had MAT 107. Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics placement or credit in MAT 102. 

108 TRIGONOMETRY 

2 sem. hrs. 

Circular functions, their graphs, inverses, identities and 
applications. Right triangle trigonometry and applica- 
tions. Department-approved graphing calculator 
required. Not for credit major/minor or if had MAT 109. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics placement or grade of C or 
better in MAT 119. 

113 ELEMENTS OF MATHEMATICAL 

REASONING IC-M 

4 sem. hrs. 

The study of elementary counting methods, basic statis- 
tics; and elementary mathematical modeling techniques, 
focusing on reasoning and solving real-life problems. 
Department approved calculator required. Not for credit 
major/minor. Not for credit if had MAT 105 or 111. May 
not be taken CT/NC. Formerly MAT 189.17. Prerequi- 
site: Mathematics placement exam or MAT 104. 

119 COLLEGE ALGEBRA 

3 sem. hrs. 

Functions, relations, and inverses with emphasis on poly- 
nomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. 
Algebra of polynomials. Solving quadratic, exponential, 
and logarithmic equations. Solving quadratic, rational, 
and absolute value inequalities. Department-approved 
graphing calculator required. Meets 5 days a week. Not 
for credit major/minor. Prerequisite: Mathematics place- 
ment or MAT 104. 



120 



IC-M 



FINITE MATHEMATICS 
4 sem. hrs. 

Linear functions, matrices, systems of linear equations, 
sets and counting, probability, statistics, and mathematics 
of finance. Department-approved graphing calculator 
required. May not be taken under the CT/NC option. Not for 
credit major/minor. Prerequisite: Mathematics placement or 
grade of C or better in MAT 1 19. 



121 



MC-QR 



APPLIED CALCULUS 
4 sem. hrs. 

Non-linear functions, intuitive differential, integral, and 
multivariate calculus, applications. Department-approved 
graphing calculator required. Not for credit major/minor. 
May not be taken under the CT/NC option. Prerequisites: 
Grade of C or better in MAT 120 and either Mathematics 
placement or C or better in MAT 1 19. 



Mathematics 



205 



130 DIMENSIONS OF MATHEMATICAL 
REASONING IC-M 
3 sem. hrs. 

Focus on mathematical problem-solving and reasoning with 
understanding of numbers and their properties through vari- 
ous representations, including algebraic. Scientific calculator 
required. Not for credit major/minor. May not be taken CT/NC 
option. Formerly DIMENSIONS OF MATHEMATICAL 
PROBLEM SOLVING. Prerequisite: Mathematics placement 
or MAT 104. 

131 GEOMETRIC REASONING: GEOMETRY 
AS EARTH MEASURES MC-QR 

3 sem. hrs. 

A multidimensional focus on geometry as visualization, con- 
struction of figures, the study of the physical world, and a 
mathematical system. Not for credit major/minor. Prerequi- 
sites: MAT 113, 120, 130, or 145. 

144 PRECALCULUS 

4 sem. hrs. 

Polynomial, absolute value, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and 
trigonometric functions and their graphs. Properties of trigonomet- 
ric and inverse trigonometric functions and their applications. Con- 
ies, translation, and rotation of axes. Department-approved 
graphing calculator required. Prerequisites: Mathematics place- 
ment or grade of C or better in both MAT 108 and 1 19. 

145 CALCULUS I IC-M 
4 sem. hrs. 

Polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric 
functions. Differentiation with associated applications. Intro- 
duction to integration with applications. Department- 
approved graphing calculator required. May not be taken 
under the CT/NC option. Prerequisite: Mathematics place- 
ment or C or better in MAT 144. 

146 CALCULUS II MC-QR 

4 sem. hrs. 

Techniques and applications of integration, L'Hopital's rule, 
improper integrals, applications, infinite series, and Taylor's 
Theorem. Differential equations. Department-approved graph- 
ing calculator required. May not be taken under the CT/NC 
option. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MAT 145. 

147 CALCULUS III 
4 sem. hrs. 

Polar coordinates and parametric equations in the plane with 
applications. Vector curves and surfaces in space. Partial 
derivatives, gradients, directional derivatives, and tangent 
planes. Multiple integration and line integrals. Department- 
approved graphing calculator required. Prerequisite: Grade 
of C or better in MAT 146. 

150 FUNDAMENTALS OF STATISTICAL 

REASONING MC-QR 

4 sem. hrs. 

Develop statistical reasoning to analyze data and use ele- 
mentary probability ideas to justify the validity of the 
analysis. Not for credit major/minor. Prerequisites: Grade 
of C or better in MAT 1 13, 120, 130 or 145. 

152 STRUCTURE OF NUMBER SYSTEMS II 
3 sem. hrs. 

Concepts and structure of real numbers. Probability, statistics, 
and algebra. Not for credit if had MAT 202. Not for credit 
major/minor. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MAT 130. 



160 ELEMENTARY DISCRETE MATHEMATICS 

4 sem. hrs. 

Elementary introduction to discrete mathematics, com- 
prising topics relevant to computer science. Logic, algo- 
rithms, recursion, enumeration, relations, graph theory 
(including trees). Not for credit major/minor. Prerequisite: 
Grade of C or better in MAT 120 or 145. 

175 ELEMENTARY LINEAR ALGEBRA 
4 sem. hrs. 

Vector geometry, matrices, systems of linear equations, 
vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues and 
eigenvectors, diagonalization, applications to the physical 
and social sciences. Department-approved graphing cal- 
culator required. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in 
MAT 146; 147 recommended. 

201 TEACHING MATHEMATICS IN 
THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

3 sem. hrs. 

Background for meaningful teaching of whole numbers, frac- 
tions, and geometry/measurement concepts. Special emphasis 
on planning instruction for children at the K-8 level. May 
Include Clinical Experiences. Not for credit major/minor. 
Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in MAT 130 and C or 
better in MAT 152 or MAT 202. Elementary Education or 
Middle Level Teacher Education major only. Completion of 
60 hours and 2.50 major and overall GPA. 

202 ALGEBRAIC REASONING FOR 
THE K-8 TEACHER 

4 sem. hrs. 

Focus on algebraic reasoning with understanding of vari- 
ables and their uses. Content includes proportional rea- 
soning, linear and non-linear functions and inverse 
functions and elementary curve fitting techniques. 
Department-approved graphing calculator required. Not 
for credit major/minor. Formerly MATHEMATICS FOR 
THE MATH K-8 SPECIALIST. Prerequisites: Grade of C 
or better in MAT 130; 2.50 major GPA. 

210 SYMBOLIC LOGIC I 

3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to proof theory. Formal deductive systems, 
especially propositional logic and predicate logic. Properties 
of deductive systems, such as consistency and completeness. 
Also offered as PHI 210. Prerequisites: 1 year each high 
school algebra and high school geometry. 

211 EUCLIDEAN AND NON-EUCLIDEAN 
GEOMETRY 

4 sem. hrs. 

Inductive and deductive study of Euclidean geometry; 
includes transformations, tesselations, polyhedra, classi- 
cal theorems, introduction to non-Euclidean geometry. 
Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in MAT 147; C or bet- 
ter in MAT 175 or concurrent registration. 

223 INTRODUCTION TO SECONDARY 
MATHEMATICS EDUCATION 
2 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to secondary mathematics teaching centered 
around classroom observations, discussion of teaching 
and learning, and doing mathematics while servicing all 
students. Includes Clinical Experiences: 20+ hours, Types 
1-5. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MAT 145. 



206 



Mathematics 



236 ELEMENTARY ABSTRACT ALGEBRA 
4 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to rings, integral domains, and fields including 
the ring of integers, the fields of real and complex numbers, 
quotient rings, polynomial rings, homomorphisms, and 
ideals. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MAT 175. 

247 ELEMENTARY REAL ANALYSIS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Careful examination of the theory of calculus through the 
study of properties of the real line. Prerequisites: Grade of C 
or better in MAT 147 and 175. 

250 INTRODUCTION TO PROBABILITY 
AND STATISTICS 

4 sem. hrs. 

Basic probability and statistical inference. Statistical cover- 
age includes comparison of means and regression analysis. 
Extensive use of calculators and computers. Prerequisite: 
MAT 121 or MAT 145. 

260 DISCRETE MATHEMATICS 
4 sem. hrs. 

Counting problems, generating functions, recurrence relations, 
inclusion-exclusion, graphs, matching and covering, pigeonhole 
principle, applications. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in 
MAT 146. 

268 INTRODUCTION TO UNDERGRADUATE 
RESEARCH IN MATHEMATICS 

3 sem. hrs. 

An introduction to mathematical discovery through participa- 
tion in a departmental research program for undergraduates. 
May repeat if content differs; maximum 6 hours. Formerly 
MAT 289.23. Prerequisites: B or better in MAT 146 and 
consent instructor. 

280 FINANCIAL MATHEMATICS 

4 sem. hrs. 

Interest rates. Accumulation function. Annuities. Amortization 
schedules. Bonds and other securities. Amortization and depre- 
ciation. Yield curve. Duration, convexity, and immunization. 
Definitions of derivative securities. Formerly THEORY OF 
INTEREST. Prerequisites: Grade of B or better in MAT 145 
and 146 or consent instructor. 

283 INTRODUCTION TO 

ACTUARIAL COMPUTING 
1 sem. hr. 

Basic actuarial computing models in a computer classroom 
setting. Present values, risk classification, data analysis for 
premiums and reserves. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better 
in MAT 280 or consent instructor. 

298 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: INTERNSHIP 
IN MATHEMATICS 
2-4 sem. hrs. 

Practical experience through professionally-oriented work 
in business, government, or industry. One credit per 
month of full-time employment. May be repeated; maxi- 
mum 8 hours. No credit major/minor. CR/NC only. Pre- 
requisites: MAT 175 plus 2 approved courses in MAT 
beyond 175; 2.75 overall GPA and 3.00 department GPA. 
Consent department chair. 



302 TEACHING MATHEMATICS 
IN GRADES 6-8 
4 sem. hrs. 

Problems, viewpoints, and trends in teaching middle school 
or junior high mathematics. Implications of research related 
to organization, content, and techniques for teaching 
mathematics in grades 6-8. May Includes Clinical Expe- 
riences. Not for credit major/minor. Formerly TEACH- 
ING MATHEMATICS IN GRADES 5-8. Prerequisites: 
Grade of C or better in MAT 309 and 312 or concurrent reg- 
istration. Completion of 60 hours and 2.50 major and overall 
GPA. 

304 MODERN GEOMETRY FOR 
MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHERS 
4 sem. hrs. 

Topics include Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries and 
their history, transformations with connections to matrix alge- 
bra, fractals, and projective geometry. Department-approved 
graphing calculator required. Not for credit major/minor. For- 
merly TOPICS IN GEOMETRY FOR K-8 TEACHERS. Pre- 
requisites: Grade of C or better in MAT 131 and 202. 

307 MODERN ALGEBRA FOR 

MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHERS 

4 sem. hrs. 

Algebraic concepts and structures relevant to grades 6-8. 
Structure of familiar number systems compared to and 
contrasted with other mathematical systems. Not for 
credit major/minor. Formerly MODERN ALGEBRA FOR 
K-8 TEACHERS. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in 
MAT 304, 309 and 312. 

309 NUMBER THEORY 
FOR K-8 TEACHERS 

4 sem. hrs. 

Focus is on number theory concepts, including divisibility, 
primes, composites, special number sets, and basic counting 
principles. Department-approved graphing calculator 
required. Not for credit major/minor. Formerly PROBLEM- 
SOLVING IN GRADES K-8. Prerequisites: Grade of C or 
better in MAT 131 and 202. 

312 PROBABILISTIC AND STATISTICAL 
REASONING FOR K-8 TEACHERS 
4 sem. hrs. 

Descriptive statistics, lines of best fit, basic concepts of 
probability, simulation, probability distributions, expec- 
tation, and counting techniques. Department-approved 
graphing calculator required. Not for credit major/minor. 
Formerly PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS FOR K-8 
TEACHERS. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in MAT 
131 and 202. 

314 CONCEPTS OF CALCULUS 

FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHERS 
4 sem. hrs. 

Concepts of differential and integral calculus, including 
limits, sequences, and transcendental functions. Emphasis 
on the role of calculus in Mathematics and problem-solv- 
ing. Department-approved graphing calculator required. 
Not for credit major/minor. Formerly CONCEPTS OF 
CALCULUS FOR K-8 TEACHERS. Prerequisites: Grade 
of C or better in MAT 304, 309 and 312. 



Mathematics 



207 



315 MATHEMATICAL MODELING 

FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHERS 
4 sem. hrs. 

Mathematical modeling and problem-solving with applications 
involving networks and communication systems, finance, 
global positioning, data systems, and various branches of sci- 
ence. Department-approved graphing calculator required. Not 
for credit major/minor. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in 
MAT 304, 309 and 312. 

320 HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS 

3 sem. hrs. 

History of the development of mathematical techniques 
and ideas from early civilization to present, including con- 
nections between mathematics and sciences. Formerly HIS- 
TORY OF MATHEMATICS TO 1600. Not for credit if had 
MAT 321 HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS 1600-PRESENT. 
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MAT 147. 

323 TEACHING MATHEMATICS 
IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 

3 sem. hrs. 

The selection, placement and teaching of secondary mathe- 
matics topics. Analysis of recent trends and practices. 
Department-approved graphing calculator required. Includes 
Clinical Experiences: 35 hours, Type 1-5, 9. Prerequisites: 
Grade of C or better in MAT 211 and 223; C or better in 
MAT 236 or concurrent registration. C&I 216. Minimum 
2.80 Mathematics and overall GPA and Department 
approval. Admission to Professional Studies. 

324 SEMINARS FOR STUDENT 
TEACHERS OF MATHEMATICS 

3 sem. hrs. 

Examines methods and materials for teaching algebra, geome- 
try, and other secondary topics. Emphasizes content and pro- 
fessional aspects of mathematics teaching. 
Department-approved graphing calculator required. Includes 
Clinical Experiences: 25 hours, Type 1-5, 9. Prerequisites: 
Grade of C or better in MAT 236 and 323 and concurrent reg- 
istration or completion of student teaching in Mathematics. 
Admission to Student Teaching. 

326 TECHNOLOGY TOOLS FOR SECONDARY 
SCHOOL MATHEMATICS 
3 sem. hrs. 

Integrating computers and calculators in the secondary Mathe- 
matics curriculum. Department-approved graphing calculator 
required. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MAT 175. 

328 MATHEMATICS FOR 
SECONDARY TEACHER: 
A CAPSTONE EXPERIENCE 

3 sem. hrs. 

Using college-level mathematics to examine high school 
mathematics from an advanced perspective. Formerly MAT 
389.65. Prerequisites: MAT 223 and 211 or consent of 
instructor. Mathematics Education Majors only. 

330 NUMBER THEORY 
3 sem. hrs. 

Divisibility, primes, unique factorization, numerical func- 
tions, congruences, Diophantine equations, other topics. 
Prerequisite: C or better in MAT 175 or 260. 



336 ADVANCED ABSTRACT ALGEBRA 

3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to groups, including permutation, symmetry 
and matrix groups, homomorphisms, normality, quotient 
groups, applications. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in 
MAT 175. MAT 236 recommended. 

337 ADVANCED LINEAR ALGEBRA 

4 sem. hrs. 

Abstract vector spaces, linear transformations and matrices, 
inner product spaces, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonal- 
ization. Applications to geometry, the physical and social sci- 
ences. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in MAT 175 and 
senior standing. 

340 ELEMENTARY DIFFERENTIAL 
EQUATIONS I 

3 sem. hrs. 

First-order differential equations, linear differential equa- 
tions, power series methods, Laplace transform methods, 
applications of differential equations. Prerequisites: Grade 
of C or better in MAT 147; 175 or concurrent registration in 
MAT 175 recommended; and C, FORTRAN, Pascal, PL/I, 
or approved programming language. 

341 ELEMENTARY DEFERENTIAL 
EQUATIONS H 

3 sem. hrs. 

Linear systems of differential equations, numerical methods, 
Fourier series, boundary-value problems, introduction to par- 
tial differential equations (Laplace, heat, and wave equa- 
tions) and applications to nonlinear systems and phenomena. 
Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in MAT 175 and 340. 

345 ADVANCED CALCULUS 

4 sem. hrs. 

Calculus of functions of several variables, Taylor's series of 
several variables, maxima and minima, Lagrange multipli- 
ers, inverse and implicit function theorems, multiple integra- 
tion, line integrals, Green's, Stokes', and the divergence 
theorems. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in MAT 147 
and 175. 

347 ADVANCED REAL ANALYSIS 
4 sem. hrs. 

The real number system, topology of metric spaces, 
sequences, continuous functions, uniform convergence, 
differentiation, Taylor's Theorem, Riemann integration, 
the fundamental theorem of calculus, infinite series, 
power-series. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in MAT 
247 and 236; or 337 or consent instructor. 

350 APPLIED PROBABILITY MODELS 
4 sem. hrs. 

Sample spaces, discrete and continuous random variables, prob- 
ability functions, density, moment generating functions, impor- 
tant distributions. Multivariate distributions, Central Limit 
Theorem. Prerequisite: Grade of C pr better in MAT 147. 

351 STATISTICS AND DATA ANALYSIS 
4 sem. hrs. 

Statistical estimation. Point and interval estimators. Con- 
sistency, unbiasedness, minimum variance. Hypothesis 
testing. Likelihood ratio tests. Regression, analysis of 
variance. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MAT 350 
or consent of instructor. 




208 



Mathematics 



353 REGRESSION AND TIME SERIES 
ANALYSIS 

4 sem. hrs. 

Regression and time series methods for business and 
economic applications, including exponential smoothing 
and Box-Jenkins methods. Computer statistical package 
used. Also offered as ECO 353. Formerly ANALYSIS OF 
TIME SERIES. Prerequisite: MAT 351 or equivalent or 
consent instructor. 

356 STATISTICAL COMPUTING 
4 sem. hrs. 

Application of SAS and SPSS programs to real data empha- 
sizing regression, and analysis of variance. Prerequisites: 
Grade of C or better in 2 statistics courses; some facility 
with matrices. 

361 TOPICS IN DISCRETE 
MATHEMATICS 

2-4 sem. hrs. 

Study of selected areas of discrete mathematics. Consult 
the Course Registration Directory on iCampus for the top- 
ics to be offered and the hours of credit to be earned during 
any given semester. Each topic may be taken once. Prereq- 
uisites: Grade of C or better in MAT 175 or 260 and 
approved programming language. 

362 LINEAR PROGRAMMING 
4 sem. hrs. 

Modeling and solution of problems using the simplex 
met